Joe Kidd (1972) - News Poster

(1972)

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Canadian Pacific

Randolph Scott fights to let the railroad go through in this old-fashioned rip-snorting action adventure movie, the kind where shooting bad guys means never having to say you're sorry. Jane Wyatt gets top billing but the big burner on this prairie is newcomer Nancy Olson, who puts more sex appeal into her homegrown heroine than all of her later roles combined. Canadian Pacific Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1949 / Color /1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / Street Date August 9, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Randolph Scott, Jane Wyatt, J. Carrol Nash, Victor Jory, Nancy Olson, Robert Barrat, Walter Sande, Don Haggerty, Grandon Rhodes, John Hamilton, George Chandler, Holmes Herbert, Norman Jewison, Chief Yowlachie. Cinematography Fred Jackman, Jr., Film Editor Philip Martin Art Direction Ernst Fegeé Original Music Dimitri Tiomkin Written by Jack DeWitt, Kenneth Gamet story by Jack DeWitt Produced by Nat Holt Directed by Edwin L. Marin Reviewed by Glenn Erickson All Randolph Scott movies aren't created equal,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cinema Retro Presents: "The American Westerns Of Clint Eastwood" Special Issue

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro proudly presents its latest "Movie Classics" special edition issue: "The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood", the perfect companion to our acclaimed special issue dedicated to the three Clint Eastwood Westerns directed by Sergio Leone.

"The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood" is a 116 page limited edition publication. Each of Eastwood's American Westerns is covered in detail in individual chapters:

"Hang "Em High" "Paint Your Wagon" "Two Mules for Sister Sara" "The Beguiled" "Joe Kidd" "High Plains Drifter" The Outlaw Josey Wales" "Pale Rider" "Unforgiven" Special section covering early film roles and TV Western appearances

Featuring hundreds of photographs, rare behind-the-scenes stills an movie poster art, including location photos (then and now) and even props that exist to this day in private collections!!

We are also very honored to present unseen movie poster designs by the legendary Bill Gold, who has overseen the advertising campaigns for most of Eastwood's films
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Actor Dick Van Patten Dead At Age 86

  • CinemaRetro
 

Dick Van Patten, the popular comedic character actor, has passed away at age 86. Patten was a child actor who eventually went on to perform in 30 Broadway shows. He also proved to be a popular presence on early TV shows such as "I Remember Mama". In the 1970s, he appeared on "The Love Boat" and a decade later had a hit show with "Eight is Enough". More recently, he co-starred on "Hot in Cleveland". Van Patten also made any number of hit feature films including such diverse fare as the Clint Eastwood western "Joe Kidd" and three movies with Mel Brooks: "High Anxiety", "Spaceballs" and "Robin Hood: Men in Tights". For more, click here. 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Dick Van Patten, ‘Eight Is Enough’ and ‘Love Boat’ Star, Dies at 86

Dick Van Patten, ‘Eight Is Enough’ and ‘Love Boat’ Star, Dies at 86
Dick Van Patten, who played the paterfamilias on the 1980s TV dramedy “Eight Is Enough,” died on Tuesday morning. He was 86.

Patten died at Saint John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. due to complications from diabetes.

The always-genial, round-faced actor also appeared in Disney films including “Freaky Friday” (the original, Jodie Foster version) as well as Mel Brooks comedies “High Anxiety,” “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and “Space Balls.”

Though long associated with television and film comedies, the actor spent a great deal of time onstage, making the first of his two dozen or so appearances on Broadway as a child back in 1937, in Kurt Weill’s “The Eternal Road.”

He had most recently appeared onscreen in a guest role as Lester on TV Land’s “Hot in Cleveland.” Other relatively recent credits include “7th Heaven” in 2004, “Arrested Development” in 2005, “That ’70s Show” in 2006 and “The Sarah Silverman Program
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Dick Van Patten, ‘Eight Is Enough’ Star, Dies at 86

Dick Van Patten, ‘Eight Is Enough’ Star, Dies at 86
Dick Van Patten, who played the paterfamilias on the 1980s TV dramedy “Eight Is Enough,” died on Tuesday morning. He was 86.

Patten died at Saint John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, Calif., due to complications from diabetes.

The always-genial, round-faced actor also appeared in Disney films including “Freaky Friday” (the original, Jodie Foster version) as well as Mel Brooks comedies “High Anxiety,” “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” and “Space Balls.”

