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2017 Tribeca Film Festival Preview

  • HeyUGuys
Author: James Kleinmann

The Tribeca Film Festival hits New York next week and runs from April 19 – 30 th. Now in its sixteenth year, the annual event was co-founded by screen legend Robert De Niro in the wake of the September 11th attacks in an effort to revitalise Lower Manhattan. Retaining an element of its original commitment to Us indie cinema, it has evolved to encompass TV, Vr, online work, music and gaming. As ever, the festival will welcome a dizzying array of big name guests including Tom Hanks, Emma Watson, Jon Favreau, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Quentin Tarantino, Scarlett Johansson and Ron Howard. Here are just some of the highlights, for the full line up and to buy tickets check out the official festival website here.

Opening and Closing night Galas at Radio City Music Hall

Kicking off the festival is the world premiere of music doc Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Tributes pour in for Robert Vaughn

  • ScreenDaily
Tributes pour in for Robert Vaughn
Stars from the entertainment world have paid tribute to the TV and film actor who died on Friday from leukaemia. He was 83.

Vaughn was best known for playing the spy Napoleon Solo in the 1960s TV spy series The Man From Uncle. His co-star David McCallum, who played Illya Kuryakin in the series, told TVLine.com that he was “devastated”.

“Robert and I worked together for many years and losing him is like losing a part of me,” said McCallum. “My deepest sympathies go out to Linda and the Vaughn family.”

Director Edgar Wright was one of many from the entertainment world to take to Twitter.

“Rip Napoleon Solo!” he wrote. “The great Robert Vaughn was the coolest guy on TV when I was a kid. Superb in Bullitt, The Magnificent Seven & many more.”

Former 007 actor Roger Moore said, “Sorry to hear the news about Robert Vaughn.”

Actor, writer and comedian Stephen Fry had this to say:
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Robert Vaughn dies, aged 83

Tony Sokol Nov 12, 2016

Robert Vaughn, who played the suave spy Napoleon Solo on The Man from U.N.C.L.E., had died.

Sad news. Robert Vaughn died this morning, November 11, of acute leukemia at the age of 83, the veteran actor’s manager Matthew Sullivan announced through Variety. Vaughn died in New York “surrounded by his family,” Sullivan said.

Robert Vaughn is best known in his signature role as Napoleon Solo on The Man From U.N.C.L.E., but he is also the proud gunfighter who painfully scratches his nose against the slate wall in his last battle in The Magnificent Seven.

David McCallum, who played Vaughn’s Russian spy partner on The Man From Uncle, told TVLine.com he was "utterly devastated. … Robert and I worked together for many years and losing him is like losing a part of me. My deepest sympathies go out to Linda and the Vaughn family."

Vaughn was born in New York City.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Actor Robert Vaughn Dead At Age 83; Oscar Nominee And Star Of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E."

  • CinemaRetro
This Article Has Been Updated

By Lee Pfeiffer

The past year has been an especially harsh one for the entertainment industry in terms of well-known personalities who have passed away. Today's news that actor Robert Vaughn has died hits Cinema Retro especially hard and this writer in particular. He died from a battle with leukemia and was surrounded by his family in his final moments. I first met Robert in 1983 at a press conference in New York in which he and David McCallum promoted their forthcoming TV movie "Return of The Man From U.N.C.L.E." I've remained friends with them ever since and shared many an enjoyable conversation. Robert was an early supporter of Cinema Retro and contributed to numerous issues, most recently issues #33 and #34 in which he was interviewed by writer Steve Rubin about the dramatic occurrences in making the 1969 WWII film "The Bridge at Remagen
See full article at CinemaRetro »

R.I.P. Robert Vaughn (1932 – 2016)

American actor Robert Vaughn – best known for his role as Napoleon Solo in The Man from U.N.C.L.E. – has passed away aged 83 following a battle with leukemia.

Born in New York City, Vaughn made his acting debut in 1955 with a guest role in Medic, the first of over two hundred TV roles, which included the hit 60s spy series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., 1970s detective series The Protectors, and the 80s classic The A-Team. In more recent years, he appeared in the British drama Hustle, along with the soap opera Coronation Street.

