IMDb > Super Fly (1972)
Super Fly
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Super Fly (1972) More at IMDbPro »

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Super Fly -- Charismatic, big-time Harlem cocaine dealer Youngblood Priest drives expensive cars, keeps a downtown white woman, and plansone last big score to escape his life of violence.

Overview

User Rating:
6.5/10   4,355 votes »
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Popularity: ?
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Director:
Writer:
Phillip Fenty (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Super Fly on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
4 August 1972 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Never a dude like this one! He's got a plan to stick it to The Man! See more »
Plot:
The daily routine of cocaine dealer Priest who wants to score one more super deal and retire. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Gritty, dark, dirty and good. See more (58 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Ron O'Neal ... Priest
Carl Lee ... Eddie

Sheila Frazier ... Georgia (as Shiela Frazier)

Julius Harris ... Scatter
Charles McGregor ... Fat Freddie (as Charles MacGregor)
Nate Adams ... Dealer
Polly Niles ... Cynthia
Yvonne Delaine ... Mrs. Freddie
Henry Shapiro ... Robbery Victim
K.C. ... Pimp
James G. Richardson ... Junkie (as Jim Richardson)
Make Bray ... Junkie
Al Kiggins ... Police
Bob Bonds ... Police
Fred Ottaviano ... Police (as Fred Rolaf)

Alex Stevens ... Police
Harry Manson ... Police
Floyd Levine ... Police
Sig Shore ... Deputy Commissioner (as Mike Richards)
Chris Arnett ... Coke Buyer
Cecil Alonzo ... Militant
Gene Chambers ... Militant
John Williams ... Militant
E. Preston Reddick ... Karate Instructor
Lorraine Horn ... Mother In Apartment
Nick Sands ... Contracted Man
Bob Richards ... Contracted Man
Nita Michaels ... Hooker
Vicki McLaughlin ... Hooker

Curtis Mayfield ... Himself (The Curtis Mayfield Experience)
Henry Gibson ... Himself (The Curtis Mayfield Experience)
Lucky Scott ... Himself (The Curtis Mayfield Experience)
Craig McMullen ... Himself (The Curtis Mayfield Experience)
Tyrone McCullough ... Himself (The Curtis Mayfield Experience)

Directed by
Gordon Parks Jr. 
 
Writing credits
Phillip Fenty (written by)

Produced by
Sig Shore .... producer
Irving Stimler .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Curtis Mayfield 
 
Cinematography by
James Signorelli (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Bob Brady 
 
Costume Design by
Nate Adams 
 
Makeup Department
James Farabee .... makeup artist
Walter Fountain .... hair stylist (as Walter Fountaine)
Webster McKnight .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Cecil Alonzo .... assistant production manager
Nolan Constantine .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Candace Allen .... second assistant director
Kurt Baker .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Tom Jung .... poster designer (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jerry Baker .... boom operator
Bob Brady .... sound effects editor
Harry Lapham .... sound
 
Stunts
Erik Cord .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Harry Madsen .... stunt performer (uncredited)
Alex Stevens .... stunts (uncredited)
Jesse Wayne .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Alex Fernbach .... chief grip
Michael Lesser .... gaffer
Gordon Parks Jr. .... photographer: still sequence
Santiago Perales .... lighting
Minervino Rojas .... camera operator
Robert D. Shulman .... chief electrician (as Bob Shulman)
 
Editorial Department
Fredericka Taylor .... apprentice editor
 
Music Department
Bob Brady .... music editor
Curtis Mayfield .... music arranger
Curtis Mayfield .... orchestrator
Johnny Pate .... conductor
 
Other crew
David Parks .... unit publicist
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
93 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:RC (original rating) | Australia:R18+ (re-rating on appeal) | Canada:14A | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:16 | Netherlands:18 (orginal rating) | Netherlands:18 (original rating) | New Zealand:R18 | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video rating) (1988) | USA:R

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Star Ron O'Neal didn't like the cocaine montage. In an E! True Hollywood Story interview, he said it so glorified drug use, the montage was akin to a "commercial for cocaine."See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: The number of men attacking Priest in the final fight scene varies from shot to shot, though, from the angles used, there should be a consistent number.See more »
Quotes:
Youngblood Priest:You better take real good care of me. Nothing, nothing better happen to one hair on my gorgeous head. Can you dig it?See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Freddy's DeadSee more »

FAQ

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4 out of 7 people found the following review useful.
Gritty, dark, dirty and good., 14 August 2006
Author: spacemonkey_fg from Puerto Rico

Ill be darned if this film wasn't the mother of all Blaxploitation films.

