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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 79 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The 5 Best Films of Francis Ford Coppola

21 May 2015 2:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor's Note: Indiewire has partnered with the El Rey Network in support of the iTunes release of their original show Director’s Chair. Top directors tackle insightful questions only other directors would think to ask. Find out more here.] Read More: The 5 Best Films of Quentin Tarantino Francis Ford Coppola's 1970s classics still hold a contemporary feel and artistic vitality, four decades later. From the consummate tale of family and power in "The Godfather" to the ever-prescient political thriller "The Conversation," his best works are definitive genre exercises, blending unwavering realism with escalating tension and a potent moral consideration.  Though his directorial stamp is unmistakable, Coppola has under his belt among the most celebrated family, political, crime and war films in the American canon. He has twice won the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director, and is one of only eight filmmakers to win the Cannes Film »

- David Canfield

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The Top Ten Most Stressed-Out Characters in Movie History

19 May 2015 11:08 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Stress kills, goes the old saying, and can cause a host of maladies before it does. Hypertension, heart disease and even Bruxism, otherwise known as grinding of the teeth, can be its unfortunate products. In that spirit, here are ten examples of stress in on-screen, and its most masterful portraits.

1. Jack LemmonSave the Tiger (1973)

Jack Lemmon took home a Best Actor Academy Award for his incendiary turn as Harry Stoner, a once-prosperous businessman who finds his carefully-tailored life crashing down around him. His garment business in downtown La is going bust, his marriage is dead in the water, and the crazy hippies who hitchhike on the Sunset Strip just don’t match his Ww II era sensibilities. When Harry decides to have his business “torched” for the insurance money, he goes on a self-destructive odyssey through early ‘70s La. His word association game with a cute »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Ten Weddings and No Funerals: The Greatest Cinematic Nuptials

18 May 2015 5:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

There are few rituals in life more chaotic, confounding and magical than the wedding. Appropriately, marriages have provided the backdrop for many a story spun through the ages. Whether it’s sending out multitudes of wedding invitations, choosing the right dress, or whether to seat Aunt Mabel next to her second or fifth ex-husband at the reception, weddings both in life and on film are almost always guaranteed to bring forth a surge of emotions. Below are a few of our favorite cinematic nuptials:

1. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s western masterpiece is full of many iconic moments, not the least of which is one of the screen’s greatest knock-down, drag-out fights between Jeffrey Hunter and Ken Curtis for the hand of comely Vera Miles. Martin Scorsese loved this scene so much, he paid homage by having his characters watch it in Mean Streets (1973).

2. Rachel Getting Married »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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DVD Review – A Most Violent Year (2015)

18 May 2015 9:10 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

A Most Violent Year, 2015

Directed by J.C. Chandor.

Starring Oscar Isaac, Jessica Chastain, David Oyelowo, Albert Brooks, Christopher Abbott, Jerry Adler and Matthew Maher.

Synopsis:

An immigrant New York businessman tries to expand his company’s fortunes despite setbacks from rival firms, criminal gangs and an investigation from the District Attorney.

Set in New York City in 1981, A Most Violent Year is a crime drama that harks back to the works of Coppola, Scorcese and Friedkin, telling a story about a man, his family and his values, all set against a backdrop of corruption and violence that threatens to usurp him at every turn. Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis) plays Abel Morales, a Hispanic immigrant who has built up a successful oil business but is having trouble with his trucks being hijacked and his employees being attacked. Despite his wife Anna (Jessica Chastain – Mama) having mob connections through her father »

- Gary Collinson

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Round-Up: The Shining 35th Anniversary Screening, Dark Was The Night, Poltergeist

15 May 2015 7:58 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Next week marks the 35th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, and it will be screening during the 16th season of Film on the Rocks on June 9th. Also in this round-up: a Dark Was the Night trailer and listing information for the house from Poltergeist.

