Frenzy (1972) - News Poster

(1972)

News

Picturehouse exec to join streaming service Mubi (exclusive)

Jon Barrenechea to join Mubi as vp marketing from March 5.

Source: Ionut Dobre

Jon Barrenechea

Jon Barrenechea, formerly deputy director of marketing at Picturehouse Cinemas, will join film art-house streaming service Mubi as vp of marketing on March 5, 2018.

In December 2017, Mubi struck its first multi-year, multi-territory studio deal, with NBCUniversal. The eleven territory deal includes films such as Lust, Caution, Being John Malkovich, Touch of Evil, Videodrome, Mall Rats and Hitchcock titles Vertigo, Rear Window, Rope, Frenzy and Shadow Of A Doubt.

The streaming service recently theatrically released titles such as Berlinale Golden Bear winner On Body & Soul from director Ildikó Enyedi and Silver Bear winner Félicité, both shortlisted for the Oscars Best Foreign Language Film category. It is also teaming up with Drive director Nicolas Winding Refn on a new Mubi ident.

Whilst at Picturehouse, Barrenechea opened Duke’s At Komedia in Brighton, and went on to become project development manager working across the build of new cinemas
See full article at ScreenDaily »

"The Alfred Hitchcock Collection" Blu-ray Set From Universal

  • CinemaRetro
Universal has released a highly impressive Blu-ray set, "The Alfred Hitchcock Collection", on Blu-ray. The set contains fifteen special editions of the Master's top films as well as ten original episodes of "The Alfred Hitchcock Presents" television series. The set is packed with 15 hours of bonus extras and includes an illustrated, 58-page collector's booklet with extremely rare international poster art and film stills. Films included in the set are:

Psycho The Birds Vertigo Rear Window North by Northwest The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version) Marnie Saboteur Shadow of a Doubt Rope The Trouble with Harry Topaz Frenzy  Torn Curtain Family Plot

 

Holiday gifts like this don't get any more impressive (or sinister) for the movie lover in your life.

Click Here To Order From Amazon
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Made in England: Three Classics by Powell and Pressburger

  • MUBI
Mubi is showing Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's The Small Back Room (1949), The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960) in November and December, 2017 in the United States in the series Powell & Pressburger: Together and Apart.The story goes that when they were casting their first flat-out masterpiece together, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger sent a letter to an actress outlining a manifesto of their production company, called "the Archers." At the time, the Archers was freshly incorporated, with Powell and Pressburger sharing all credit for writing, directing, and producing, and their manifesto had five points. Point one was to ensure that they provided their financial backers with "a profit, not a loss," which may raise eyebrows among those who are used to manifestos burning with anti-capitalist fire—but then, in a system like commercial cinema, profitability buys freedom.
See full article at MUBI »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Vault Of Horror (1973)

I’ve always had a great appreciation and fondness for horror anthologies, and I devoured horror comics as a kid; whether it was House of Mystery or Creepy magazine, they never failed to fire my imagination in short, sharp bursts. When the Romero/King collaboration Creepshow (1982) came out, my dream of seeing these kinds of stories translated to film was nothing but revelatory. I soon discovered it was not the first of its ilk, and began a journey through dusty video store shelves looking for its long-lost relatives. One of my first (and favorite) finds was Vault of Horror (1973), a five-fingered punch to my nascent, pubescent, omnibus-loving heart.

Released by Cinerama Releasing stateside in March and produced by Amicus (the fine folks behind its predecessor, Tales from the Crypt), Vault of Horror (aka The Vault of Horror, for the easily confused, I guess) was not as well received by critics as Tales,
See full article at DailyDead »

Alfred Hitchcock: The Six Decades and 54 Movie Posters That Define His Career

Alfred Hitchcock: The Six Decades and 54 Movie Posters That Define His Career
With a career spanning six decades, Alfred Hitchcock remains the most influential filmmaker of all time. And while many of his later films are well known, there are also numerous titles to explore during the earliest part of his career in the 1920s.

Read More: How Alfred Hitchcock, ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and More Influenced Wes Anderson — Watch

While Hitchcock started making a name for himself in the 1930s with films like “The Man Who Knew Too Much” and “The 39 Steps,” he really hit his stride during the 1940s with “Rebecca, “Foreign Correspondent” and “Suspicion.” By the next decade, Hitchcock was creating some of the most iconic films of all time with “Rear Window” and “Vertigo.”

