This show was preceded by a 7-episode summer series in 1972, titled "The Bobby Darin Amusement Company." When the show premiered as a regular series, in January 1973, it was titled simply, ... See full synopsis »
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1973  
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Himself - Host 13 episodes, 1973
...
 Himself / ... 12 episodes, 1973
Roger Carroll ...
 Himself - Announcer / ... 10 episodes, 1973
Geoff Edwards ...
 Himself / ... 8 episodes, 1973
Tommy Amato ...
 Himself / ... 7 episodes, 1973
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Storyline

This show was preceded by a 7-episode summer series in 1972, titled "The Bobby Darin Amusement Company." When the show premiered as a regular series, in January 1973, it was titled simply, "The Bobby Darin Show" (But it kept the name "Amusement Company" for the production company name, listed at the end credits).The show features Darin playing characters in vignettes with his guest stars and co-stars --with the women, he plays Groucho Marx, a favorite impression in those days; he and his friend, Richard ("Dick") Bakalyan, portray a couple of guys from "the old Neighborhood"--Angie and Carmine, who converse about various things. Darin has a singing duet with his beautiful female guest star every week (Nancy Sinatra, Connie Stevens, Cloris Leachman, Freda Payne, Helen Reddy, Petula Clark, and more), whilst gazing into their eyes, sexily. These sizzling duets included: Cloris Leachman, Petula Clark and Freda Payne; Connie Stevens' duet with him was less sexy than very friendly and joyous...

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Genres:

Comedy | Music

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Release Date:

19 January 1973 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El show de Bobby Darin  »

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1.33 : 1
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One of network television's best variety shows
28 March 1999 | by See all my reviews

Neil Young cited him as one of his influences and called him a genius, but Bobby Darin is too often lumped together with such bland performers as Paul Anka and Frankie Avalon. Nothing could be further from the truth. Darin was one of pop music's most gifted practioners, but the remarkable ease with which he moved from rock and rolling teen idol, to finger snapping crooner, to sensitive folk rocker made him difficult to pigeonhole. Some critics took the easy way out by branding him a phony. His music contradicts that charge. Whether singing one of his own excellent compositions ("Dream Lover," "Simple Song of Freedom"), or interpreting the works of others ("Mack the Knife," Tim Hardin's "If I Were a Carpenter"), Darin was always an artist of the first rank. He was also an exceptional actor, earning a well-deserved Oscar nomination for "Captain Newman M.D." and more than holding his own against Sidney Poitier in the dynamic "Pressure Point." His short-lived NBC variety series (which aired in the year of his death) did not display all of his talents nor his versatility as well as it might have, but it was one of network television's best variety shows. The final episode, a concert special with Darin and Peggy Lee, is certainly deserving of release on video.


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