IMDb > "Columbo" Double Exposure (1973)

"Columbo" Double Exposure (1973)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   832 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Stephen J. Cannell (written by)
Richard Levinson (created by) ...
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Contact:
View company contact information for Double Exposure on IMDbPro.
TV Series:
Original Air Date:
16 December 1973 (Season 3, Episode 4)
Genre:
Plot:
A self-styled "motivation research specialist" uses subliminal cues to commit a murder. Lt. Columbo is on the case. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Robert Culp is on a killing spree again! See more (17 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Peter Falk ... Columbo

Robert Culp ... Dr. Bart Keppel
Robert Middleton ... Vic Norris

Chuck McCann ... Roger White
Louise Latham ... Mrs. Norris

Arlene Martel ... Tanya (credit only) (as Arlene Martell)
Danny Goldman ... Press photographer
John Milford ... 1st Detective

George Wyner ... Film Editor
Richard Stahl ... Ballistics Man
Francis De Sales ... Patterson (as Francis DeSales)

Alma Beltran ... Housekeeper
Dennis Robertson ... Detective Marley
Harry Hickox ... 2nd Detective
Ann Driscoll ... Mrs. Halstead
E.A. Sirianni ... Norbert (as E. A. Sirianni)
Manuel DePina ... 1st Detective
Thomas Bellin ... Technician
Peter Walker ... Narrator
Mary Beth Sikorski ... Receptionist
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mike Lally ... Parking Lot Guard (uncredited)
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Episode Crew
Directed by
Richard Quine 
 
Writing credits
Stephen J. Cannell (written by)

Richard Levinson (created by) &
William Link (created by)

Produced by
Edward K. Dodds .... associate producer
Dean Hargrove .... executive producer
Roland Kibbee .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Dick DeBenedictis  (as Dick De Benedictis)
 
Cinematography by
William Cronjager (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Ronald LaVine 
 
Art Direction by
John W. Corso 
 
Set Decoration by
Bill McLaughlin (set decorations) (as William McLaughlin)
 
Production Management
Brad H. Aronson .... unit manager (as Brad Aronson)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Phil Cook .... assistant director (as Phillip Cook)
 
Sound Department
Wallace R. Bearden .... sound (as Wallace Bearden)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Grady Hunt .... costumes
 
Editorial Department
Richard Belding .... editorial supervisor
Steve Johnson .... colorist (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Hal Mooney .... music supervisor
 
Other crew
Wayne Fitzgerald .... main title design
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
70 min | USA:76 min (dvd release)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-18 (2005) (DVD) (self applied)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The stage and theatre where Dr. Kepple shows his movie with subliminal cuts in "Double Exposure", with its gold curtain and distinctive stairs at stage right, is the same place where Dr. Mason delivers his motivational speech in "Columbo: How to Dial a Murder (#7.4)" (1978).See more »
Goofs:
Miscellaneous: Columbo had those photos of himself shot to splice them into the 35mm movie print, to lure out the murderer. The photos taken are 35mm slides (he shows them framed) and Columbo only stated that he had them processed and spliced into the film. Problem: Those slides would have to be converted into 35mm cine film frames. 35mm cine film runs vertical as opposed to the horizontal stills camera film. So the slides had to be rotated 90 degrees, reduced in size, the edges chopped to fit into the standard 35mm full frame "academy" aspect ratio (the movie shown was not wide-screen but rather "academy", similar to standard 16mm or Super8mm. In the 1970s, test screenings used a mechanically linked soundtrack (either 35mm or 17.5mm with 35mm sprocket holes, as opposed to the final optical (or magnetical) soundtrack-on-film, so the soundtrack and in-sync wouldn't be affected by the splice as long as no frames are missing. This all takes place in LA where all kinds of specialized labs are, but still, this is a very complex procedure involving highly specialized optical step printer facilities. Can't find those in a matter of hours, not even in LA.See more »
Quotes:
Lt. Columbo:Finally got some hard evidence! What is that, Doctor? I'll be a son of a gun. A calibration converter. Do you have a key to that case? looks like a .22. Fit nicely into a .45 automatic. That's why the barrel and chambers were clean when ballistics checked out the gun... That's a lovely touch. A converter. I never figured on a converter. And one hidden in a lamp! Doc... I would a sworn you had a gun hidden in here. And I was trying to smoke you out... But I never figured on this.
Dr. Bart Keppel:A subliminal cut. You used a subliminal cut!
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
References High Plains Drifter (1973)See more »

FAQ

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
Robert Culp is on a killing spree again!, 7 June 2008
Author: Boba_Fett1138 from Groningen, The Netherlands

One year after Robert Culp appeared as the killer in the Columbo movie "Columbo: The Most Crucial Game" he returns once more to play the role of killer in this movie but in a totally different role this time of course. It was the third out of four Columbo movies he ever appeared in and I must say that he probably plays his best role in this movie. I don't any other actor besides Peter Falk appeared in so many different Columbo movies.

The movie itself is basically your average standard Columbo movie entry. No surprises and the movie stick to the usual successful formula. As a matter of fact I found the story to be even a bit tiresome at times since it reminded me a bit too much of other previous Columbo movies. Oh well, perhaps I've just seen a bit too many Columbo movies lately.

The story gets perhaps a bit too silly at times, especially toward its ending, which also makes this Columbo movie perhaps a bit more outdated than others. The story was written by Stephen J. Cannell, who is better known as the big man behind '80's hit-series "The A-Team".

It could be just me but I thought that this movie its atmosphere was perhaps also a bit darker than the usual Columbo movie. Nothing wrong with this though, it's just an observation. It can also have to do with the fact that the movie is mostly set indoors.

It's certainly the best Columbo movie that got directed by Richard Quine. It was his third and last Columbo movie he ever did. His first movie "Columbo: Dagger of the Mind" was perhaps the very worst Columbo movie ever made and his second "Columbo: Requiem for a Falling Star" was a below average entry. This movie is also lacking a certain style to make the movie more interesting than the average entry and is lacking too much in surprises to consider this one of the best Columbo movies.

Nevertheless, it's an obviously perfectly watchable one. Even though the story is formulaic it doesn't bore and is the reason why this movie is just as good to watch as any other standard Columbo movie.

7/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for "Columbo" (1968)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Goof? hipdadiddy
Any real subliminal cuts in this episode? scfc
Motive? tom_m_riddle2003
That wild sales movie?! paul-welty
it must have been the ones around the lamp.... ochinero
the double-breasted Robert Culp old_tv_guy
See more »

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