5.4/10
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5 user 1 critic

The Alf Garnett Saga (1972)

Based on the BBC television series, and a sequel to 'Till Death Us Do Part (1968)', it tells of the family relationship between Alf Garnett, his wife, daughter and son-in-law, all living in a council flat.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Dandy Nichols ...
Adrienne Posta ...
Paul Angelis ...
...
Mr. Frewin
Patsy Byrne ...
Mrs. Frewin
...
Wally
John Bird ...
Willis
...
Milkman
Joan Sims ...
...
Himself
George Best ...
Himself
Max Bygraves ...
Himself
...
Herself
Kenny Lynch ...
Himself
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Storyline

Based on the BBC television series, and a sequel to 'Till Death Us Do Part (1968)', it tells of the family relationship between Alf Garnett, his wife, daughter and son-in-law, all living in a council flat.

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Genres:

Comedy

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Release Date:

August 1972 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

The Garnett Saga  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Adrienne Posta replaced Una Stubbs. Paul Angelis replaced Anthony Booth. See more »

Goofs

In the opening scene Alf's shaving cut tissue paper moves position from the side of his mouth to under it. See more »

Quotes

Passenger: This is a non-smoking compartment, Sir.
Alf Garnett: I can read, can't I?
Passenger: There are smoking compartments you know?
Alf Garnett: And for your information, Mr Clever Dick, they're all bloody-well full, aren't they?
Passenger: Smoking is a filthy, disgusting and dangerous habit.
Alf Garnett: Dangerous? Dangerous? For your information, the money what come out of the tobacco tax last year was enough to pay for your National Health Service. It's the only thing that keeps the country solvent, innit? Dangerous! Cor blimey, if your country's involved ...
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Connections

Spun-off from Till Death Us Do Part (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Drumdramatics, Nos. 6 - 7
(uncredited)
Music by Robert Farnon
Chappell Recorded Music Library
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User Reviews

 
good memories
19 August 2013 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

i was 9 when this film was made and lived in john walsh tower at the time of filming, i still remember the day when they filmed the scene when they walked down the stairs outside the tower block, i had to go to school my brother was ill and watched from the stairs behind them (top left in scene). we moved into that tower block in 1965 and moved out in 1983 life in there in the 60's and 70's was great but if you were old it was a nightmare constant blackouts meant no lifts and a walk up the stairs, by the 80's things were changing and now that tower block is a gang haven a very dangerous place to be. apart from the opening title scenes and the walk down the stairs outside the block none of the other scenes were filmed there, the flat were Alf lived and all other interior scenes were filmed elsewhere, having watched the film now it is complete rubbish and the racist language in the film is prehistoric, it doesn't really depict life in an east end tower block in that period because most of the scenes were filmed in an out of London area, but it did bring back memories of life as a kid, we had to move into the tower block because we had no toilet in our post war dump of a terraced house my parents were glad to get in there, apart from sentimental value and west ham and George best this film is better avoided.


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