In the 1960s, Hitchcock showed no signs of slowing down, transforming the horror genre with “Psycho” and “The Birds.” Even in one of his final films, “Frenzy,” Hitchcock still showcased his ability to shock audiences.
See full article at Indiewire »

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC

Marlene Dietrich in “Shanghai Express”: mptvimages.com/IMDb

If you’re a fan of actress, camp icon, and anti-fascist Marlene Dietrich or want to learn more about her, you’re in luck. The Metrograph theater in New York City is hosting “Marlene,” a retrospective featuring 19 of Dietrich’s films. The festivities kicked off May 23 and will continue until July 8.

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich was born in Berlin in 1901. Dietrich began her career as a vaudeville performer in Weimar Germany. She moved to Hollywood and eventually became a revered film actress, “bisexual sex symbol, willful camp icon, [and] paragon of feminine glamour” — “comfortable in top hat and tails, ballgown, or gorilla suit.” But the actress did not forget about what was happening back home in Germany; Dietrich became involved in the fight against fascism during WWII. She “used her likeness to fundraise for Jewish refugees escaping Nazi Germany and performed on Uso tours, earning her the Metal of Freedom and Légion d’honneur by the French government,” the press release details. Dietrich died in 1992 at the age of 90.

The “Marlene” retrospective will feature Dietrich’s seven films with director Josef von Sternberg: “The Blue Angel,” “Morocco,” “Blonde Venus,” “Dishonored,” “Shanghai Express,” “The Devil Is A Woman,” and “The Scarlet Empress.” The actress’ collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock (“Stage Fright”), Orson Welles (“Touch of Evil”), and Billy Wilder (“A Foreign Affair”) are among the other films screening at the Metrograph. A documentary about Dietrich, Maximilian Schell’s “Marlene,” will also screen. All of the films, besides “Marlene,” will be shown in 35mm.

Head over to The Metrograph’s site for showtimes and more information. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of the Metrograph.

Angel

1937 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Melvyn Douglas

While English statesman Herbert Marshall worries over international affairs, his glamorous wife (Dietrich) concerns herself with, well, international affairs, beginning a tryst with a dashing stranger (Melvyn Douglas) who she only allows to know her as “Angel.” Dietrich’s last film on her Paramount contract is a spry, surprising love triangle, one of the least-known of Lubitsch’s essential works from his Midas touch period.

Blonde Venus

1932 / 93min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Cary Grant

A.k.a “The One with the Gorilla Suit,” which Dietrich dons to perform her big number “Hot Voodoo.” It’s all for a good cause: she’s an ex-nightclub chanteuse who’s gone back to work to pay for husband Herbert Marshall’s radium poisoning treatments, though she later allows herself to become the plaything of Cary Grant’s dashing young millionaire, earning only contempt for her sacrifice.

Der Blaue Engel

1930 / 106min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, Kurt Gerron, Rosa Valetti

Mild-mannered, uptight schoolteacher Emil Jannings lives a faultlessly law-abiding, by-the-book existence, but it’s all over when he gets a glimpse of Dietrich’s nightclub chanteuse Lola-Lola, and is immediately ready to ruin himself for her amusement. The first collaboration between Dietrich and von Sternberg made her an international star, and linked her forever to her seductive, world-weary delivery of the song “Falling in Love Again.” We’re showing the German-language version, preceded by a four-minute-long Dietrich screen test.

Desire

1936 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Frank Borzage

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, John Halliday, William Frawley

Dietrich and Gary Cooper reunite in this delightful urbane comedy by Borzage, a master of romantic delirium, here working somewhat after the style of producer Ernst Lubitsch. La Dietrich’s stylish jewel thief stashes a clutch of pearls in the pocket of an upstanding American businessman, and while trying to get back the goods she can’t help but notice the big lug isn’t half bad-looking. An excuse to recall the following lines from the 1936 Times review: “Lubitsch, the Gay Emancipator, has freed Dietrich from von Sternberg’s artistic bondage.” Those were the days.

Destry Rides Again

1939 / 94min / 35mm

Director: George Marshall

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer, Charles Winninger

Jimmy Stewart, still in his rangy, impossibly-good-looking phase, is a marshal who sets out to clean up the wide-open town of Bottleneck without firing a shot in this charming Western musical comedy. The local roughnecks present him one kind of challenge; Dietrich’s saloon singer Frenchy, belting out her rowdy standard “The Boys in the Back Room,” quite another.

