Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie
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The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) More at IMDbPro »Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie (original title)


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

10 items from 2017


Canon Of Film: ‘Playtime’

12 September 2017 1:26 AM, PDT | Age of the Nerd | See recent Age of the Nerd news »

In the second edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look a Jacques Tati‘s ‘Playtime’. For the genesis of Canon Of Film, you can click here.

Playtime” (1967)

Director: Jacques Tati

Screenplay: Jacques Lagrange and Jacques Tati; with addition English dialogue by Art Buchwald

Jacques Tati’s ‘Playtime‘ is clearly a masterpiece, but I think almost nobody can actually master it. According to film scholar Noel Berch, ‘Playtime‘, doesn’t have to just be seen multiple times, but has to be seen from several different points in the theater itself. The movie is all action. Not the way we normally think of action, but “action” in terms of filling up the screen. To watch one thing – usually in the foreground – means you’re missing many things happening in the background, and vice-versa.

The most expensive French film made at the time, the film’s box office failure would eventually bankrupt Tati. »

- David Baruffi

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The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

22 August 2017 5:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese, »

- Jordan Raup

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Meaning and Madness: Close-Up on Luis Buñuel's "Viridiana" and "The Exterminating Angel"

16 June 2017 12:22 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Luis Buñuel's Viridiana (1961) is showing June 17 - July 17 and The Exterminating Angel (1962) is showing June 18 - July 18, 2017 in the United Kingdom.ViridianaIt’s impossible to avoid describing the films of Spanish director Luis Buñuel as “surreal,” and yet to do so is woefully insufficient. This is for two reasons. In the first place, Buñuel never made one kind of film. In the second place, even his strangest films deal with social reality.Early in his career Buñuel did associate himself with the Surrealist art movement. Among his first productions were the infamous Un chien Andalou (1929) and L'âge d'or (1930), experimental narratives co-written by Salvador Dali in which bizarre and violent psychosexual incidents connect via absurd dream logic. It’s worth bearing in mind that the Surrealists never meant “surreal” to act as a mere label for the uniquely strange. »

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Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

23 May 2017 2:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by »

- Anne Thompson

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Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

23 May 2017 2:37 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Lover for a Day’

20 May 2017 1:28 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Defiantly independent French director Philippe Garrel continues to question how to love, be loved and overcome the inevitable disappointment when betrayal occurs in “Lover for a Day,” an alluring and very elegantly crafted — though largely predictable — romantic dramedy that should do well in territories where the French auteur is already known and esteemed.

The film opens with a young brunette sitting on the sidewalk at night, sobbing her heart out, so upset she can’t breathe. Judging by the big luggage she’s carrying, it’s likely that her lover has just thrown her out of the apartment. In the next scene, we hear a young woman’s sighing — only this time, it’s a gasp of pleasure, not of pain, as she enjoys illicit sex with an older lover in a university bathroom.

The sight of women crying is nothing new in Garrel’s films; in fact, most of them do, »

- Pamela Pianezza

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An Overview of Spanish Independent Cinema in 3 Films

18 May 2017 5:21 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

We are excited to partner this year with L.A. Ola, a showcase of the best contemporary independent cinema from Spain, to show several of their films on Mubi in May and June, 2017. Agata's FriendsFor the third consecutive year, the L..A. Ola showcase strives to bring the best of Spain’s current independent cinema to Los Angeles for a short but concise program. This year, the festival will take place in various L.A venues from May 18 - 21 and will later travel to the East Coast with four of the program’s feature films for a special New York edition, which will show from June 2 - 4 at Anthology Film Archives. Although some of the films showcased are already well into their international festival lifespan, some of the films might have their U.S. premier at L.A. Ola. But for us here in the U.S., L.A. Ola »

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7 Filmmakers Deeply Influenced by Luis Buñuel

24 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel died in 1983, but his films continue to inspire many filmmakers today, including Woody Allen and David O. Russell. New York’s Metrograph theater is presenting a series of the surrealist filmmaker’s work from March 30 to April 6 entitled “Buñuel in France” that will feature five of his films. Buñuel directed 35 movies between 1929 and 1977.

Read More: Watch: Was Luis Buñuel a Fetishist? A Video Essay

Here are seven filmmakers who have listed a Buñuel film in their top 10 movies of all time.

Woody Allen

Allen’s favorite Buñuel film is 1972’s “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie,” the famous comedy about six middle-class people attempting to have a meal together. Allen wore his inspiration on his shirt sleeve in his 2011 fantasty-comedy “Midnight in Paris,” casting the actor Adrien De Van to play Buñuel in a scene also featuring the surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (Adrien Brody) and visual »

- Graham Winfrey

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Berlinale: Watch the First Clip From Sally Potter’s ‘The Party’ (Exclusive)

2 February 2017 12:33 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Variety has been given exclusive access to the first clip from Sally Potter’s “The Party,” starring Patricia Clarkson, Timothy Spall and Kristin Scott Thomas. The film, which she describes as “a comedy, albeit wrapped around some tragic elements,” world premieres in competition at the Berlin Film Festival.

The story centers on a gathering at the London townhouse of a married couple, Bill (Spall), an academic, and Janet (Scott Thomas), a politician, who has just been promoted to the top tier of her party. “[Bill] has given up some opportunities in his working life in order to support hers,” Potter explains. “And with that decision come some disappointments, some frustrations.”

With five other guests (and one significant absentee), the set-up recalls such classics as Mike Nichols’ adaptation of Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and Luis Bunuel’s “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie.” “Each of these people hold secrets. »

- Leo Barraclough

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How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

4 January 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it »

- Carson Blackwelder

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

10 items from 2017


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