Junior Bonner
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2014 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008

2 items from 2014


Lumière Festival Continues to Celebrate Female Filmmakers with Ida Lupino Tribute

14 October 2014 12:43 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Now in its third year, the Lumière Festival’s ongoing Permanent History of Women Filmmakers section isn’t a series of disconnected annual retrospectives — its three editions thus far build a chronological narrative of female innovation behind the camera. In 2012, the festival appropriately began at the beginning, celebrating narrative cinema pioneer Alice Guy; 2013 kept the focus French, as Impressionist filmmaker Germaine Dulac was put under the spotlight.

This year’s Lumiere fest expands the gender conversation beyond its own borders, with Hollywood feminist trailblazer Ida Lupino the subject of 2014’s section.

British-born actor and filmmaker Lupino’s onscreen work alone would earn her a place on the historical honor roll of American studio cinema: Her intelligent, decidedly modern star presence was put to memorably flinty use in such films as Raoul Walsh’s “High Sierra” and Sam Peckinpah’s “Junior Bonner.”

Yet it was as a helmer that Lupino did her most influential work. »

- Guy Lodge

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Big Flops For Big Stars: A Look Back At ABC's Ill-fated Venture Into Feature Films

21 July 2014 3:35 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Woody Allen's Take the Money and Run was pivotal in launching his career as a credible actor and leading man. Although considered a comedy classic today, the 1969 film actually lost money at the time of its release.

By Brian Hannan

All you need is top stars and top directors and making movies is easy. Surely you couldn’t miss with a line-up that included Sean Connery, Steve McQueen, Michael Caine, Dustin Hoffman, Lee Marvin, Omar Sharif, and directors of the calibre of Robert Aldrich (hot after The Dirty Dozen), John Boorman (Point Blank) and Woody Allen. Or so ABC must have thought when it set up a movie division in the late 1960s. Delving into the archives recently, I discovered that Sam Peckinpah’s rodeo picture Junior Bonner (1972) starring Steve McQueen was a box office stinkeroo. The picture lost $2.8m (about $15m in today’s money). Not just on domestic release, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2014 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008

2 items from 2014


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