The Devil Is A Woman

1935 / 80min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Lionel Atwill, Edward Everett Horton

Dietrich and von Sternberg’s final collaboration, and an apotheosis of sorts. In Spain in the early years of the 20th century, Lionel Atwill’s loyal suitor Pasqualito and the revolutionary Cesar Romero are teased into a frenzy by legendary coquette Concha (Guess who?). The coolly scrolling camera and baroque compositions are courtesy of an uncredited Lucien Ballard and Von Sternberg himself, doing double duty as cinematographer.

Dishonored

1931 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen

Dietrich plays X-27, a Mata Hari-esque spy for the Austrian Secret Service tasked with using a bevy of costume changes (Russian peasant, feathered helmet, leather jumpsuit) to gather information on the Russians during World War I. Outrageous plotting, high chiaroscuro style, and the star’s earthy sensuality mark this unforgettable pre-code treasure, beloved by Godard and Fassbinder both. Says Victor McLaglen: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

A Foreign Affair

1948 / 116min / 35mm

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jean Arthur, John Lund, Millard Mitchell

Against the backdrop of a ruined postwar Berlin, another conflict is just heating up, as Dietrich’s cabaret singer with rumored Nazi ties vies with Jean Arthur’s Iowa congresswoman-on-a-fact-finding-mission for the affection of American officer John Lund. Wilder’s penultimate collaboration with co-writer Charles Brackett is a black comic delight full of crackling, piquant dialogue, and Dietrich’s knowing slow-burn has never been better.

Judgment At Nuremberg

1961 / 186min / 35mm

Director: Stanley Kramer

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, William Shatner

Dietrich’s last truly substantial screen appearance came as part of the ensemble for Kramer’s courtroom drama, playing the widow of a German general executed by the Allies who’s befriended by investigating judge Spencer Tracy in this fictionalized retelling of the events of a 1947 military tribunal addressing war crimes by civilians under the Third Reich. Rounding out the all-star cast are Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, William Shatner, and Maximilian Schell, who would win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and later directed a portrait of Dietrich.

The Lady Is Willing

1942 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Mitchell Leisen

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Fred MacMurray, Aline MacMahon, Stanley Ridges

Leisen, considered a comic talent on-par with Lubitsch during the screwball era, lends characteristic sparkle to this mid-career attempt at reconfiguring Dietrich’s very 1930s star persona to fit the needs of the 1940s women’s picture; here she plays a glamor-gal diva whose life changes when she discovers a baby on Eighth Avenue and decides to adopt, passing through melodramatic coincidences and a vale of tears before falling into the arms of Fred MacMurray.

Lola

1981 / 113min / 35mm

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Armin Mueller-stahl, Mario Adorf, Matthias Fuchs

Dietrich had for all purposes retired from the screen by the time that Fassbinder began his frontal assault on West German popular culture, but her image and her unlikely combination of cool irony and torrid emotion left a profound mark on his films. Lola, the candy-colored, late-1950s-set capstone of his “Brd Trilogy” in particular draws heavily from The Blue Angel, with bordello singer Barbara Sukowa torn between Mario Adorf’s sugar daddy and Armin Mueller-Stahl’s incoming building commissioner in boomtown Coburg.

Marlene

1984 / 94min / Digital

Director: Maximilian Schell

More than twenty years after Schell had co-starred with Dietrich in Judgment at Nuremberg, during which period she’d retired to a life of very private seclusion, he tried to get her to participate in a documentary about her life. She finally gave in — sort of. Dietrich offered only her memories and her famous voice, refusing to appear on camera, but necessity became a boon to the resulting film, a sort of guided tour of Dietrich’s life and work, which simultaneously reveals much and deepens her mystery.

Morocco

1930 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou

After The Blue Angel, shot in Germany, was a hit, von Sternberg was given full run of the Paramount backlot, where he would conjure up all manner of exotic destinations out of thin air. First stop: North Africa, where French legionnaire Gary Cooper competes with sugar daddy Adolphe Menjou for the favors of Dietrich’s cabaret star Amy Jolly, who in one scene famously rocks a men’s tailcoat and plants a smooch on a female fan.

Rancho Notorious

1952 / 89min / 35mm

Director: Fritz Lang

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Arthur Kennedy, Mel Ferrer, William Frawley

Teutons Lang and Dietrich team up in a Technicolor wild west of deliberate, garish artifice in this singularly claustrophobic oater, in which a revenge-mad Burt Kennedy goes looking for his fiancée’s killers at a hideaway inn run by Dietrich, and discovers dangerous, unbidden desires instead. As the chant of the film’s recurring, persecutorial Brechtian ballad goes: “Hate, murder, and revenge.”

