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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

4 items from 2017


Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

9 July 2017 5:56 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 70s —The Lesser Known Films

30 June 2017 10:59 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Two weeks ago I wrote about Film Forum’s retrospective of New York in the 70s and collected all the Polish posters I could find for the best known films in the series. This week I want to concentrate on the films which are less well known and whose one sheets are maybe less iconic yet no less interesting. The 70s was a great period in American movie poster design. The illustrative style of classic Hollywood was out and instead a new reliance on photographs and, especially, type. The one thing that strikes me about the posters below is how heavily they rely on explanatory text and taglines (“Watch the landlord get his”...“Their story is written on his arm”...“If you steal $100,000 from the mob, it’s not robbery. It’s suicide”...“The tush scene alone is worth the price of admission”). The only two posters here that feature »

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George Segal Recalls Best Kisser From Rom-Com Heyday

14 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Call it what you will: hype, puffery, marketing, buzz.

Nearing 83, actor George Segal has been around long enough to understand how this game is played. So when he was offered the chance to get a star on the Walk of Fame on Feb. 14, Segal figured, “Why not?”

“This is good publicity for ‘The Goldbergs’,” he says. “It’s all ballyhoo. I respect the ballyhoo.”

Now in its fourth season, “The Goldbergs,” Adam F. Goldberg’s ode to growing up in 1980s Philadelphia, has provided a continued platform for Segal, whose career is in its seventh decade. What is the secret to his longevity?

“It beats the shit out of me,” Segal says with a laugh. “I’m just so lucky to still be alive.”

The Walk of Fame ceremony is the day after his 83rd birthday. “I’ve always considered myself to be a lucky person. When I’m asked about the ups and downs of my »

- Marshall Fine

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10 Crucial George Segal Roles Beyond ‘The Goldbergs’

14 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

George Segal rode talent and a hot streak to the top of the movie heap from the mid-1960s into the 1980s. If you only know Segal for his popular TV series “Just Shoot Me” and “The Goldbergs,” here are crucial earlier roles to check out.

King Rat (1965), dir. Bryan Forbes:

This was a break-out role for Segal, a prestigious WWII drama with a mostly British cast that included John Mills, Tom Courtenay, James Fox, Patrick O’Neal, and Denholm Elliott. Segal played a charismatically amoral American sharpie, scrambling to maintain his place at the top of the black-market heap in a Japanese prison camp.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), dir. Mike Nichols:

Segal earned his lone Oscar nomination for this role, in Nichols’ adaptation of Edward Albee’s stinging marital drama. He brought brains and vulnerability as a college professor who, with his mousy wife (Sandy Dennis »

- Marshall Fine

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

4 items from 2017


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