IMDb > Asylum (1972/I)
Asylum
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Asylum (1972/I) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.5/10   2,843 votes »
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Down 3% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Robert Bloch (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Asylum on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 November 1972 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
See what the author of "Psycho" is up to now! See more »
Plot:
A young psychiatrist interviews four inmates in a mental asylum to satisfy a requirement for employment... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
2 wins See more »
User Reviews:
Entertaining British horror anthology. See more (57 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Barbara Parkins ... Bonnie (segment: "Frozen Fear")

Richard Todd ... Walter (segment: "Frozen Fear")

Sylvia Syms ... Ruth (segment: "Frozen Fear")

Peter Cushing ... Smith (segment: "The Weird Tailor")
Barry Morse ... Bruno (segment: "The Weird Tailor")
Ann Firbank ... Anna (segment: "The Weird Tailor")
John Franklyn-Robbins ... Stebbins (segment: "The Weird Tailor")

Britt Ekland ... Lucy (segment: "Lucy Comes to Stay")

Charlotte Rampling ... Barbara (segment: "Lucy Comes to Stay")
James Villiers ... George (segment: "Lucy Comes to Stay")
Megs Jenkins ... Miss Higgins (segment: "Lucy Comes to Stay")

Herbert Lom ... Byron (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")
Patrick Magee ... Dr. Rutherford (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")
Geoffrey Bayldon ... Max (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")

Robert Powell ... Dr. Martin (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")
Sylvia Marriott ... Asylum Head Nurse (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")

Daniel Johns ... Otto the Dummy (segment: "The Weird Tailor") (as Daniel Jones)
Frank Forsyth ... Asylum Gatekeeper (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")
Tony Wall ... New Houseman (segment: "Mannikins of Horror")

Directed by
Roy Ward Baker 
 
Writing credits
Robert Bloch (written by)

Produced by
Gustave M. Berne .... executive producer (as Gustave Berne)
Max Rosenberg .... producer (as Max J. Rosenberg)
Milton Subotsky .... producer
 
Original Music by
Douglas Gamley 
 
Cinematography by
Denys N. Coop (director of photography) (as Denys Coop)
 
Film Editing by
Peter Tanner 
 
Casting by
Ronnie Curtis 
 
Art Direction by
Tony Curtis 
 
Makeup Department
Roy Ashton .... chief make-up
Joan Carpenter .... chief hairdresser
 
Production Management
Teresa Bolland .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Anthony Waye .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Fred Carter .... set dresser
 
Sound Department
Norman Bolland .... sound mixer
Bob Jones .... dubbing mixer (as Robert Jones)
Clive Smith .... sound editor
Mike Tucker .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Ernie Sullivan .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Neil Binney .... camera operator
Bob Jordan .... focus puller (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Bridget Sellers .... wardrobe mistress
 
Music Department
Douglas Gamley .... music arranger
 
Other crew
Pamela Davies .... continuity
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
  • G.S.E.  titles (as G.S.E. Ltd)

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"House of Crazies" - USA (reissue title)
See more »
Runtime:
88 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Herbert Lom shot his cameo in half a day, he was booked for a day.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the first story, when the parts of the dismembered corpse are moving around, two right hands appear, one crawling on the floor and the second reaching down for Bonnie's face.See more »
Quotes:
[Byron shows Dr. Martin the dolls he's been making]
Byron:These are not ordinary figures. The eyes were made to see. Inside each skull is a perfectly proportioned brain, perfectly capable of functioning.
Dr. Martin:You talk about them as if they were alive.
Byron:Hm. That's the final step.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Stephen King's World of Horror (1986) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
Pictures at an ExhibitionSee more »

FAQ

Are these based on short stories?
See more »
34 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
Entertaining British horror anthology., 2 February 2004
Author: Snake-666 from England

Roy Ward Baker directs this horror anthology from the pen of macabre master Robert Bloch. Dr. Martin (Robert Powell) is a psychiatrist who wishes to work at an asylum for the incurably insane. In order to gain employment he is set a task by the house chieftain Dr. Rutherford (Patrick Magee) whereby he must discover the identity of a former doctor-turned-patient. Dr. Martin speaks to four different patients in an attempt to discover who used to be the psychiatrist and each patient relates to him their own particular terrifying story.

