American Graffiti
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 42 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


How Simon Kinberg got 'Fantastic Four' collaborator Josh Trank into ‘Star Wars’ galaxy

8 August 2014 8:45 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

(Cbr) If you’re excited for Josh Trank’s "Star Wars" spinoff, there’s someone you should thank: Simon Kinberg. Kinberg and Trank are collaborators on Fox’s upcoming "Fantastic Four" reboot. Furthermore, Kinberg is part of Lucasfilm’s "Star Wars" brain trust, helping to write some of the films, as well as the "Star Wars Rebels" animated series. Speaking with Slash Film, Kinberg revealed that he was the one who connected Trank and Lucasfilm. “I spoke very highly of Josh to the Lucasfilm guys. They were interested in him because he, like Rian [Johnson, director of "Episode VIII"] and like Gareth [Edwards, director of a 2016 spin-off], is very much that next generation filmmaker,” Kinberg said. “He comes from a background of making a big movie without a big budget. Which I think is also, not that these movies … they’ll have huge budgets, but the sort of the tradition that George [Lucas] started was somebody that came from making "American Graffiti »

- Josh Wigler, Comic Book Resources

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Podcast: A Smackdown Companion w/ Dana Delany

1 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Dana Delany loves talking movies! You can see her next in "Hand of God" on Amazon PrimeYou've read the Supporting Actress Smackdown of 1973. Now hear its companion Podcast 

On this special episode of the podcast -- meant to enhance and extend the current Supporting Actress Smackdown conversation to include the films themselves -- Nathaniel welcomes two time Emmy winner Dana Delany (China Beach, Desperate Housewives, Body of Proof), as well as EW editor at large and "Five Came Back" author Mark Harris, "You Must Remember This" podcast goddess Karina Longworth, Bill Chambers from Film Freak Central, and Kyle Turner from The Movie Scene.

You'll want to listen to this one. Trust me on this: your week will not be complete until you hear Dana's Sylvia Sidney impression and Mark's childhood Exorcist story. 

Smackdown 1973

00:01 Introductions

02:45 American Graffiti: nostalgia, sexism, George Lucas, actors vs screenplay

13:15 Summer Wishes »

- NATHANIEL R

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Introducing Pt 2... Blair and Candy

28 July 2014 8:06 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Previously on "Introducing": Tatum, Sylvia & Madeline

It's just 3 days until the Supporting Actress Smackdown of 1973. Bless StinkyLulu for dreaming up this event years ago because it's still so fun. But first some unfinished introductions: how do Candy Clark and Linda Blair enter their movies. If you hadn't yet seen the movie would you be expecting an Oscar nomination from these first scenes? What do the scenes telegraph for first time viewing? 

Sure do love you.

Hi, Mom!

11½ minutes in. Meet "Regan" (Linda Blair in The Exorcist)

How fitting that she first appears in bed, since she'll spend the bulk of the movie in one albeit it under far more horrific circumstances than a good night's sleep. As the scene begins her mother Chris MacNeil (Ellen Burstyn) has heard noises in her Georgetown rental and checks on her daughter first. Sound asleep. But there's a telling pan left to the open window, »

- NATHANIEL R

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That's What I Call Movies: The Hits of '73

24 July 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

To give the impending Smackdown some context we're looking at the year 1973. Here's Glenn on tickets sold...

1973 was like the end of a box-office era. While year-end charts weren’t suffocated with superheroes, CGI natural disasters, and dystopian visions of futuristic societies for a little while yet, but 1973 was as far as I can tell the last year to not have a single now-traditional effects-driven film in the top ten hits of the year. Just one year later in 1974 the end-of-year charts would include the one-two punch The Towering Inferno and Earthquake (plus Airport '75), and 1975 essentially ushered in the modern era of the blockbuster with Jaws and since then it's been a steady increase.

Here is what the top ten films of 1973 looked like.

01 The Sting $156m 

02 The Exorcist $128m

03 American Graffiti $96.3m

04 Papillon $53.3

05 The Way We Were $45m

06 Magnum Force $39.7

07 Last Tango In Paris $36.1

08 Live And Let Die »

- Glenn Dunks

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Meet July's "Smackdown" Panelists

13 July 2014 9:04 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The Supporting Actress Smackdown of '73 arrives on July 31st, just over two weeks from now. You need to get your votes in too if you want to participate (instructions at the bottom of this post). If you've wandered in from elsewhere and are like, "What's a Smackdown?," here's how it started.