In addition to his TV work, Vaughn also appeared in a number of notable feature films, including an Academy Award-nominated turn in The Young Philadelphians, as well as The Magnificent Seven, Bullitt, The Towering Inferno, S.O.B. and Superman III.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum. Vaughn
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The shows & films that made Britain fall in love with anime

From Marine Boy and Thundercats to Cities Of Gold and Akira, we look at the TV shows and movies that introduced the UK to Japanese anime

One evening in 1994, the BBC screened a documentary simply called Manga. Presented by Jonathan Ross, it showcased the rising popularity of Japanese animation, largely focusing on the output of Manga Entertainment, whose dubbed VHS releases had made a huge impact on anime fans and caused a certain amount of consternation among the mainstream press.

For British viewers, the anime boom took a long time to arrive. In America, Japanese shows like Kimba The White Lion, Gigantor and Astro Boy were a common sight on television in the 1960s, yet it took until the late 70s and 80s, and a string of European-Japanese co-productions, before anime finally began to find a hold on UK television.

As a youngster at the time, I didn't necessarily know
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brian Clemens: an appreciation of The Avengers and The Professionals writer

We pay tribute to Brian Clemens, a screenwriter and producer whose work lit up 1970s cult TV and beyond...

Brian Clemens, who died earlier this week aged 83, was a highly respected screenwriter and producer both for TV and Film. He will chiefly be remembered for his work on The Avengers, The New Avengers and The Professionals but his credits were numerous and encapsulated a real golden age of cult, escapist television from the 1950s onwards.

Clemens was born in Croydon in July 1931. He spent his National Service as a Weapons Training Instructor. After spending time as a copywriter, he established himself as a scriptwriter - sometimes using the pseudonym "Tony O'Grady" - O'Grady being his mother's maiden name. He received his first commission from the BBC at the age of 24 - a thriller called Valid For Single Journey Only. He went on to write for many of the big TV
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brian Clemens, Writer/Producer/Director, Dead At Age 83; TV Classics "Danger Man", "The Avengers" And "The Persuaders" Among His Credits

  • CinemaRetro
Screenwriter and producer Brian Clemens has passed away at age 83 in his native England. Clemens wrote scripts for some of the most revered British television programs of the 1960s and 1970s including "Danger Man" (aka "Secret Agent"), "The Avengers", "The Persuaders", "The Professionals",  "The Baron" and "The New Avengers".  Clemens also produced or executive produced several of the aforementioned shows.  He also contributed single episode scripts for other popular shows including "Highlander", "The Protectors" and "Remington Steele".  Clemens wrote numerous scripts for "Father Dowling Mysteries" and three "Perry Mason" TV movies in the early 1990s. A prolific writer, he also  wrote screenplays for feature films beginning in the 1950s. His credits include "Station Six Sahara", "The Corrupt Ones" (aka "The Peking Medallion"), "See No Evil", "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad", Disney's "The Watcher in the Woods", "Highlander II: The Quickening" and the Hammer horror film "Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Avengers and The Professionals writer Brian Clemens dies, aged 83

TV writer and producer Brian Clemens has died, aged 83.

Clemens was perhaps best known for being responsible for The Avengers, New Avengers and The Professionals.

Honoured by the Queen in 2010 for services to broadcasting and drama, he passed away on Saturday (January 10), his family confirmed.

He also wrote for various TV series, including The Baron, The Persuaders, The Protectors, Danger Man, The Invisible Man and Bergerac.

His production companies created The New Avengers and The Professionals, while he also wrote for several Us shows including Remington Steele, Perry Mason and Highlander.

Clemens also wrote and produced for Hammer Films, while also co-writing the story for Highlander II: The Quickening.

He was also involved in The Elstree Project, whose spokesman said: "Brian gave his support and time to The Elstree Project and is featured in our documentary film, through clips from the oral history interview he gave to us, as well
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Diana Quick: a woman of substance

At the peak of her Brideshead fame, she broke her jaw and lost half her teeth. It might have finished some actors, but not Diana Quick. She talks to Kira Cochrane about agitprop, acting couples – and supporting herself with crochet

There was a moment in the early 1980s when Diana Quick looked bound for one of those Hollywood careers synonymous with swimming pools, paparazzi and giant sunglasses. She had been acting professionally since the late 1960s, landed a major role in Ridley Scott's first feature The Duellists in 1977 and, as the 80s dawned, was working on the British TV adaptation of Brideshead Revisited. Her role as exquisite, troubled aristocrat Lady Julia Flyte made international fame seem assured. When the series aired in 1981, headlines wondered if Quick was the world's most beautiful woman.