Robert Bloch, the man responsible for writing the novel of one of horror’s greatest movies, ‘Psycho’ (1960), writes for us four intriguing and pleasurable short horror pieces bound together wonderfully in the confines of an asylum. The film (produced by Amicus studios and now available in the UK in a wonderful box set) has a distinct feeling of a Hammer Horror production to it. The emphasis is on the story and artistic merit rather than cheap shocks and Roy Ward Baker does an excellent job throughout the production of building tension so that each shock has a desirable effect on the viewer. Each segment benefits from a marvellous cast which features the undeniable talents of the legendary Peter Cushing in ‘The Weird Taylor’ and the beautiful Britt Ekland in ‘Lucy Comes to Stay’. Britt Ekland would go on to co-star as the seductive landlord’s daughter Willow in the classic British horror ‘The Wicker Man’ just one year later.

The various segments themselves vary in quality, although not too dramatically. The opening segment, ‘Frozen Fear’ is a deliciously campy story about a man whose murdered wife seeks revenge on him and his lover. This particular segment may be a little too silly for some horror fans but it works as a perfect mood setter for the rest of the movie. The directorial style is what makes this segment worth watching. There are some wonderfully flowing shots which seek to give the short segment a distinctly unsettling edge despite the short falls of the script and story. A wonderful performance from Barbara Parkins of ‘Valley of the Dolls’ (1967) fame in the role of Bonnie caps the segment exquisitely and the climatic scene back in the asylum following the story give the segment an overall horrific nature.

This segment is followed by ‘The Weird Taylor’ which stars Peter Cushing as a devastated father who turns to the occult to resurrect his deceased son. He enlists the help of Bruno (Barry Morse), a taylor desperately in need of money, to make for him a suit to specific instructions. This segment is possibly the weakest of the four yet remains enthralling as the viewer cannot help but wonder just where this particular story is headed. Once again Roy Ward Baker’s direction during this segment is powerful as he creates a dark and despairing atmosphere despite the limitations of time and the story. Cushing’s performance is certainly memorable as is Barry Morse’s. The climax of the story is well portrayed but is unfortunately harmed by an air of unnecessary camp. Still, ‘The Weird Taylor’ is entertaining nonetheless but may be off-putting due to its overly slow nature.

Up next is ‘Lucy Comes to Stay’ which tells the story of a young girl (Charlotte Rampling as Barbara) who apparently has been recently released from a mental institution for her schizophrenia. She is still haunted by her imaginary friend Lucy (Britt Ekland) who soon makes an appearance and convinces her to leave the safety of her brother’s house. Murder and mayhem follow and the despairing Barbara reaches breaking point pretty quickly. This particular segment works more on the basis of the storyline rather than direction as there is little in the way of atmospheric build-up. Britt’s on-screen presence is commanding and powerful and her portrayal of a horror villain is so good that one wishes this segment had been made into an entire feature length movie as opposed to the short segment that it is. The shock scenes are blended into the story seamlessly with a superb accompanying soundtrack. This is my favourite of all the segments.

The film finally finishes with ‘Manikins of Horror’ where a former doctor believes that he can make and control little dolls. This segment takes place wholly back in the asylum and unlike the previous three stories there are no flashbacks to past events. This segment is possibly the most original of the stories and could even be possible influence for ‘Child’s Play’ (1988). Unfortunately, the story falls short as it becomes hard for one to suspend their disbelief yet the segment works as an excellent precursor to the genuinely surprising and shocking ending. Undeniably camp yet strangely intriguing this is a fitting ending to a generally entertaining horror film. For those who like horror anthologies and Hammer-style productions, one cannot go too far wrong with this entertaining British horror film. The film fails to maintain quality from start to finish but does not fail to entertain, surprise or shock. To sum up - an entertaining piece of horror anthology fare with some excellent direction, beautifully atmospheric scenarios and accompanying music and a strong cast who all give credible performances. My rating for ‘Asylum’ (1972) – 7/10.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Asylum (1972)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Needed a touch more blood edwstraker
Amazing dmhead777
Rate each segment michael_myers_II
I know most of the music was Mussorgsky but... mjr3090
Bruno's accent Keep_Searching
Cheesy. Necatoriasis
See more »

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