The Smackdown Panel for July

Without further ado let's meet our panel who will be discussing popular classics Paper Moon, The Exorcist, and American Graffiti as well as the more obscure title Summer Wishes Winter Dreams. All of the Supporting Actress nominees this Oscar vintage were first timers and so are our Smackdown panelists.

Special Guest

Dana Delany

Dana Delany is an actress working on stage, screen, television and now internet. She was last seen starring in "Body of Proof" on ABC. In August you can rate and review the pilot "Hand of God" in which she co-stars with Ron Perlman on Amazon. »

- NATHANIEL R

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Harrison Ford's 7 Greatest Roles

13 July 2014 6:58 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Legendary actor Harrison Ford Turns 72 today, and in his impressive career he has been responsible for developing two of the most iconic movie characters in American pop culture.

To celebrate the man who created so many characters we all desperate wished we could be growing up – and honestly still kind of wish we could be – we take a celebratory look at Harrison's seven greatest roles.

#7. Dr. Richard Kimble – The Fugitive

Ford plays a man wrongly convicted of his wife's murder who – due to random circumstance – escapes from custody in a frantic effort to find the real killer and clear his name. All the while, he's hunted down by Us Marshall Tommy Lee Jones, which would be terrifying for anyone.

Best Quote: "When I came home, there was a man in my house. I fought with this man. He had a mechanical arm. You find this man. You find this man."

#6. Bob Falfa – American Graffiti »

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'Dazed and Confused' (1993) - Best Movies #4

10 July 2014 10:47 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I can't remember if I saw Richard Linklater's Dazed and Confused when Universal unceremoniously dumped it into only 183 theaters on September 24, 1993, but seeing how it topped out at 191 theaters I have to assume I was among the masses that caught it on video shortly thereafter. No matter when I first saw it, I do remember when I fell in love with it. It was 1995, my freshman year in college and while I wasn't a teen of the '70s, it didn't take much to find a connection. My college roommate and I would damn near have this film playing on a loop, and while I can't speak for him, for me it hit home because while the film is centering on a junior high student's initiation into high school, I had a similar experience transitioning from high school to college. While many aspects of Dazed and Confused are teenage dreamworld scenarios, »

- Brad Brevet

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Interview: Mackenzie Phillips Lives Life One Day at a Time

9 July 2014 5:15 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The irony is, of course, that actress Mackenzie Phillips was in a notable 1970s sitcom called “One Day at a Time,” and that phrase often describes the struggles of living with addiction. Phillips talked to HollywoodChicago.com about living that life at the “Hollywood Show” Chicago.

Mackenzie Phillips was born in Alexandria, Virginia, the daughter of The Mamas & the Papas singer John Phillips and his first wife, Susan Adams. She was in a band at the age of 12, and was spotted by a casting agent. She auditioned for the breakthrough George Lucas film, “American Graffiti,” and won the role of Carol. Three years later, she won her signature role, that of Julie Cooper on the long-running situation comedy “One Day at a Time,” co-starring Valerie Bertinelli and Bonnie Franklin.

Mackenzie Phillips at the “Hollywood Show Chicago” in 2013

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

It was »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Exclusive Interview With Dave Green And Henry Gayden On Earth To Echo

3 July 2014 1:35 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Earth to Echo marks the feature directing and screenwriting debuts of Dave Green and Henry Gayden. A throwback to classics like E.T. and The Goonies, where it’s up to the children to save the day without any help from surrounding adults, the film follows three youngsters whose families are being forced out of their homes due to highway construction. As they are packing to move, the kids start receiving strange messages on their cell phones, leading them to ride their bikes out into the middle of nowhere. They eventually come across a small, friendly alien who’s stranded on Earth and is looking for a way back home.

Recently, at the La press day for the film, I had the chance to sit down for an exclusive interview with Green and Gayden to discuss Earth to Echo. Among other things, the friendly duo spoke about the challenges they faced on set, »

- Ben Kenber

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Can Lucas build a Legacy?

28 June 2014 3:26 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Martin Carr on whether George Lucas can build a legacy with ‘The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art’….