Though long associated with television and film comedies, the actor spent a great deal of time on stage, making the first of his two dozen or so appearances on Broadway as a child back in 1937, in Kurt Weill’s “The Eternal Road.”

He had most recently appeared onscreen in a guest role as Lester on TV Land’s “Hot in Cleveland.” Other relatively recent credits include “7th Heaven” in 2004, “Arrested Development” in 2005, “That ’70s Show” in 2006 and “The Sarah Silverman
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gregory Walcott, ‘Plan 9 From Outer Space’ Star, Dies at 87

Gregory Walcott, ‘Plan 9 From Outer Space’ Star, Dies at 87
Gregory Walcott, who starred in several movies in the ’50s and early ’60s including, perhaps most notably, the critically panned “Plan 9 From Outer Space,” has died, his son announced on Facebook. He was 87.

“We said goodbye to my dad today,” wrote his son, “Men in Black” puppeteer Todd Mattox, on Friday. “He spent his life making people feel good.”

Walcott starred as pilot Jeff Trent in 1959’s “Plan 9 From Outer Space,” which is widely considered one of the worst films of all time. Despite its reputation, it gained a large cult following, which Walcott was reluctantly at the center of.

“I had done so many great films and worked with so many great directors that I didn’t want to be identified with such a piece of trash,” he said in a 1998 interview with Filmax magazine.

He starred alongside Bela Lugosi in the film. Lugosi, however, had died
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mr. Majestyk | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
To recall the cinema of Charles Bronson, one can’t get far without referencing his sterling epoch in 1970s era American film, a period eclipsed mightily by the star’s work with director Michael Winner. Kino Lorber resurrects one of the star’s lesser remembered titles, Mr. Majestyk, a 1974 action flick written by the great Elmore Leonard and directed by the illustrious Richard Fleischer, known for a varied career that included a penchant for true crime related titles (Compulsion; The Boston Strangler; 10 Rillington Place), and famed adaptations of pulpy novels, like Soylent Green and the infamous Mandingo. Unfortunately, Fleisher’s title opened one week prior to the juggernaut known as Death Wish back in July of 1974, and has perhaps been unfairly overshadowed ever since.

Bronson stars as Vince Majestyk, a humble melon farmer whose only desire is to harvest his crop of watermelons. A Vietnam veteran, Majestyk steps to in
See full article at ioncinema »

Check Out ‘The Clint Eastwood Stare Guide’ & Blu-Ray Collection Details

If there are any stares more prominent or cinematic than Clint Eastwood’s then we haven’t seen them. Today, we’ve got this remarkably entertaining infographic to celebrate the release of the Clint Eastwood: The Blu-ray Collection from Universal that teaches you how to recreate the famous stares from the man for yourself!

From The Director’s Squint to The “Are you kidding me?“, celebrate his iconic moments in this box set and give staring like Eastwood a go.

The Clint Eastwood Eight Movie Blu-ray Collection includes Coogan’s Bluff, Two Mules for Sister Sara, The Beguiled, Play Misty for Me, Joe Kidd, High Plains Drifter, Breezy and The Eiger Sanction all together in a beautiful box set, perfect for any fan or movie-buff. Own it now: http://amzn.to/1rKjUeB

By the way, Universal are also encouraging you to send your pictures of how you stare like
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Life Of Crime Trailer Manages To Feel Like Elmore Leonard

If you’re familiar with Elmore Leonard, the new trailer for Life of Crime will probably pull you in, even if the story doesn’t seem like his usual fare.

It’s hard to find the common thread that runs through 3:10 to Yuma, Joe Kidd, Get Shorty, Jackie Brown, and TV’s Justified (unless it just people generally being bad ass), but these and other titles that have come from Elmore Leonard’s works (if he didn’t pen the screenplay) are the kinds of stories that grab people with their characters. The latest, based on “The Switch,” is a strange twist on caper films that centers around a plot to kidnap a real estate developer’s wife to collect ransom. The catch is that he doesn’t especially want her back. With the mark not exactly looking to play ball, things get weird, and there’s no telling where we’ll end up.
See full article at AreYouScreening »

New DVD Blu-ray: 'Anchorman 2,' 'The Pirate Fairy,' 'Once'

  • Moviefone
Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues"

What's It About? Can Ron Burgundy and his team up their game to take on the 24-hour news cycle? Will they take a bite out of the Big Apple or choke? Will Ferrell, Steve Carell, Paul Rudd, David Koechner, and Christina Applegate return for more unclassy antics.