The Scarlet Empress

1934 / 104min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe, Louise Dresser

Have ever a screen persona and a historical personage found such a hand-in-glove-fit as did Dietrich and Empress Catherine the Great of Russia? While the Motion Picture Production Code was preparing to chasten American movies, Dietrich and von Sternberg got together to throw one last lavish S & M orgy, a flamboyant film of 18th century palace intrigues and ludicrously lapidary décor.

Shanghai Express

1932 / 82min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong

“It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” proclaims Marlene Dietrich with the disdain of an empress, though in fact she’s a high-class courtesan, re-encountering former lover Clive Brook on an express train rolling through civil war-wracked China. The fourth of Dietrich and von Sternberg’s collaborations is a riot of delirious chinoiserie artifice and sculpted shadowplay — Dietrich’s co-star Anna May Wong was never again shot so caressingly.

The Song Of Songs

1933 / 90min / 35mm

Director: Rouben Mamoulian

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill

So often the instrument of corruption, Mamoulian’s film allows Dietrich to be the corrupted one, playing a country girl, Lily, who comes to big-city Berlin and quickly becomes the model and muse of sculptor Brian Aherne. Lionel Atwill’s preening decadent Baron von Merzbach admires Lily’s nude form in marble, and decides to bring the original home with him, where she slips into the role of the cynical sophisticate, though her heart remains with the artist.

Stage Fright

1950 / 110min / 35mm

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jane Wyman, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim

Hitchcock’s last film in his native England until 1972’s Frenzy is an audaciously-structured thriller, making use of an extended flashback and a whiplash narrative about-face. Acting student Jane Wyman tries to save beau Robert Todd from taking the fall for a murder committed by stage star Dietrich, who shows her hypnotic charm in a show-stopper performance of “I’m the Laziest Gal in Town.”

Touch Of Evil

1958 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Orson Welles

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles

It’s not the size of the part, but what you do with it. Playing a brothel keeper in a seedy border town in Welles’s magnificently baroque late noir, Dietrich only has a clutch of lines, but they’re the ones you remember, whether her famous requiem for crooked cop Hank Quinlan, or her reading of his “fortune”: “Your future’s all used up.” Bold and self-evidently brilliant, you could use Touch of Evil to explain the concept of great cinema to a visiting Martian.

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cannes at 70: The Five Key Years That Changed the Festival Forever

Cannes at 70: The Five Key Years That Changed the Festival Forever
Every Cannes Film Festival is important, but only a handful of the editions have been game-changers. As the festival celebrates its 70th birthday, here are five events that altered the DNA of Cannes, shaping the fest into the global powerhouse that it is today.

The First Festival, 1946

French minister for education and fine arts Jean Zay wanted an international event for France to rival the Venice Film Festival, which had begun in 1932. Several French cities wanted to host; Cannes was selected over Biarritz because it had better hotels. Variety reported in June 1939 that a Cannes festival was planned for September, under the presidency of Louis Lumiere; however, WWII put a freeze on any European festivities.

Cannes finally debuted in September 1946. Variety arranged for coverage, including a special report from Margaret Herrick, the executive secretary of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. Herrick marveled at the speed of travel: It
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Otd: Annie, John Cameron Mitchell, and Field of Dreams

On this day (April 21st) in history as it relates to showbiz...

Anthony Quinn

1904 Oscar winning cinematographer Daniel L Fapp (West Side Story and Desire Under the Elms, among many films) born in Kansas City

1914 Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor born in England. Though he was BAFTA nominated Oscar never bit despite high profile films and collaborations with famous directors. Credits include: RepulsionThe Omen, Dr Strangelove, Star Wars, Frenzy, Dracula (1979) and MacBeth 

1915 Oscar's all time favorite Mexican actor Anthony Quinn born (Lust for Life, Viva Zapata, Wild is the Wind, Zorba the Greek, La Strada, etcetera)

1918 "The Red Baron," the famous German fighter pilot, shot down in World War I. Snoopy in Peanuts fantasizes about him repeatedly and he's also been a character in many films including Wings, Hell's Angels, and Darling Lili 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Great Job, Internet!: An old Hitchcock interview reveals why he found humor in horror

Fans of the legendary Alfred Hitchcock know that the acclaimed suspense director was known for his sense of humor and for poking fun at himself. His introductions to his 1950s to 1960s CBS and NBC series Alfred Hitchcock Presents, for example, were full of macabre in-jokes, as was this promo for one of his later efforts, 1972’s Frenzy:

