IMDb > Trafic (1971)
Trafic
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Trafic (1971) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Jacques Tati (original scenario) and
Jacques Lagrange (artistic collaboration) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Trafic on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
11 December 1972 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Mr. Hulot drives a recreational vehicle from Paris to Amsterdam in his usual comic, disasterous style. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Last but not least See more (18 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Jacques Tati ... Monsieur Hulot (as Mr. Hulot)
Marcel Fraval ... Truckdriver
Honoré Bostel ... Director of ALTRA
François Maisongrosse ... François (as F. Maisongrosse)
Tony Knepper ... Mechanic
Franco Ressel
Mario Zanuelli
Maria Kimberly ... Maria

Directed by
Jacques Tati 
 
Writing credits
Jacques Tati  original scenario and
Jacques Lagrange  artistic collaboration and
Bert Haanstra  participation

Produced by
Robert Dorfmann .... producer
 
Original Music by
Charles Dumont 
 
Cinematography by
Eduard van der Enden  (as Edward van den Enden)
Marcel Weiss 
 
Film Editing by
Maurice Laumain 
Sophie Tatischeff 
Jacques Tati (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Adrien De Rooy 
 
Costume Design by
Jacques Esterel 
 
Makeup Department
Gert Van Den Berg .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Georges Laurent .... production manager
Wim Lindner .... production manager
Marcel Mossotti .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Alain Fayner .... assistant director
Roberto Giandalia .... assistant director
Marie-France Siegler .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Hugo Van Baren .... carpenter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Alain Curvelier .... sound
Jean Nény .... sound mixer (as Jean Neny)
Ed Pelster .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Christian Dupré .... assistant camera
Paul Rodier .... camera operator
René Schneider .... assistant camera
Peter Smaling .... assistant camera
Anton van Munster .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
Patricia Nény .... assistant editor
Claude Plouganou .... synchronization
Patrick Raynaud .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Bernard Gérard .... conductor
 
Other crew
Juliette Wuidart .... administrator
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
96 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The end scene (people walking with umbrellas between parked cars) was shot on the parking lot of the then still functioning Amsterdam Ford factory.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: Several (Dutch) license plates can be seen on various different vehicles, sometimes even in the same shot. For instance the license plate "FT-92-65" can be seen in the petrol station scene on both a Peugeot 504 and a Chrysler 180. Later the same plate is on a Peugeot 204 passing in front of the exhibition center. In the "road rage" scene the number 76-04-NF is on both the Renault 16 and the Citroën ID. Shortly after the same plate is on an Opel Kadett parked in front of the exhibition center.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Traffic Jam (2013)See more »

FAQ

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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
Last but not least, 3 September 2010
Author: Ilpo Hirvonen from Finland

Trafic certainly isn't the last film by Jacques Tati, but it sure is the last successful and well known one. Mostly because it is his last film with his standard character, Monsier Hulot. After Trafic Tati still directed the television Sweden-France co production Parade (1974) and started making the sports-documentary Forza Bastia, which his daughter, Sophie Tatischeff edited and finished in 2002. But I personally like to see Trafic as his last film, as his cinematic legacy.

The plot of Trafic is very simple; Mr. Hulot, car driver and the PR girl have to take a new car to an exhibition in Amsterdam. They arrive few days late - the only actual exhibition is at the customs. The world of Jacques Tati is full of gags, he doesn't spend much time with his stories, but he writes his gags for years. And the pleasantly surprising thing is how the gags are made - they aren't taken too far, as they often are in comedies of today. Dozens of events happen at the same time, dozens of people get in these and by coincidence they come across with each other.

The destruction of old core values and habitat have been common themes for Jacques Tati. But in Play Time (1967) and Trafic (1971) he goes far deeper in the mechanization of life. Play Time showed us the futuristic Paris cursed by globalization. It would be too superficial to see Play Time simply just as a satire of urban living and modern society. In Trafic we see that Tati doesn't build that big a difference between urban and rural living. People come across with same kind of situations, troubles and madness. I think Play Time is his highest achievement and it's so much more than just a satire about modern society. In Play Time's postmodern Paris and in Trafic's highway the individual finds the very same challenges.

Trafic is basically a satire about mass industry - cars are built and built so long until the consumers are satisfied, which will never happen. This is the age people live their lives with avarice. Just as Mon oncle so is Trafic about consumer hysteria - the customs scene is a great example of this. The mechanization of life is the main theme in Play Time and in Trafic - in Trafic, once again, the customs scene is the greatest example of this, but it can be seen in just about every scene. For instance the randomness of relationships, which is a reflection of the twisted relation between work and the mechanization of life.

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