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5 items from 2012


Are TV’s American Remakes Of Foreign Series Getting Excessive?

30 September 2012 10:39 PM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Rachel Bennett

Television Editor & Columnist

***

Sunday night was the season two premiere of Showtime’s Homeland, and among my 12 reasons why you should tune in to the political drama, one is because it’s a foreign remake that works.

In case you missed it, Homeland is an American adaptation of the 2010 Israeli series Hatufim (Prisoners of War). “Both shows are very similar in the fact that they raise very relevant and timely questions in their societies,” says Homeland executive producer Gideon Raff, who also created Prisoners of War. Prisoners of War is a drama that follows soldiers as they readjust to their society in addition to the people who question the truth of their service.

However, Homeland is not an exact copy of Prisoners of War. The Showtime series features the overhanging threat of terrorism after 9/11, personified in character Sgt. Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis). This change in crafting Homeland »

- Rachel Bennett

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15 British Sitcoms That Americans Loved the Most

24 September 2012 8:24 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

While not all of the American populace purports to always understand British humor, it’s been an indelible part of the cultural landscape for decades. Whether the sophisticated stylings of Noel Coward or the outrageous offerings of French & Saunders, British television comedies (aka Britcoms) have provided countless hours of entertainment to legions of fans, and have even occasionally been adapted into historic mega-smashes (without ‘Til Death Us Do Part and Man About the House, we’d never have seen the likes of All in the Family and Three’s Company, after all). Fifteen of those shows will always immediately spring to mind and provide copious memories of cherished moments in front of the tube (or the telly, as it were).

15. To the Manor Born (1979-81)

Formulaic though it may have been (widowed aristocrat gives up ancestral estate after purchase by a supermarket magnate of Bratislavic descent, and moves with butler »

- Andrew Martin

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A movie version of Dad's Army?

16 August 2012 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

You may find the new Ben Stiller movie The Watch strangely familiar. But that's not necessarily a good thing

You might be forgiven for thinking that you've seen The Watch before. Not because Ben Stiller's character is the same uptight blowhard that he has played in everything for the past 15 years, or because Richard Ayoade is basically just Moss from The It Crowd again, or because Vince Vaughn remains content to sit back and bibble out the same directionless patter that has been his stock in trade for what seems like centuries.

No. The reason is because, once you've scraped away all the sex jokes and clanging Costco product placement, you're basically left with Dad's Army. Both are essentially stories about a group of ill-prepared middle-aged incompetents trying to escape the monotony of their day-to-day lives by fudging together a defence against an enemy they don't fully understand. With The Watch, »

- Stuart Heritage

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Is The Watch just a movie version of Dad's Army?

16 August 2012 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

You may find the new Ben Stiller movie The Watch strangely familiar. But that's not necessarily a good thing

You might be forgiven for thinking that you've seen The Watch before. Not because Ben Stiller's character is the same uptight blowhard that he has played in everything for the past 15 years, or because Richard Ayoade is basically just Moss from The It Crowd again, or because Vince Vaughn remains content to sit back and bibble out the same directionless patter that has been his stock in trade for what seems like centuries.

No. The reason is because, once you've scraped away all the sex jokes and clanging Costco product placement, you're basically left with Dad's Army. Both are essentially stories about a group of ill-prepared middle-aged incompetents trying to escape the monotony of their day-to-day lives by fudging together a defence against an enemy they don't fully understand. With The Watch, »

- Stuart Heritage

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Six to watch: TV flatmates

17 April 2012 4:27 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From Not Going Out's flatmate from hell Lee Mack, to Peep Show's Mark and Jez, and the Friends cast – we run down our favourite TV flatmates. Have we missed any out?

Friday nights are fast turning into something of a one-man show for Lee Mack. Not only is he appearing once more with Rob Brydon and co as one of the regular panelists BBC1's Would I Lie to You but he's also back playing a fictionalised version of himself in Not Going Out. In the deliciously silly sitcom, Mack plays an ageing slacker who's got a decent case for claiming to be one of the worst fictional flatmates to have graced the small screen. But he's got stiff competition. The schedules have played host to a gaggle of rent-sharers down the years, but who has done it best? From psychopathic squatters to rib-ticklingly funny roomies, join us as »

- Daniel Bettridge

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5 items from 2012


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