The story is about this drug dealer called Priest Youngblood. He has a good business built for himself by selling cocaine out on the streets of New York city. He and his buddy Eddie have made a small fortune with their dealing and now Priest is ready to bow down and get out of the drug dealing business, but not before doing one last deal. Buy a bunch of coke cheap and make a bunch of money fast. Will his buddy Eddie be okay with that, will the hustler lifestyle let Priest Youngblood go free? And a better question would be, does he really want to leave that lifestyle behind?

I was expecting a crappy blaxploitation flick for some reason. A bore fest with nothing that would surprise me. Boy was I wrong! This film is exceptionally well written. The dialog rings so true in many scenes that I had no choice but to sing praises for this movie as I was watching it. Phillip Fenty the writer, focused on giving these characters dialog that would sound like real people talking real jive from the streets. I mean when you hear these guys doing a deal, it most certainly sounds like the way it could have really gone down in the streets of New York in the 70s. So be ready for some groovy dialog, thats not only genuine to the era, but also adds a level of reality to the proceedings. Of special notice is a dialog that goes on between Eddie and Priest, in this sequence Eddie tries to convince Priest to stay in the business and make more millions, to live the American dream of having eight track players and TV's in every room. It was just amazing. There's more little speeches like that one spread through out the movie that are really quite excellent.

Visually speaking the movie looks gritty. I mean, grind house cinema was invented by movies such as this one. The streets look like real streets and by that I mean, dark, dirty and rat infested. Its not like todays over stylized films that look slick and pretty yet take away the level of reality from films. Not Superfly though, its quite evident that this film was filmed in the real streets of New York back in the 70s when Queens and The Bronx looked like crap. There's no fancy lighting here or anything, this place looks dangerous, for real. And the film did an excellent job of capturing the feel and stink of New York back in those days. Right from the opening credits when we see Priest parading around the city in his pimped up pink Cadillac to visiting some real nightclubs in New York playing some funked out tunes! That sequence in the club where a real live funk/jazz band is playing totally transported me to that era. The movie just absorbs the 70s and basically just keeps it in this little time capsule perfectly preserved for your viewing enjoyment. And how could this director (Gordon Sparks Jr.) not make a movie as cool as this when his daddy (Gordon Sparks Senior.) was the one responsible for Shaft? There's no doubt that this movie is sleazy, its grind house AND blaxploitation all rolled up into one! The characters aren't nice and perfect, in fact they are the sleaziest, baddest mothers to walk the streets of New York. Even our main character Priest Youngblood spends most of the film stuffing his nostrils with cocaine every five minutes. And I mean this literally not figuratively. They are all drug dealers and coke heads, pimps and crooks, kinda reminded me a lot of Sin City. Only this isn't some CGI fictional city, this is N.Y. C! And yet, the cool thing about this film is that it is sleazy, and gritty yet it has a certain style in its direction that is very hard to ignore. There's this one scene in particular that really blew me away in which we see Priest and Eddie moving on up in the drug dealing business by a series of photo montages that were really amazing. And after I saw this film I had no doubt in my mind where Blow got some of its ideas from.

Ron O Neal absolutely dominates this movie as Priest Youngblood. The badass drug dealing cool dude who everyone looks up to and fears. The guy moving up in the dealing world and you better look out and not mess with him. He is an anti-hero cause I have to admit about half way through the movie I couldn't believe that I was actually rooting for a freaking coke dealer who got high on his own supply! What I mean to say by all this is that this character is highly memorable and will have you rooting for him in no time flat, despite his despicable lifestyle.

But above all else, the film had a good story. The bad guy wanting to get out and live with his girl. But can he escape? Will he? Or was this all he was born to do? Rent this movie and find out. This is without a doubt THE best blaxploitation film I have ever seen and highly recommend it to those who enjoy gritty, dark and funky gangster films from the seventies.

Rating: 4 out of 5

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