IMDb > Baron Blood (1972)
Gli orrori del castello di Norimberga
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Baron Blood (1972) More at IMDbPro »Gli orrori del castello di Norimberga (original title)

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Baron Blood -- Open-ended Trailer from Leone International

Overview

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6.0/10   1,698 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Vincent Fotre (screenplay)
Vincent Fotre (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Baron Blood on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 October 1972 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
SPECIAL NOTICE: The management disclaims any responsibility for patrons who suffer (A) APOPLECTIC STROKES, (B) CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGES, (C), or (D) FAINTING SPELLS during the shockingly gruesome scenes in this film. See more »
Plot:
A young man, Peter, returns to Austria in search of his heritage. There he visits the castle of an ancestor... See more » | Full synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(23 articles)
Captain America History 101 – Redux
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The Ten Best Captain America Artists (Part 1)
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Uncle Creepy's Blu Christmas Buyer's Guide 2013
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User Reviews:
An excellent tribute to the classic Hollywood horror films of the 1930's See more (48 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Joseph Cotten ... Baron Otto von Kleist / Alfred Becker

Elke Sommer ... Eva Arnold

Massimo Girotti ... Dr. Karl Hummel
Rada Rassimov ... Christina Hoffmann
Antonio Cantafora ... Peter Kleist
Umberto Raho ... Inspector (as Humi Raho)
Luciano Pigozzi ... Fritz (as Alan Collins)
Dieter Tressler ... Mayor Dortmundt
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Pilar Castel ... Madeleine, the doctor's assistant (uncredited)
Gustavo De Nardo ... Dr. Werner Hessler (uncredited)
Nicoletta Elmi ... Gretchen Hummel (uncredited)
Irio Fantini ... (uncredited)
Rolf Hädrich ... Auctioner (uncredited)
Kathy Leone ... Woman on the aircraft (uncredited)
Maurice Poli ... Land surveyor (uncredited)
Helena Ronee ... Elisabeth Hölle (uncredited)
Valeria Sabel ... Martha Hummel (uncredited)
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Directed by
Mario Bava 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Vincent Fotre  screenplay
Vincent Fotre  story

Produced by
Samuel Z. Arkoff .... executive producer
Alfredo Leone .... producer
 
Original Music by
Les Baxter (US version)
Stelvio Cipriani 
 
Cinematography by
Mario Bava (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Carlo Reali 
 
Art Direction by
Enzo Bulgarelli 
 
Makeup Department
Rossana Gigante .... hair stylist
Silvana Petri .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Bruno Frascà .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lamberto Bava .... assistant director
 
Special Effects by
Franco Tocci .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Emilio Varriano .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
William A. Bairn .... script (US version)
Franco Tocci .... effects double: Baron Blood (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Gli orrori del castello di Norimberga" - West Germany (original title)
"The Torture Chamber of Baron Blood" - , USA (long title)
See more »
Runtime:
Italy:98 min | USA:90 min | Argentina:92 min
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:M | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Germany:16 | Italy:VM14 | Netherlands:16 | Norway:16 (cut) | UK:15 (video rating) | USA:PG | USA:Unrated (uncut video version)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Cameo: [Alfredo Leone]can be seen seated behind Antonio Cantafora in the opening scenes aboard the Pan Am 747.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Eva's hairstyle markedly changes in a matter of minutes: from the dinner scene at Karl's house to just a few minutes later when she and Peter are inside the castle, her hair goes from a wavy perm to being nearly straight-combed.See more »
Movie Connections:

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8 out of 9 people found the following review useful.
An excellent tribute to the classic Hollywood horror films of the 1930's, 2 February 2005
Author: k_t_t2001 from Canada

Mario Bava's BARON BLOOD is a fine a tribute to the monster movies of Hollywood's golden age. So evocative of that period is this film that it takes not even a moment's thought to mentally recast Boris Karloff as the Baron, Nan Grey as his intended victim and to tune away the vivid Technicolor into haunting black and white.

As in FRANKENSTIEN or THE MUMMY, the evil in the film is unwittingly unleashed upon the world by the film's hero. In this case it is American Peter Kleist, who returns to the German castle of his ancestor Baron Otto Von Kleist. Even though he is aware that his ancestor, nicknamed "Baron Blood" was a sadistic monster who butchered and tortured the people of the countryside, Peter foolishly recites an ancient spell capable of resurrecting the Baron. The restored Von Kleist immediately resumes his homicidal ways, and now Peter, assisted by the beautiful Elke Sommer as a local historian, must find a way to undo what he has thoughtlessly wrought.

In the classic horror films of the 1930's the monsters were iconic and unforgettable, while the heroes were bland and almost entirely irrelevant. After all, who remembers who played the "hero" opposite Lugosi in Dracula or Karloff in THE MUMMY? (For trivia's sake it was David Manners in both films.) No, the villain/monster may have spent much of the picture lurking about off screen, or skulking in the shadows, but nevertheless he was always indisputably the star of the show.

BARON BLOOD maintains this link to its cinematic forbearers. Antonio Cantafora's Peter Kleist is satisfactory, but eminently forgettable, while Joseph Cotton, obviously having a ball, is terrific in his villainous role. Cotton's performance as the resurrected Von Kleist is spot on perfect, filled with evil charm and malevolent glee. He dominates the screen in the best tradition of the movie monsters of old.

In fact, there is only one significant departure from the classic monster films. Even in the days before the Hayes Commission, blood and gore were rarely seen and usually only suggested in Hollywood motion pictures. BARON BLOOD was produced without such restrictions and, though mild when compared to more recent horror films, it does contain some explicit moments that would have been completely unacceptable in the 1930's. Even as a tribute to the grand old days, it must remembered that BARON BLOOD was produced to appeal to a contemporary 1970's audience. Bava however realized that things modern will inevitably intrude upon the classic, and made light of this by placing soda pop machines in the halls of the Gothic Von Kleist castle and having prerecorded screams available in the Baron's torture chamber at the flip of a switch.

Not as arty as LISA AND THE DEVIL, not as graphic as BAY OF BLOOD, BARON BLOOD is often unjustly overlooked, or simply dismissed as a minor effort of Mario Bava's later period. Such hasty judgments do the film a great disservice. If BARON BLOOD has less of the striking cinematography of Bava's best films, it must be argued that such innovation would be out of place in a film striving to recapture the look and atmosphere of the original Hollywood horror movies. If one accepts the movie for what it is, a fine tribute to the genre's past, then BARON BLOOD is a great success, both as a homage and as work unto itself.

BARON BLOOD has been released in numerous VHS and laserdisc editions. The DVD release from Image Entertainment is probably the best example of the film currently available, featuring an uncut 1.85:1 widescreen presentation of the film, complete with the original European musical score, which was replaced when the film was released theatrically in North America.

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