His eloquence and wit also made Hitchcock a valuable interview. The PBS Digital Studios series Blank On Blank recovers interview footage from notables like Frank Lloyd Wright, Jacques Cousteau, and Stephen King and pairs the dialogue with delightful accompanying animation. This latest installment from the Pacifica Radio Archives has Hitchcock chatting with Cullen Edwards in 1957 about his death-obsessed reputation, saying, “If I did a story about Cinderella, they would be waiting for the body to turn up.” He also comments on why he finds graveyards humorous and why making movies ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Actor Alec McCowen Dead At Age 91; "Frenzy" And "Never Say Never Again" Among His Screen Credits

  • CinemaRetro
Alec McCowan (right) with Vivien Merchant and Jon Finch in Alfred Hitchcock's "Frenzy".

Alec McCowen, acclaimed British actor of stage and screen, has passed away at age 91. Theater was McCowan's first love and his one-man adaptation of the New Testament formed the basis for his critically-praised show, "St. Mark's Gospel". He would receive three Tony nominations throughout his career. He was classically trained as an actor and appeared in many high profile stage productions around the world. McCowen made occasional appearances in high profile films. His best-remembered role was as the London detective in Alfred Hitchcock's 1972 classic "Frenzy". In the part, McCowen had to track down a serial rapist and murderer who is terrorizing the city. He played the role with wry humor especially in scenes in which his doting wife, played by Vivien Merchant, insists on cooking him elaborately prepared dinners of barely edible food. McCowen also
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Walk Through Alfred Hitchcock’s Career With Documentary, Masterclass, Video Essay & More

One of the most iconic and revered filmmakers in cinema history, Alfred Hitchcock’s importance to the medium has led to a lengthy amount of material on the man and both his public and private life, with no end of books, articles, films and documentaries. Today we now have a few more materials to gain a better insight into his directing process.

First up we have a 55-minute documentary from 2003 titled Living Famously, which paints a three-dimensional portrait of the man who’s understanding and grasp of human fear allowed for him to make some of the best suspense thrillers, murder mysteries and horror films of the twentieth century. Before walking through his career, the film introduces how this legendary figure of filmmaking got his start: “The movies provided excitement and escape for an overweight loner with a boring clerical job,” to put it bluntly.

Featuring a range of interviewees,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Watch: 1-Hour Roundtable With Samuel L. Jackson, Will Smith, Benicio Del Toro, Michael Caine & More

With just over a month until the Oscar campaigning finally concludes, there’s still a few more items of note. Today brings THR’s annual actors roundtable, in which Will Smith (Concussion), Mark Ruffalo (Spotlight), Benicio Del Toro (Sicario), Joel Edgerton (Black Mass, The Gift), Samuel L. Jackson (The Hateful Eight), and Michael Caine (Youth) all gather. During the one-hour conversation, they discuss getting into the business, their biggest fears and disappointments, who has taught them the most, their advice for young actors, and much more.

In one of the most interesting sections, after Caine talks turning down Alfred Hitchcock‘s Frenzy, Smith talks about turning down Django Unchained, saying, “[Quentin Tarantino and I] talked, we met, we sat for hours and hours about it. I wanted to make that movie so badly, but I felt the only way was, it had to be a love story, not a vengeance story. I don’t
See full article at The Film Stage »

Julie Harris, Costume Designer for Bond and Beatles Movies, Dies at 94

Julie Harris, Costume Designer for Bond and Beatles Movies, Dies at 94
Oscar-winning costume designer Julie Harris, who helped define the swinging looks of the 1960s and ’70s London, died May 30 in London. She designed for James Bond films “Casino Royale” and “Live and Let Die” as well as the Beatles’ “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Help.” She was 94 and had suffered a chest infection.

Harris (no relation to the late actress Julie Harris) won an Academy Award for her mod designs in the 1967 Julie Christie-Dirk Bogarde film “Darling.” Over a four-decade career, she also served as costume designer on “Goodbye Mr. Chips,” “Rollerball,” the 1979 “Dracula” with Laurence Olivier and “The Great Muppet Caper.”

After working on the two Beatles films, she said, “I must be one of the few people who can claim they have seen John, Paul, George and Ringo naked.”

The glamorous looks for 1968’s “Casino Royale” and 1973’s “Live and Let Die” helped define the James Bond style,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Bond voice actor Robert Rietti dies, aged 92

Voice actor Robert Rietti has died, aged 92.

Rietti was known for lending his voice to James Bond villains when filmmakers wanted to re-record lines.

According to The Times, Rietti died on April 3.

