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Alla ricerca del piacere
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Amuck (1972) More at IMDbPro »Alla ricerca del piacere (original title)


3 items from 2011


Rest in Peace: Farley Granger

29 March 2011 3:15 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The world lost another film legend today with the passing of Farley Granger at the age of 85. Granger, who died of natural causes at his Manhattan home, was best known for his roles in two Alfred Hitchcock films, but he also appeared in several Italian horror movies in the early 1970's.

Hitchcock cast the American actor first in Rope in 1948, following that up with Strangers on a Train in 1951. Granger played the part of tennis star Guy Haines at the mercy of a psychotic socialite (Robert Walker) who is convinced he had struck a murder deal with the athlete. In addition to the Italian genre films Something Is Crawling in the Dark; Amuck; So Sweet, So Dead; and The Coed Murders, he portrayed the sheriff in Joseph Zito's The Prowler.

Per Yahoo! along with his roles in dozens of films through the 1970s, Granger also entertained a significant acting career on and off Broadway, »

- Uncle Creepy

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Hitchcock star Farley Granger Dead at 85

29 March 2011 6:11 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Best known for  lead roles in two of Alfred Hitchcock’s most famous films, Strangers On A Train (1951) and Rope (1948), Mr. Granger had a long career that included starring roles in several Film Noirs including the classic They Live By Night (1948). Mr. Granger spent time in Europe where he starred in Lucio Visconti’s Senso (1954 – which screened at this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival). Granger appeared in the sleazy Giallos So Sweet So Dead (1972 – Aka: The Slasher Is A Sex Maniac) and Amuck (1972) and, back in the states, the 80′s slasher standard The Prowler (1980). Farley Granger was 85.

From The Hollywood Reporter:

Farley Granger, who played the likable tennis pro who was thrust into a murder exchange in Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train in 1951, died Sunday of natural causes in New York. He was 85.

Two years earlier in 1948, Granger had won acclaim for another Hitchcock murder thriller, »

- Tom Stockman

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Farley Granger: Resented Gay Label But "Lived the Greater Part of My Life with a Man"

28 March 2011 8:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Alida Valli, Farley Granger in Luchino Visconti's Senso Farley Granger Dies: Rope, Senso, Strangers On A Train A lengthy big-screen hiatus followed, as Farley Granger's on-camera appearances became restricted to television work. He eventually returned to features in the late '60s, almost invariably in European productions. During that time, he was featured in several Euro-Westerns and horror/gialli (mix of violence and sex) productions. Among the Westerns were My Name Is Trinity (1970) and The Man Called Noon (1973); Granger's gialli and horror flicks included Something Is Crawling in the Dark (1971), Amuck (1972), The Red Headed Corpse (1972), and So Sweet, So Dead (1972). According to the IMDb, Granger's last feature-film role was in P. J. Posner's dramatic comedy The Next Big Thing in 2001. In addition to his film and TV work, Granger also appeared on Broadway in The Glass Menagerie, The Seagull, The Crucible, and Deathtrap. In 1966, he won [...] »

- Andre Soares

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3 items from 2011


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