IMDb > Don't Look Now (1973)
Don't Look Now
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Don't Look Now (1973) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
7.4/10   28,651 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Daphne Du Maurier (story)
Allan Scott (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Don't Look Now on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
January 1974 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A psychic thriller. See more »
Plot:
A married couple grieving the recent death of their little daughter are in Venice when they encounter two elderly sisters, one of whom is psychic and brings a warning from beyond. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won BAFTA Film Award. Another 8 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Chilling and mysterious See more (241 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Nicolas Roeg 
 
Writing credits
Daphne Du Maurier (story)

Allan Scott (screenplay) (as Alan Scott) and
Chris Bryant (screenplay)

Produced by
Peter Katz .... producer
Frederick Muller .... associate producer (as Federico Mueller)
Anthony B. Unger .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Pino Donaggio  (as Pino Donnagio)
 
Cinematography by
Anthony B. Richmond (director of photography) (as Anthony Richmond)
 
Film Editing by
Graeme Clifford 
 
Casting by
Miriam Brickman 
Ugo Mariotti 
 
Art Direction by
Giovanni Soccol 
 
Makeup Department
Giancarlo Del Brocco .... makeup artist
Maria Luisa Garbini .... hairdresser
Barry Richardson .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Franco Coduti .... unit manager
Tim Hampton .... production supervisor (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Francesco Cinieri .... assistant director
Gary White .... second assistant director: UK (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Francesco Chianese .... set dresser (as Francesco Chinanese)
 
Sound Department
Peter Davies .... sound recordist
Rodney Holland .... sound editor
Bob Jones .... dubbing mixer
Peter Maxwell .... adr mixer (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Richard Graydon .... stunt coordinator (as Richard Grayden)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Luciano Marrocchi .... gaffer
Spartaco Pizzi .... key grip
Simon Ransley .... assistant cameraman
Luciano Tonti .... camera operator
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Marit Allen .... wardrobe: Miss Christie's (as Marit Lieberson)
Anna Maria Feo .... wardrobe mistress (as Annamaria Fea)
Andrea Galer .... wardrobe: Miss Christie
 
Editorial Department
Peter Holt .... assistant editor
Tony Lawson .... assistant editor
Alfreda Benge .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Giampiero Boneschi .... conductor
Giampiero Boneschi .... music arranger
Giampiero Boneschi .... composer: additional music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Rita Agostini .... continuity
Hubert Doyle .... publicist
Terence O'Connor .... production accountant
Steve Previn .... production executive
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
110 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:M | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:16 | Netherlands:16 | Norway:16 (original rating) | Norway:18 (re-rating) | Portugal:M/16 | Singapore:R21 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (tv rating) | UK:15 (video re-rating) (2002) (2006) | UK:15 (re-rating) (2001) | UK:18 (video rating) (1988) | USA:R (MPAA rating: certificate #23694) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie met for the first time on the set of this film. The first scene they had to shoot was the sex scene, as Roeg wanted to "get it out of the way" and then move on to the "bone" of the matter. Christie was terrified.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the bathroom scene, John Baxter steps over Laura's clothes, piled on the floor. Among them is a pair of tights, which she was clearly not wearing in the preceding scene (in which she undresses).See more »
Quotes:
Inspector Longhi:The skill of police artists is to make the living appear dead.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Sixth Sense (1999)See more »
Soundtrack:
SalvatoreSee more »

FAQ

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130 out of 176 people found the following review useful.
Chilling and mysterious, 4 January 2005
Author: Paul from United States

There are two types of horror films, really. There are popcorn horror films, good for a cheap in-the-moment thrill at best, and there are serious horror films, movies that linger in the mind and in the bones. I have just watched Nicolas Roeg's 'Don't Look Now' and my spine is frozen. It's 4am, I'm alone, and I have a heightened awareness of sounds and sights I usually don't notice.

Here is a movie that's both resolved and unresolved, ultimately growing more ambiguous as it progresses and becomes more complex. After it is over and has become a complete(d) work to the eye of the viewer, the lasting impression is that of mystery. Too many films in this genre bark up the wrong tree, working to explain all of the events that unfold. By explaining nothing, by being almost abstract, questions and images will haunt the viewer indefinitely. It is what it is, and while this movie can be watched over and over, and the events that occur can be anticipated, they will forever remain an enigma. This is true cinema, purely visual and aural, without the helpful but ultimately self-defeating aid of a proxy observer; the viewer is the direct observer, and there's no filter through which the events and images develop any sort of tidy rationality.

Donald Sutherland's performance here is sober, adult, the grief of his character palpable. And in the face of this grief is a force that runs through the movie like a dark current, evoking the eternal and spookily ethereal and subterranean; less an eternity of the heavens than the eternity of a crypt. Venice is not merely the ideal location for this story, but the necessary location; it could not take place anywhere else. The unquestionable, and indeed imposing, Gothic majesty of the churches, whose interior height dwarfs their human occupants with the spiritual dread of the ancient, overlooks the canals of Venice like the wicked-faced stone gargoyles Sutherland finds himself physically embracing, while the canals that run through the city are literally the ghost of this couple's personal tragedy. Living in Venice, in light of the details surrounding their loss, seems almost a perverse choice, perhaps a masochistic one; they could be punishing themselves for their daughter's drowning by living in a flooded city.

It's not that Sutherland's character is a rational man in an irrational environment, but rather a rational man in an environment whose own secret code, which one may trust makes perfect sense to itself (like a tree in the forest that will only fall if no one is around to hear), is inaccessible and inexplicable to him, baring itself only in fragments in a way he chooses to ignore, just as you might ignore a spectral voice in the dead of night, dismissing it as a product of your imagination.

The movie's notorious love scene is jarringly explicit, yet rather than erotic, it is profoundly sad, and takes on a deeper (even creepy) resonance after the film ends. That the scene is intercut with scenes of Sutherland and Julie Christie dressing prevents the two from ever being completely naked and united; this editing choice changes the dimensions of the love scene in a way that I've never seen attempted elsewhere. At other points, Roeg inserts moments and images that carry sinister implications, none of which are ever concretely substantiated and only leave the viewer with more questions.

The film drifts along at a wandering pace. The final twenty minutes are among the most atmospheric and suspenseful twenty minutes in any film, culminating in a montage that is absolutely chilling.

'The Blair Witch Project,' made over two decades later and probably influenced by this, has similar aspirations, but finally has only a fraction of the emotional gravity.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (241 total) »

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Recent Posts (updated daily)User
This film is flawless origamiswann
Why don't so many people 'Get it'? bumbledown08
This movie was pure crap. Copaface
Keira Knightley erictopp
Would You Consider Don't Look Now Horror RdVirus777
John holding an invisible hand? sleepwalking
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