Among the villains he dubbed were Emilio Largo (Adolfo Celi) in 1965's Thunderball and Ernst Stavro Blofeld (John Hollis) in 1981's For Your Eyes Only.

"In nearly every Bond picture, there's been a foreign villain, and in almost every case, they've used my voice," Rietti once said.

Throughout his career, he also voiced characters in The Guns of Navarone (1961), Lawrence of Arabia (1962), The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), Doctor Zhivago (1965), Barbarella (1968), Frenzy (1972), Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and Trail of the Pink Panther (1982).
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Watch: Vintage, 18-Minute Talk With Alfred Hitchcock From 1969

Step back in time 46 years with us to 1969. Alfred Hitchcock, fresh off “Topaz,” was entering the very tail end of his career. He had two more films in his future — “Frenzy" and "Family Plot” — but his best work was well behind him. Nevertheless, he was (and still is) a legendary director, one of the best of the best to have graced cinema, and his mind was as much (if not more) a treasure trove of movie history, information, and advice than ever. One afternoon those many years ago, Hitch sat down with actor-writer-director Bryan Forbes (“The Stepford Wives,” screenplay for “Chaplin”) in the National Film Theatre in London to discuss movies and answer questions from an audience of cinephiles. Fortunately, for those of us too young or otherwise unable to have attended, Eyes on Cinema has uploaded an 18-minute recording of interview. Forbes kicked off the interview — after a quick
See full article at The Playlist »

Billie Whitelaw, Esteemed Actress Of Stage And Screen, Dead At 82

  • CinemaRetro
Billie Whitelaw, the acclaimed British actress who won praise for her roles on stage as well as on screen, has died in a nursing home at age 82. Whitelaw began appearing in British films in the 1960s and gradually became one of the nation's most reliable and respected actresses. Her film titles include "Carve Her Name With Pride", "Charlie Bubbles", "The Krays", "Gumshoe", Hitchcock's "Frenzy", "Start the Revolution Without Me", "The Dark Crystal" and her final big screen venture, the 2007 hit cult comedy "Hot Fuzz". She is best known to American audiences as Mrs. Baylock, the creepy housemaid from the 1976 version of "The Omen" who has a knock-down brawl to the death with Gregory Peck. Whitelaw, who was also a popular presence through frequent appearances in television series, attributed her rise to stardom to her close association with avant garde playwright Samuel Beckett, with whom she collaborated on numerous acclaimed stage productions.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Billie Whitelaw Of ‘The Omen’ & ‘The Krays’, Beckett Muse Is Dead At 82

  • Deadline
Billie Whitelaw Of ‘The Omen’ & ‘The Krays’, Beckett Muse Is Dead At 82
Update Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. with more information, below:

Stage, screen and radio actress Billie Whitelaw was perhaps best known to international audiences for her role as Mrs. Baylock in 1976 horror film The Omen, but she had a versatile career at home in the UK where she was a muse to Samuel Beckett and won BAFTAs for her film and television work. Whitelaw died on Sunday at a London nursing home, her son told the BBC. She was 82. Among her many big-screen credits, which stretch back to 1953, are 1967’s Charlie Bubbles with Albert Finney; 1968’s The Twisted Nerve with Hayley Mills; Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972’s Frenzy; The Omen; 1988’s The Dressmaker with Joan Plowright and Pete Postlethwaite; Peter Medak’s classic biopic The Krays in 1990; and more recently, Edgar Wright’s 2007 Hot Fuzz with Simon Pegg.

Whitelaw was born in 1932 and made her radio acting debut at age 11, per the BBC.
See full article at Deadline »

R.I.P. Billie Whitelaw (1932 – 2014)

Acclaimed British actress Billie Whitelaw has passed away yesterday aged 82, it has abeen announced. Whitelaw was best known for her role as Mrs. Blaylock in the horror classic The Omen, as well as her regular collaborations with playwright Samuel Beckett.

Born in Coventry in 1932, Whitelaw trained at Rada before making her stage debut in 1950, and first appeared on the big screen four years later in The Sleeping Tiger. She would enjoy regular movie appearances throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including a BAFTA Award-winning supporting turn in 1967’s Charlie Bubbles, and Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972 thriller Frenzy.

Beginning in 1963, Whitelaw gained acclaim for her work in the plays of Samuel Beckett, who penned many of his works specifically for the actress. She would also add a BAFTA TV Award in 1972’s The Sextet, before receiving international recognition with 1976’s The Omen., where she played the sinister nanny Mrs. Blaylock.

In later years,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites