7.4/10
352
5 user 3 critic

Malcolm X (1972)

James Earl Jones narrates this fascinating and moving documentary about the life of the assassinated black leader through various sources.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (screen adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Biographical Narration (voice)
...
Eulogy (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Ali ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Leon Ameer ...
Himself (archive footage)
Vida Blue ...
Himself (archive footage)
H. Rap Brown ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Rap Brown)
John Carlos ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Eldridge Cleaver ...
Himself (archive footage)
Ella Collins ...
Herself - Remarks After Death of Malcolm X (archive footage)
...
Herself (archive footage)
Lee Evans ...
Himself - 1968 Olympics (archive footage) (as L. Evans)
Charles Evers ...
Himself (archive footage)
James Farmer ...
Himself - Remarks After Death of Malcolm X (archive footage)
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Storyline

James Earl Jones narrates this fascinating and moving documentary about the life of the assassinated black leader through various sources.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

PG
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 May 1972 (USA)  »

Box Office

Gross:

$48,100,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (Technicolor)
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Did You Know?

Connections

Referenced in Asterix and Obelix Meet Cleopatra (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Niggers Are Scared of Revolution
Written by David Nelson (uncredited), Gylan Kain (uncredited) and Abiodun Oyewole (uncredited)
Performed by The Last Poets
See more »

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User Reviews

 
the man who never sold out....
31 July 2006 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

a gripping documentary of the old school (subject centred) we see Malcolm in the raw for most of the footage is him speaking at rallies and direct to the media of the day.

A great intro to Malcolm's early beliefs influenced by the black Muslim movement, and his development into an independent thinker, who had to stand alone, and ultimately pay the price of turning his back on the narrow minded and self seeking Elijah Mohammad.

the fire and intensity of Malcolm x never seems to have dimmed in all his speeches and interviews, he focused the whole time on the one great goal: the raising and liberation of the black consciousness to acts of self determination.

he was a man who struggled perpetually for others, as the film shows abundantly. his great love for mankind unfolds before the viewer in a way that will doubtless be a surprise to those who have only heard the company line; that Malcolm was some kind of 'racist in reverse' or that he advocated violence for violence sake.

the and of the film with latter day opinions that his assassination was state-sponsored is probably not in doubt, even tho in retrospect it has become clear that the black Muslim movement was certainly the 'hand that fired the gun'.

the final analysis: that Malcolm died as he did will always be less important than the fact that he lived as he did: a man of unerring courage drawn from the deep well of spiritual quest for kinship with God and man. he stands as an inspiring example of how to live, without swallowing our tongues in fear at those who would have us live a life of lies so that we can conspire to cover up their lies as well.... so when you know the truth, speak out!


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