‘Narrative art’ is defined as something ‘that tells a story, either as a moment in an ongoing story or as a sequence of events unfolding over time’

George Lucas has retired apparently. Having sold his empire to Disney making him wealthier than a barely developed principality with minimal infrastructure, we are now being treated to phase two in the Lucas mid-life crisis.

When I first heard that Norman Rockwell, foremost painter of post war Americana was being placed alongside original Star Wars miniatures and props it made no sense. Rockwell was known for capturing perfect moments in life which told a story or narrative beyond the confines of the frame. How could Lucas have the temerity to place his work alongside that of a real artist?

Informally known as ‘The Lucas Museum of »

- Gary Collinson

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Watch: George Lucas' 'Electronic Labyrinth Thx 1138 4Eb' That Will Probably Be In The New Museum He's Opening

27 June 2014 7:24 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Before "Star Wars," before Indiana Jones and before "American Graffiti," George Lucas was just another film school kid trying to eke out a career. But it wouldn't take him long, with his student film kicking open the door that would lead to becoming one of the most influential blockbuster storytellers of all time. And now you can see where it all began. Though you might have seen it before, Open Culture freshly points us in the direction of "Electronic Labyrinth Thx 1138 4Eb," the short film Lucas made as a student, which showed his affinity for sci-fi tales centering on underdogs taking on oppressive authority. Lucas would expand the story to make "Thx 1138," his first feature film, but you can see the intriguing roots of his cinematic feature in this fifteen-minute take. And hey, with the director now planning to open the Lucas Museum Of Narrative Arts in Chicago »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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'Star Wars' Creator George Lucas Selects Chicago for Museum

25 June 2014 7:20 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

George Lucas has selected the Windy City as the site for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, which will contain the Star Wars creator's art and movie memorabilia. "I am humbled to be joining such an extraordinary museum community and to be creating the museum in a city that has a long tradition of embracing the arts," Lucas said in a statement. The film icon, whose writing and directing credits also include American Graffiti and the Indiana Jones series, hopes to open the museum in 2018.

'Star Wars' Spinoffs »

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George Lucas' Museum Of Narrative Art To Be Built In Chicago

24 June 2014 5:34 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

While many fans still feel he did his part to ruin his own reputation with the Star Wars prequels and special editions, George Lucas to this day remains one of the most important figures in film history. Not only did he bring us amazing franchises like Star Wars and Indiana Jones and make great titles like American Graffiti, he was also always on the forefront of both audio and visual technology, starting up labs like Industrial Light and Magic and Skywalker Sound. In all that time spent evolving the industry and and making money hand over fist, Lucas also began a collection of fantastic art and artifacts from history, and soon you'll be able to travel to Chicago to view it all. The Chicago Times is reporting that the Windy City has been chosen over both Los Angeles (Hollywood's home) and San Francisco (Lucas' and Ilm's home) to serve »

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Industrial Light & Magic pioneer Jim Nelson dies, aged 81

22 June 2014 6:24 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jim Nelson - who helped to launch Industrial Light & Magic with George Lucas - has died, aged 81.

Nelson, whose real name was James M Falkinburg, died June 18, and his family announced his death through an obituary in the Los Angeles Times. No other details about his death were made public.

The sound editor, producer and post-production editor worked on 21 films and 38 television series over the course of his career and is best known for helping to establish visual effects company Industrial Light & Magic, a division of Lucasfilm.

He also founded another post-production facility called Edit-Rite in 1965, and launched James Nelson Enterprises in 1972 so that he could produce his own films.

From 1975 to 1977, Nelson worked as the uncredited associate producer of Star Wars, during which time he looked after the management of Ilm and built the company by helping to make and acquire equipment for the films.

During his career, he »

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James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82

20 June 2014 5:03 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Nelson, a sound editor, supervising sound editor and producer for film and television with more than 180 credits, including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Exorcist” and “American Graffiti,” has died. He was 82.

Director Monte Hellman, on whose classic 1971 film “Two-Lane Blacktop” Nelson worked, said, “He was one of my closest, dearest friends. He’s worked on all my movies. His first work was in sound editing and he did that on all my movies and even on the last one, ‘Road to Nowhere,’ he came in as a consultant just to make sure everything was right because I just wouldn’t do anything without his approval.”

