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I, Monster (1971)

PG | | Horror | April 1973 (USA)
Christopher Lee stars in the Amicus production of "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" where the names have been changed to Dr. Marlowe and Mr. Blake. Lee as Dr. Marlowe experiments with intravenous ... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Marlowe / Blake
...
Mike Raven ...
Richard Hurndall ...
George Merritt ...
Kenneth J. Warren ...
Deane
Susan Jameson ...
Diane
Marjie Lawrence ...
Annie
Aimée Delamain ...
Landlady (as Aimee Delamain)
...
Boy in alley
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Storyline

Christopher Lee stars in the Amicus production of "Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde" where the names have been changed to Dr. Marlowe and Mr. Blake. Lee as Dr. Marlowe experiments with intravenous drugs that are supposed to release inner inhibitions. So comes forth Mr. Blake (also Lee) who gets more monstrous with each transformation (physically as well as personality). Peter Cushing plays his friend and colleague, Dr. Utterson. Written by Humberto Amador

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

April 1973 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El monstruo  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Given the source novel, it is unclear why the names of the central character have been changed. See more »

Goofs

At c. 53 minutes Utterson says he would recognise the exact details of the ornate head of Blake's cane. However he has only seen this cane for a fraction of a second, at night-time, when it was used to assault him earlier in the film. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Charles Marlowe: The face of evil is ugly to look upon. And as the pleasures increase, the face becomes uglier.
See more »

Connections

Version of Jekyll and Hyde... Together Again (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Eine Kleine Nachtsmusik
By Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (uncredited)
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Christopher Lee wearing a big smile? Now, that's scary!
13 January 2009 | by (the Draconian Swamp of Unholy Souls) – See all my reviews

With this feature, Amicus Studios (a British production company founded merely to cash in on the huge success of contemporary competitor Hammer, though with lower budgets and mainly specializing in anthology films) attempted to present its very own adaptation of the legendary and numerously retold novel "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde", by Robert Louis Stevenson. However, "I, Monster" turned out to be a rather curious movie and I honestly can't say for sure what it was that Amicus wanted to achieve and whether or not they succeeded in their effort. At first I assumed "I, Monster" was going to be only loosely inspired by the classic story, since there already are so many reminiscent versions available on the market and even more so because the screenplay changes the names of the protagonist from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde into Dr. Marlowe and Mr. Blake. But then it rapidly becomes obvious that this is actually one of the faithful adaptations of Stevenson's story, so that can't be an option. On a slightly off-topic note, in case you are looking for an offbeat and extremely loose interpretation of the same story, you can turn to the aforementioned Hammer again and check out "Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde". Maybe the original mission was to make the very first 3-D version of "Jekyll and Hyde", but that idea got abandoned in a fairly early stage as well and it's only still noticeable in some minor visual and cinematographic details. So, basically, all that remains is another redundant but nevertheless worthwhile re-enactment of a fantastic tale, once more pairing two of the greatest horror actors ever (Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee) and competently directed by one of the youngest filmmakers of that time. Stephen Weeks was still in his early twenties in 1971. I bet it must be a truly unique experience to give Lee and Cushing instructions on a film set on that age...

Lee and Cushing don't deliver their greatest performances here (far from it actually), but even at their most mediocre they nonetheless remain a joy to behold. Lee stars as Dr. Marlowe, a successful psychiatrist and devoted disciple of Sigmund Freud's theories. He firmly believes that mental illnesses can be caused by the repression of the true human nature (which is vile, mean and aggressive) and that both sides of the personality can easily be separated. He develops a drug, experiments on himself and gradually turns into a more relentless and incurable monster after each injection. His friends, including Peter Cushing as his attorney, want to help Dr. Marlowe but they automatically assume this mysterious Mr. Blake is an entirely different persona. The overall story is commonly known and this version doesn't feature any noteworthy differences. The doctor's transformations - mentally as well as physically - grow more monstrous, but the remarkable thing is he is the scariest during the earliest phases! Near the film's climax, Christopher Lee looks unrecognizable and heavily deformed but after the first couple of drug dosages he simply puts on a menacing and genuinely unsettling Joker-type of smile. Can you imagine Christopher Lee with a big smile like that? Now, THAT is scary stuff!


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