Why We're In: Anyone who's watched a Will Ferrell/Adam McKay film knows that the alternate and extended scenes are endlessly watchable. That goes double for "Anchorman 2," which was initially released as a PG-13 film and later upgraded to a "super-sized R."

Exclusive: Watch a scene from "Super-Sized R-Rated" Version of "Anchorman 2" (Video)

Rt 2 win #Anchorman2 on BluRay + NewsTeam mustache & autographed Sex Panther cologne! Rules: http://t.co/9EW8jlbjZe pic.twitter.com/N2YxpZygZT

- moviefone (@moviefone) March 31, 2014

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"Once"

What's It About? A
See full article at Moviefone »

Elmore Leonard, author of Out of Sight, 3:10 to Yuma, and Jackie Brown, has died

  • JoBlo
Elmore Leonard, the famed author of numerous gritty crime thrillers, has passed away at the age of 87 due to complications from a stroke. A Detroit native, known as "Dutch" amongst friends and family, Leonard leaves behind a tremendous legacy of work with more than 40 novels published, many of them adapted into films or TV shows. Among those adapted to the big screen are Joe Kidd with Clint Eastwood, Mr. Majestyk with Charles Bronson, Out Of Sight with George Clooney, 3:10 To Yuma...
See full article at JoBlo »

Elmore Leonard Suffers Stroke

  • Moviefone
Author Elmore Leonard, whose dark-crime books have been optioned into a slew of hit TV shows and movies, is currently recovering from a stroke in a hospital near his Detroit-area home. He is 87.

"Out of Sight," "Get Shorty," "Rum Punch" (released as "Jackie Brown"), and "Three-Ten to Yuma" are among Leonard's novels and short stories that have been adapted into films. He also originated the "Justified" character Raylan Givens, and he's penned several screenplays, such as the 1972 Clint Eastwood Western "Joe Kidd."

The movie "Life of Crime," based on his thriller "The Switch," is set to premiere at this year's Toronto Film Festival. Starring Jennifer Aniston, Mos Def, Tim Robbins, John Hawkes, and Isla Fisher, it's described as "a crime caper about two ex-cons whose plan to kidnap a real estate developer's wife doesn't go quite as smoothly as expected."

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Leonard's stroke "was not life-threatening.
See full article at Moviefone »

Joe Kidd

No-nonsense Western starring Clint Eastwood as a bounty hunter enlisted by ruthless land owner Robert Duvall to help quash an uprising of Mexican rebels. But joining a posse doesn't mean a man has to agree with its cause, and Joe soon senses a switch in his allegiances. With a script by crime ace Elmore Leonard and The Magnificent Seven director John Sturges holding the reins, it's no surprise that Joe Kidd delivers his words and deeds straight up.
See full article at Sky Movies »

Anthology Film Archives Tribute To Novelists/Screenwriters

  • CinemaRetro
Deborah Kerr in the classic ghost story The Innocents, screenplay by Truman Capote.

The Anthology Film Archives in New York is holding a unique film festival throughout the month of September honoring screenwriters who were best known for their work as novelists. Here are the details:

On this calendar we are highlighting the screenwriting work of writers best known as novelists – including pulp novelists like Richard Matheson, Donald Westlake, and Elmore Leonard, cult figures such as Don Carpenter and John Fante, and such highly respected authors as Truman Capote and Joan Didion. Paying homage to the long tradition of novelists trying their hand at writing for the movies, we will present a selection of films based not on these writers’ novels, but on their original screenplays (which are sometimes adaptations of other novelists’ work).

From The Pen Of is programmed in close collaboration with author/musician Alan Licht.

Very special thanks to Alan Licht,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Bruce Surtees obituary

Oscar-nominated cinematographer who worked on Lenny, Dirty Harry and The Beguiled

The American cinematographer Bruce Surtees, who has died aged 74, became known as "the prince of darkness" for his muted and often lugubrious style of lighting. However, while Surtees was well-suited to the nocturnal street scenes of Dirty Harry (1971), the Rembrandt-esque arrangements of The Beguiled (1971) and the claustrophobic interiors of Escape from Alcatraz (1979), all directed by Don Siegel, he was also at home with the wide open spaces of the western Joe Kidd (1972) and the surfing movie Big Wednesday (1978).