The Shining 35th Anniversary Screening: Press Release -- "Denver Film Society and Denver Arts & Venues announced the line-up for the 2015 edition of Film on the Rocks (Fotr). Presented by Pepsi, the 16th season includes nine events throughout the summer. Each film is preceded by a live concert and local comedian, courtesy of Comedy Works.

"Memorial Day weekend is the traditional start to Summer and Film on the Rocks is a Colorado Summer tradition," said Britta Erickson, Festival Director for the Denver Film Society. "We are so excited to kick off the season on the holiday weekend and bring cult-classic and fan-favorite films, great »

- Tamika Jones

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George Lucas: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the 'Star Wars' Guru

14 May 2015 5:30 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

George Lucas didn't just create the "Star Wars" universe. The filmmaker, who turns 71 on May 14, pretty much created the cinematic universe we live in now, the ones whose cornerstones include the Thx sound system at your multiplex, the Pixar movies that have dominated animation for the past 20 years, and the Industrial Light & Magic special-effects house, whose aesthetic has ruled the Hollywood blockbuster for nearly four decades. He's the pioneer of the effects-driven action spectacle and the conversion from celluloid to digital, the two trends that, for better and worse, have defined Hollywood's output for nearly 20 years.

As ubiquitous as Lucas and his creations loom in our cinematic dreamscapes, there's still a lot that most people don't know about him, from how he got his start to the famous folks who mentored him or were mentored by him, from the size of his fortune to what he plans to do now »

- Gary Susman

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James Caan and Keir Gilchrist to headline thriller The Waiting

12 May 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

James Caan (The Godfather), Keir Gilchrist (It Follows) and Logan Miller (Night Moves) have signed on to star in the indie thriller The Waiting.

The film will be directed by Kasra Farahani, who will make his feature directorial debut, having previously worked as a production and art director on the likes of Avatar and Thor.

The Waiting is scripted by Jefferson Richard and Mark Bianculli and is set scheduled to start shooting later this month in Los Angeles..

»

- Scott J. Davis

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Production Starts On James Caan Thriller The Waiting

11 May 2015 1:44 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Star Thrower Entertainment, Ball and Chain Productions and Anonymous Content will partner on The Waiting, a thriller to be directed by Kasra Farahani, starring James Caan (The Godfather, Misery, Elf), Logan Miller (Scouts Vs Zombies, Night Moves, The Stanford Prison Experiment) and Keir Gilchrist (It Follows, It’S Kind Of A Funny Story, “United States of Tara”).

Farahani’s short film Noon was optioned within 24 hours of its release by 20th Century Fox and Chernin Entertainment where it is currently in feature development.

Speaking about their film, Co-founders of Star Thrower Entertainment Tim White and Trevor White said, “Mark and Jeff have crafted an excellent script that seamlessly combines elements of a riveting thriller and fascinating character study. This script, together with Kasra’s elegant vision and our compelling cast, makes The Waiting the type of filmmaker and talent driven project ideal for Star Thrower.”

The Waiting was written by Mark Bianculli and Jeff Richard. »

- Michelle McCue

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James Caan, It Follows’ Gilchrist in Faux-Haunting Thriller, The Waiting

11 May 2015 12:45 PM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Kasra Farahani, whose short film Noon received great acclaim and was quickly optioned for feature development, will direct The Waiting, a thriller starring James Caan (The Godfather, Thief), It Follows’ Kier Gilchrist and Logan Miller (Scouts Vs. Zombies). Star Thrower Entertainment, Ball and Chain Productions and Anonymous Content partner on the production about two high…

The post James Caan, It Follows’ Gilchrist in Faux-Haunting Thriller, The Waiting appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Samuel Zimmerman

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‘Stanford Prison Experiment’s’ Logan Miller, Keir Gilchrist to Star in Thriller ‘The Waiting’