Nelson was the supervising sound editor, often uncredited, on some of the classics of 1960s and ’70s cinema: Richard Rush’s film “Psych-Out” and Rafelson’s classic “Head,” both in 1968; “Easy Rider” in 1969; Rafelson’s “Five Easy Pieces”; Dalton Trumbo’s “Johnny Got His Gun »

- Carmel Dagan

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James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82

20 June 2014 5:03 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Nelson, a sound editor, supervising sound editor and producer for film and television with more than 180 credits, including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Exorcist” and “American Graffiti,” has died. He was 82.

Director Monte Hellman, on whose classic 1971 film “Two-Lane Blacktop” Nelson worked, said, “He was one of my closest, dearest friends. He’s worked on all my movies. His first work was in sound editing and he did that on all my movies and even on the last one, ‘Road to Nowhere,’ he came in as a consultant just to make sure everything was right because I just wouldn’t do anything without his approval.”

Nelson was the supervising sound editor, often uncredited, on some of the classics of 1960s and ’70s cinema: Richard Rush’s film “Psych-Out” and Rafelson’s classic “Head,” both in 1968; “Easy Rider” in 1969; Rafelson’s “Five Easy Pieces”; Dalton Trumbo’s “Johnny Got His Gun »

- Carmel Dagan

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Are we losing interesting directors to blockbuster films?

18 June 2014 4:23 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Directors who've made maybe one interesting, successful small film soon get snapped up by the system. But at what cost to the industry?

Feature

Director Marc Webb put together the guts of (500) Days Of Summer, his debut feature, in his house. He worked on it behind closed doors, and by the time he got to the point where he was filming it, he knew what he wanted, he'd made key decisions, and could get on with it. Interference was in short supply, and the result felt like a breath of fresh air in a very crowded genre.

Then there's Gareth Edwards. When he came to make his first film, Monsters, he sat in his bedroom and did the visual effects work on his own computer. He didn't have much budget to play with, but he had his brain, and nobody looking over his shoulder offering 'creative input'. We suspect his computer wasn't a bad one, »

- sarahd

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N.W.A Biopic Casts Dr. Dre, Eazy-e for 'Straight Outta Compton'

16 June 2014 2:35 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Update: Universal announced in a statement that the biopic will be released in theaters on Aug. 14th, 2015.

In April, F. Gary Gray, director of the upcoming N.W.A biopic Straight Outta Compton, staged an open casting call to find actors to play the principal roles. Asked what he was looking for, the director said, "It's just a certain thing that a person from the hood has. When you watch American Idol and they have that 'It Factor' – there's a 'Hood Factor.' You get the authenticity when you're in an environment likes this, »

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Kickstart This: Teens from Reel Works Direct New Film '72Hours: A Brooklyn Love Story?'

16 June 2014 10:32 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

Reel Works, one of the leading youth media non-profits in the USA, is raising $20,000 on Kickstarter for their first feature length project. "72 Hours: A Brooklyn Love Story?" is an original feature length comedy created by teen filmmakers trained by Reel Works.  Based on their own lives, "72 Hours: A Brooklyn Love Story?" follows the intersecting stories of a group of Brooklyn teens over the course of three days as they search for connection, freedom and yes, love.  Think American Graffiti in Brownsville - a positive, complex depiction of real teens with real dreams and struggles – from their Pov. Twelve talented young filmmakers are »

- Rodney C. Parnther

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Ros Journal (6/10/14): Spielberg, Scorsese & Lucas... the Future of Movies Circa 1990

10 June 2014 11:14 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I came across something today that is endlessly fascinating, a "Siskel & Ebert" television special from 1990 where Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel sit down with Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. The discussion ranges from their careers, where they're going, where they've been, what they expect from the movies in the future, film preservation and the coming of high definition television introduced by Siskel saying, "You add a good sound system as well and some people may never want to go to a movie theater again." At the time, Scorsese's GoodFellas was the next film coming from the trio and he makes mention of his want to make The Age of Innocence, which would be released three years later. Spielberg's next film would be Hook (1991) and even talks of wanting to direct a Howard Hughes movie, which, of course, Spielberg would never make, but Scorsese would tackle in The Aviator fourteen years later. »

- Brad Brevet

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 42 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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