His deceptively simple black-and-white scheme for Lenny (1974), Bob Fosse's semi-documentary biopic of the comedian Lenny Bruce, earned Surtees an Oscar nomination. The film's compelling stand-up sequences owe almost as much to the expert lighting of the nightclub as they do to Dustin Hoffman's performance. As Hoffman paces the stage, chased by his own shadow, the light captures wisps of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hereafter review

Clint Eastwood takes a slightly different turn with his latest movie. Here's our take on Hereafter, which arrives in the UK today...

On the face of it, Hereafter might seem an odd fit for Clint Eastwood. A supernatural drama directed by the man who made his name through gritted teeth and a really big gun? 

Eastwood, however, has always been keen to confound expectations, alternating between films engineered to play to his strengths and those that might stretch them.

As early as 1971's The Beguiled, he was turning his image on its head, then went back to the day job with Joe Kidd in 1972, before 1973's Breezy showed his more sensitive side. A kind of 'one for me, one for them' arrangement way before Steven Soderbergh got in on the act.

But Hereafter isn't the big stretch it would appear to be. There's a big question hinted at within Peter Morgan
See full article at Den of Geek »

Vonetta McGee obituary

Actor famous for her roles in blaxploitation films of the 1970s

The actor Vonetta McGee, who has died aged 65 after a cardiac arrest, was a heroine of 1970s blaxploitation movies, but I pursued her because she had also appeared in the greatest of all Italian westerns, Sergio Corbucci's Il Grande Silenzio (The Great Silence). The year was 1983, and I was in the fortunate position of having a feature to direct: Repo Man. The cast was a large one for a low-budget movie. It included all types: method actors from New York, punks from the La hardcore scene, disgruntled Hollywood character actors and refugees from the theatre, but only one star, as I soon discovered.

Not that Vonetta behaved in a "starry" fashion. She was completely approachable and a professional, always one of the team. Nevertheless, of all the actors in my film, Vonetta was the one with the credits.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Happy Birthday, Clint Eastwood!

  • Cinematical
Happy Birthday, Clint Eastwood!
May31st is Memorial Day, but film fans might find another reason to celebrate, as it also happens to be Clint Eastwood's birthday. The granddaddy of all that is cool, quiet, and badass is turning 80 years old today. 80 years old. Ponder that for awhile, because it seems incredible, particularly since he's still as sharp, smart, and hardworking as ever. Sexy too! He may be 80 but he still has that incredible rakish smile, all the better because it was so rarely used on film.

After you're done honoring the sacrifices of our troops (don't think I mean that glibly), you might want to take two hours and celebrate Mr. Eastwood's birthday. TCM is hosting a marathon of Eastwood movies, beginning with his fresh-faced debut in The First Traveling Saleslady, continuing on through his trilogy with Sergio Leone, and finishing up with Magnum Force. Airing between is Richard Schickel's documentary The Eastwood Factor,
See full article at Cinematical »

Western Wednesdays: ‘The Train Robbers’

The Train Robbers has been sitting in my Netflix queue for ages, hoping every Tuesday night that I’ll finally pick it for a Western Wednesday. It may have stayed there forever had not Justin Gray suggested it. Gray, as you should know by now, is coauthor of the DC series Jonah Hex. If he says “You should watch The Train Robbers!”, you call up the Netflix queue, and then you apologize to John Wayne that you required someone to intercede on his behalf.

However about halfway through, I began wondering if I had picked the right movie. Nothing was happening. The villains were a dustcloud shrouded bunch who just thundered around, Ann-Margaret was getting on my nerves, the sidekicks were blurring together, and Wayne was just being Wayne. I checked the clock and was relieved to see there was only about 15 minutes left.

And in that 15 minutes, The Train Robbers becomes an epic,
See full article at The Flickcast »

Western Wednesdays: ‘The Ox-Bow Incident’

  • The Flickcast
Today’s Wednesday Western comes to you courtesy of a namedrop by the big man himself, Clint Eastwood. If Eastwood casually says The Ox-Bow Incident is a really good Western, you have to drop what you’re doing and watch it. (Considering it’s only one hour long, it’s pretty easy to find some time to do it!)

I can see why Eastwood likes Ox-Bow. There are shades of Hang ‘Em High and Unforgiven in it. It’s the kind of film that reminds me why I was so eager to explore this genre. We all tend to classify Westerns as rousing shoot-em-ups and masculine swagger, but there are a lot of dark, bitter stories hidden among the John Ford panoramas. Even this film is often billed as a Henry Fonda movie about cattle rustlers, giving the impression that it’ll be a classic horse opera. Nothing could be further from the truth.
See full article at The Flickcast »

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