11 May 2015 12:26 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

James Caan (“The Godfather”) and “The Stanford Prison Experiment” actors Logan Miller and Keir Gilchrist are set to star in the indie thriller “The Waiting,” which Kasra Karahani will direct for Star Thrower Entertainment, Ball and Chain Productions and Anonymous Content, the companies jointly announced on Monday. Mysterious events occur in “The Waiting” when two high school filmmakers decide to create the illusion of a haunting on an unsuspecting neighbor. Farahani has an impressive background in production design and art direction for studio blockbusters including “Avatar,” “Star Trek,” “Alice in Wonderland” and “Thor.” Farahani’s short film “Noon” was optioned »

- Jeff Sneider

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Review: 'Mad Men' - 'The Milk and Honey Route': For old times' sake

11 May 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A review of last night's "Mad Men" coming up just as soon as I'm the quick brown fox... "We both know things can't be undone." -Trudy "Says who?" -Pete "Mad Men" has chronicled a period of enormous social change (and taken place in a time of enormous change in television), yet it's often seemed agnostic on whether individual change is possible. Over the course of the series, fashions shifted and opportunities rose for women and minorities, but were the "Mad Men" characters themselves really changing with the times? Peggy has certainly grown, yet we've seen Don and Roger and Joan and others have epiphany after epiphany, only to eventually lean back on their old habits. (And even Peggy hasn't been immune to stagnation in her personal life, even as she's evolved professionally.) If anything, Don's frequent backsliding has been one of the most common complaints I've heard about the series' »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Gotham Season 1 Episode 22 Review – ‘All Happy Families Are Alike’

7 May 2015 1:23 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Martin Carr reviews the season finale of Gotham

Perched on the prow and majestic in torchlight stood a figurehead. Her vessel advanced with all the ceremony of a Viking burial, only to dispatch them moments later, like tattered detritus onto the banks of a murky Gotham morning. Crunching shingle under foot as she moved the woman approached them. Gathered around burning oil drums they said nothing as she stopped for a moment glancing into the flames. Heat began to gently thaw her fingers in the silence. Standing off to one side was a teenager cloaked in leather. She was used to quietly sizing up her opposition and choosing each syllable with care; today was no different. A seasoned professional barely out of training bras, this older woman represented something new perhaps. As early morning sun bled through the smog Fish cast her blue eye upon the young charge. Her face spoke of long-held grudges, »

- Gary Collinson

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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DVD Review: "Zarra's Law" (2014) Starring Tony Sirico

30 April 2015 1:14 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

When The Sopranos ended its run on HBO in June 2007, fans were forced to say goodbye to one of television’s greatest series. It is a difficult thing to bid farewell to characters you have come to know and enjoy watching, and Tony Soprano and his extended family and crew were no exception. Fortunately, most of the people who appeared on the show have gone on to other projects, some in a similar vein and others one hundred and eighty degrees removed from the actions of La Cosa Nostra. Actor Tony Sirico, who portrayed Pauley Walnuts since the series began in 1999, was himself involved in some criminal behavior and did less than two years in jail prior to becoming an actor. While the Internet Movie Database lists his first screen credit as appearing in The Godfather Part II (1974) - his appearance is both unconfirmed and uncredited - »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Watch: Robert De Niro’s Audition for ‘The Godfather’

30 April 2015 11:13 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Watching Robert De Niro’s audition tape for “The Godfather,” it’s hard to remember the guy was an Off-Broadway actor pretty much unknown in Hollywood circles. In just a few moments, he presents a fully lived-in character, bouncing off the unseen reader with equal parts charm and cunning. He clearly belongs in the film’s universe. De Niro is so poised and natural in the role of Sonny Corleone, you almost forget the part eventually went to James Caan. He read for multiple characters in the film; director Francis Ford Coppola eventually decided to hold off and offer him the part of Vito Corleone—the younger version of Marlon Brando’s character—in “The Godfather Part II.” That movie, of course, made De Niro internationally recognizable and the first actor to win an Academy Award for speaking mainly a foreign language. To think it all started with this audition! »

