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Loophole (1981)

It sounds like a winner — Albert Finney and Martin Sheen team up for a daring subterranean bank robbery in the heart of London. The locations, the sets and the production are all first class. So what happened? Susannah York and Jonathan Pryce are in on the heist as well.

Loophole (1981)

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1981 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date January 3, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Albert Finney, Martin Sheen, Susannah York, Colin Blakely, Jonathan Pryce, Robert Morley, Alfred Lynch, Tony Doyle, Christopher Guard, Gwyneth Powell.

Cinematography Michael Reed

Film Editor Ralph Sheldon

Original Music Lalo Schifrin

Written by Jonathan Hales from a novel by Robert Pollock

Produced by Julian Holloway, David Korda

Directed by John Quested

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The great movie titled Loophole is still the underdog film noir from 1954, with Barry Sullivan as a bank clerk being dogged by an insurance investigator. The 1981 Loophole, an English movie,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Anniversary Classics Western Weekend, L.A. August 12-14

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

This weekend of August 12 through 14th, the Laemmle Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a series of classic western films that will also feature special guests who are scheduled to come and speak about their work in the films. We strongly suggest checking with the theatre’s schedule to see which other guests are added.

From the press release:

Anniversary Classics Western Weekend

August 12-14 at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Beverly Hills

5 Classic Westerns with special guests throughout the weekend

Laemmle’s Anniversary Classics presents our tribute to the sagebrush genre with the Anniversary Classics Western Weekend, a five film round-up ​of some of the most celebrated westerns in movie history. The star-studded lineup features John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan, Kevin Costner, Montgomery Clift, Natalie Wood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef and others.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

At 87, Walk of Fame Honoree Ennio Morricone Lives Up to His Legend

At 87, Walk of Fame Honoree Ennio Morricone Lives Up to His Legend
The career of Italian composer Ennio Morricone, who on Feb. 26 will receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, has few — if any — parallels in the history of film music.

The composer for “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “The Mission,” “The Untouchables,” “Cinema Paradiso” and an estimated 375 other feature films (not to mention another 90 or so TV projects) is perhaps the most prolific in Western cinema.

He is also among the most respected. Filmmakers from Terrence Malick to John Boorman, Mike Nichols to Barry Levinson, Roman Polanski to Bernardo Bertolucci, Roland Joffe to Brian De Palma, have sought him out to contribute to their films.

Reached at his home in Rome, he says via interpreter, that receiving the star is “a great accolade,” adding, “I can only anticipate how I’m going to feel when I’m there in L.A.”

It’s just the latest honor for the 87-year-old maestro.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense
See full article at Moviefone »

From Actor to "Action!", Exploring the Debuts of 19 Actors-Turned-Directors

Over the course of film history, we've seen plenty of long-time actors step behind the camera to take up their directorial ambitions. Clint Eastwood did it. Mel Gibson did it. George Clooney did it. What do these three have in commonc Well, for starters, they are all men, so there's that. Further, they are all white, but more on that later. More to the point of the article, these men all eased into their directorial careers by starring in their respective debuts, using their presence on screen to help market their talents off it. And with his feature directorial effort The Water Diviner, which hits limited theaters this week, Russell Crowe is just the most recent addition to a growing list of actors who have decided to try their hand behind the camera. Like Eastwood, Gibson, and Clooney before him, the Best Actor winner stars in his first feature as director,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

TCM to Honor Quincy Jones with Night-Long Tribute Marathon

TCM to Honor Quincy Jones with Night-Long Tribute Marathon
Quincy Jones, the one-of-a-kind music legend with a record 79 Grammy nominations (and 27 wins), is due to be honored this month by Turner Classic Movies in an all-night tribute to the composer and producer. On Monday, June 30, 81-year-old Jones and TCM personality Robert Osborne will host an evening of films that showcase Jones's scores. Starting with Sidney Lumet's 1965 "The Pawnbroker"--Jones's very first job as a film composer--the evening will also feature the Sidney Poitier/Anne-Bancroft starrer "The Slender Thread," best picture winner "In the Heat of the Night," the original "Italian Job" and "$ (Dollars)." From 8 p.m. Eastern to 4:15 a.m. the next morning, fans of Quincy Jones will be treated to an entire evening of the composer's music. Over the course of his career, Jones composed 33 major motion picture scores, as well as the theme music for TV shows like "The Bill Cosby Show" and "Ironside."  During the 1960s,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Supporting Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated (part 1 of 5)

With the Academy Awards for the 2011 film year in the rear-view mirror, it’s time to take a look at one of the event’s most consistently fascinating categories: Best Supporting Actor. The most interesting story in the category this year isn’t who got nominated, it’s who didn’t. More specifically, Albert Brooks was completely robbed of a nomination for his performance as film producer turned lethal gangster Bernie Rose in Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive.

As much as I’d like to say I was surprised by this, considering both the quality of performance and Brooks’ slew of nominations from other critical circles, in light of the Academy’s history of overlooking outstanding supporting performances, I simply can’t.

Following is a chronological look at a number of performances richly deserving of a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award nomination.

In some cases, the performances are in films
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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