The Waltons (1971–1981)

TV Series  -   -  Drama | Family | Romance
7.6
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.6/10 from 3,040 users  
Reviews: 34 user | 17 critic

The life and trials of a 1930s mountain family.

0Check in
0Share...

Watch Now

on Amazon Instant Video

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 33 titles
created 07 Oct 2011
 
a list of 43 titles
created 11 Jun 2012
 
list image
a list of 35 titles
created 06 Sep 2012
 
a list of 39 titles
created 15 Jan 2013
 
a list of 37 titles
created 04 May 2013
 

Related Items

Search for "The Waltons" on Amazon.com

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Waltons (1971–1981)

The Waltons (1971–1981) on IMDb 7.6/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Waltons.

User Polls

Episodes

Seasons


Years



9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1981   1980   1979   1978   … See all »
Won 3 Golden Globes. Another 17 wins & 57 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Fourth Waltons reunion TV movie is now set in the 1960s which has John-Boy still living in New York, trying to persuade his fiancée to marry him. Meanwhile, Ben and Cindy's daughter, ... See full summary »

Director: Harry Harris
Stars: Richard Thomas, Ralph Waite, Michael Learned
Drama | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Third Waltons reunion movie has most of the family split up on the days approaching Thanksgiving, c. 1946. But most of the family begins to arrive at Walton's Mountain begging with John-Boy... See full summary »

Director: Harry Harris
Stars: Ralph Waite, Jon Walmsley, Judy Norton
Drama | Family | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

The life and adventures of the Ingalls family in the 19th century American West.

Stars: Melissa Gilbert, Michael Landon, Lindsay Greenbush
Eight Is Enough (1977–1981)
Comedy | Drama | Family
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

This comedy drama focused on a family with eight very independent children.

Stars: Dick Van Patten, Lani O'Grady, Susan Richardson
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Jason Walton (213 episodes, 1971-1981)
...
 Erin Walton (213 episodes, 1971-1981)
Eric Scott ...
 Ben Walton (213 episodes, 1971-1981)
...
 Mary Ellen Walton (212 episodes, 1971-1981)
David W. Harper ...
 Jim-Bob Walton (212 episodes, 1971-1981)
...
 Elizabeth Walton (212 episodes, 1971-1981)
Earl Hamner Jr. ...
 Narrator / ... (211 episodes, 1972-1981)
...
 John Walton, Sr. / ... (196 episodes, 1972-1981)
...
 Ike Godsey (172 episodes, 1972-1981)
...
 Olivia Walton (169 episodes, 1972-1979)
...
 The Grandfather / ... (145 episodes, 1972-1979)
...
 Esther Walton (144 episodes, 1971-1980)
...
 John-Boy Walton (124 episodes, 1971-1978)
Ronnie Claire Edwards ...
 Corabeth Walton / ... (107 episodes, 1975-1981)
Edit

Storyline

In the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, during the Great Depression, the Walton family makes its small income from its saw mill on Walton's Mountain. The story is told through the eyes of John Boy, who wants to be a novelist, goes to college, and eventually fulfills his dream. The saga follows the family through depression and war, and through growing up, school, courtship, marriage, employment, birth, aging, illness and death. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Family | Romance

Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 September 1972 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Spencer's Mountain  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(221 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Mary Ellen's husband, Dr. Curtis Williard, was written out of the show by having him killed during the attack on Pearl Harbor. However, a couple of seasons later it was discovered that Curtis was among the few that survived the attack and was still alive and living in another city, but was rendered impotent due to the injuries he suffered during the attack. See more »

Goofs

The gender of the dog Reckless seemed to change back in forth throughout the first several episodes. See more »

Quotes

Grandpa (Zeb) Walton: Jim Bob, just where do you think you're going?
Jim Bob Walton: I'm leaving, Grandpa.
Grandpa (Zeb) Walton: May your favorite Grandpa ask why?
Jim Bob: Elizabeth's never going to walk again... it's my fault.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #18.40 (2010) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Best TV Show in the 1970s
8 July 2011 | by (Chicago, IL) – See all my reviews

I watched this show while it was on television in the 1970s. Because I lived in a very urban and hectic setting, it was my solace. I would escape to this show as a psychological refuge - it really was that valuable. I didn't realize it at the time, but this show gave me a kind of hope for humanity that I've not seen on television since. The decay of the American family over the years has demonstrated that even more over time.

I used to look forward to each and every episode, fascinated by John-Boy and his writing. I always loved school and books, and found his writing exploits to be therapeutic and life-changing. It was at this time that I started writing journals. I had the good fortune to run into Richard Thomas in Hollywood after I'd read a book of his poetry. He had become a father to triplets and was very gracious when I mentioned I'd read his book. He was driving a station wagon filled with Pampers while picking up some orange juice at a market near where I lived.

Seeing this family interact among each other was a stark contrast to my own. My mother worked outside the home evenings, and it was my job to co-parent the children that she had with my step-father. As he was the antithesis of Ralph Waite's character, I believe this is part of the reason why this series had such a profound effect upon me. This is ironic, given that my step-father was old enough to be my mother's father. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that perhaps children in challenging familial situations could benefit greatly from viewing this show. Unlike the frothy Brady Bunch, this show presents how the core of a real and loving family could ideally operate.

For sure, the Depression Era setting would make most any modern child grateful for what he or she has today. Just about every earthly family situation is represented, from daily life at that time to careers, courtships, marriages, births, aging, illnesses and deaths.

The integrity of the parents and how they work together as a team is paramount to how this family survives. They also embrace the wisdom of their parents, who reside with them. Each child is nourished in a way that allows each of them to become whom they wish to be. This is the one aspect that mirrors my life, as my own mother was progressive in her thoughts about personal freedom.

The family dynamic between the grandparents is really entertaining and sweet. The program's multi-generational nature accentuates what is usually a bland and forced storyline in family dramas.

The other characters are charming, too, from the store keeper, Ike Godsey, his rather snooty wife, Corabeth, to the elderly Baldwin sisters and their racy "family recipe" (moonshine whiskey) which they inherited from their father. While the women in the Walton household are opposed to alcohol, Grandpa would sneak out to visit the Baldwins for a little refreshment. Other wandering characters in the show could include people as diverse as gypsies and circus acrobats, which always shown a sharp contrast to this family-centric show.

The core of this show is definitely the interactions among the family, whose simple structure and financial struggles during the Depression to live a decent life during the Great Depression. The communication and warmth are human qualities that many families today lack and viewing this show could benefit them as an example of what a truly caring family team looks like. Despite the fact that the story took place so long ago, the familial aspects of the show are timeless.


8 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Favorite Character Who Was Not a Walton janet-conant
Olivia's Italian Family madison_70
1930s- 40's setting- 70's hairstyles Flywiththeowl
Erin in 'The Return' shannongr
This show used to scare me senseless when I was little cmfalf
Miss ctfan79
Discuss The Waltons (1971) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?