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Why 1974 was the best year in film history

29 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask »

- Daniel Fienberg

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Criterion Collection: The Friends of Eddie Coyle | Blu-Ray Review

28 April 2015 3:15 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Those seeking a groove-tastic immersion in a gritty 1970s crime drama will want to pop Criterion’s new burn of The Friends of Eddie Coyle into the nearest blu-ray player. Directed with a cool efficiency by master storyteller Peter Yates, the film is a tale of small time hoods and the sketchy federal marshals who pursue them. Told under the gray, heavy skies of Boston, it depicts a working class world of tiny clapboard houses and chain link fences, with massive land yacht automobiles cruising its wet, glistening streets. With Dave Grusin’s funky yet foreboding score providing Fender Rhodes twinkles and wah-wah pedal counterpoint, The Friends of Eddie Coyle unfolds as a fine example this decade’s unique sub genre: Disco Noir.

Based on a best selling novel by George V. Higgins, The Friends of Eddie Coyle was chiefly a vehicle for Hollywood legend Robert Mitchum, who at the »

- David Anderson

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Karlovy Vary unveils 50th plans

28 April 2015 7:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mel Gibson to film special trailer for the festival; plans for Lebanese cinema focus and tributes to late Us actor John Cazale and Chris Penn.

The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Kviff) has unveiled plans for its 50th ‘annivarysary’ edition, set to run July 3-11.

The jubilee edition will include a look at recent Lebanese cinema, a retrospective of late Soviet-Ukrainian director Larisa Shepitko’s work and tributes to Us actors John Cazale and Chris Penn.

Actor-director Mel Gibson will also film a special trailer for the festival, set to be shot in Los Angeles in early May. The Lethal Weapon star received the Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema at last year’s Kviff.

Gibson continues a tradition that sees the recipients of this award feature in a short trailer for the following festival. It will be written and directed by Martin Krejčí, who has collaborated with Ivan Zachariáš since the beginning of the »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Karlovy Vary Prepares to Celebrate 50th Anniversary

28 April 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Prague — Building on a “you’re the star” theme, the Karlovy Vary Film Festival’s 50th edition will kick off with a massive street party July 3, serenaded by Czech rockers and forgoing the usual formal do at the spa town’s fabulously ornate Grandhotel Pupp.

“It won’t be a festival like we’ve had before,” said Eva Zaoralova, the fest’s former artistic director, noting the spirit of inclusiveness planned for Karlovy Vary’s fans, which will include open-air screenings and images of festgoers on the event poster unveiled in Prague on Tuesday.

Tributes will honor actors John Cazale (1935-1978), who portrayed the luckless Fredo Corleone in “The Godfather” franchise and also starred in “Dog Day Afternoon” and “The Deer Hunter,” and Chris Penn (1965-2006), who appeared in “Rumble Fish,” “Reservoir Dogs” and “Short Cuts.”

There is also a tribute to Ukrainian auteur filmmaker Larisa Shepitko, whose works “Heat, »

- Will Tizard

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Why Al Pacino Still Thinks Michael Corleone Was His Most Difficult Role

26 April 2015 8:25 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Al Pacino opened up about one of his most career defining roles. The legendary actor confesses that he still considers playing Michael Corleone, in The Godfather, his most difficult role. In a recent interview, celebrated actor Al Pacino, who is promoting his newest project An Experience With Al Pacino, got personal with The Guardian. The Academy Award winning Best Actor touched on a wide range of subjects from family to his career and everything in between, revelations of an actor who has truly lived. Perhaps the most interesting career related revelation, however, was the actor.s comments about playing Michael Corleone, particularly of note, how he almost got fired from the part. He had this to say: Michael Corleone in The Godfather was and still is the most difficult role I.ve played. I didn.t see him as a gangster; I felt his power was his enigmatic quality. Unfortunately »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 79 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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