But between shooting Brideshead and its TV showing, her life changed dramatically. In San Francisco with her boyfriend of the time,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

London Film Memorabilia Convention Hammer & Horror Film Day- London, 9 November

  • CinemaRetro
Hammer and Horror Film Day!

Saturday November the 9th ( 10am – 5pm )

Central Hall Westminster.

Storey’s Gate, Westminster, London SW1H 9Nh

UK’s longest running film fair and convention.

Now in it’s 40th year!

The Convention presents dealers from all over the UK, Europe, Us ,

Canada and South America.

Specialising in rare original film memorabilia and collectables.

Taking place six times a year these are truly unique events for anyone with an interest in films!

With actors and director’s signings, illustrated talks, retrospectives and film screenings taking place through out the day.

Items covering the history of cinema can be found. From the silents to the present.

From rare items of the 1920’s to new releases and the latest heart throb.

Among the many different field of cinema covered at the show is – Classic Hollywood, horror films, sci-fi, the best of British and European cinema as we as cult tv!
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Gerry Anderson obituary

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Gerry Anderson obituary

Thunderbirds creator who made some of the most popular children's TV shows of the 1960s

Gerry Anderson, who has died aged 83 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was the main mover behind a number of puppet series commissioned by Lew Grade's Independent Television Corporation. They made the company a fortune from the space age: perhaps the best known was Thunderbirds (1965-66), and among the others were Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Stingray (1964) and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68).

Anderson embarked on Thunderbirds in 1964. For Grade, international sales – particularly into the Us market – were a key concern. So Thunderbirds focused on the Tracy brothers, with first names borrowed from the Us astronauts Scott Carpenter, Virgil Grissom, Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Gordon Cooper. Enormously popular in its time, the series is still being repeated today.

Scott and the others were members of International Rescue, based on a south Pacific island, set up,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gerry Anderson, Creator Of "Thunderbirds", Dead At Age 83

  • CinemaRetro
Legendary animation master Gerry Anderson has died at age 83. The creator of such classic TV series as Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlett and Stingray, died in his native England, having battled Alzheimers Disease in recent years. His landmark style of animation, involving puppets as super heroes, never went out of style and crossed over several generations in terms of popularity. He also produced the hit live action TV series Space 1999 and served as executive producer on the cult series UFO in the 1970s. Uncharacteristically, he also produced the 1970s TV spy series The Protectors starring Robert Vaughn. For more on his remarkable life and career click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Gerry Anderson Creator of 'Thunderbirds' dies at 83

Gerry Anderson the creator of the TV series "Thunderbirds which used puppets, and later was adapted for bigscreen, died aged 83 at a nursing home located near Oxfordshire, England. He had suffered from Alzheimers since 2010, reports Variety. Anderson's career started in 1957 and worked on numerous projects on TV including "Terrahawks," "The Protectors," "Space: 1999," "UFO," "Stingray" "Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons." Unfortunately, the film adaptation of the series back in 2004 which was directed by actor Bill Paxton, who starred with Anthony Edwards, Ben Kingsley and Brady Corbet was not well-received. The Universal Pictures release with a production budget of $57 million, earned $6.8 million domestically, and over $21.4 million overseas. He is survived by his three children and second wife Mary.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Gerry Anderson Creator of 'Thunderbirds' dies at 83

Gerry Anderson the creator of the TV series "Thunderbirds which used puppets, and later was adapted for bigscreen, died aged 83 at a nursing home located near Oxfordshire, England. He had suffered from Alzheimers since 2010, reports Variety. Anderson's career started in 1957 and worked on numerous projects on TV including "Terrahawks," "The Protectors," "Space: 1999," "UFO," "Stingray" "Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons." Unfortunately, the film adaptation of the series back in 2004 which was directed by actor Bill Paxton, who starred with Anthony Edwards, Ben Kingsley and Brady Corbet was not well-received. The Universal Pictures release with a production budget of $57 million, earned $6.8 million domestically, and over $21.4 million overseas. He is survived by his three children and second wife Mary.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

'Coronation Street' team excited by Robert Vaughn casting

'Coronation Street' team excited by Robert Vaughn casting
Coronation Street's cast and crew are believed to be thrilled following the news that Hollywood actor Robert Vaughn is joining the soap for a guest stint. Yesterday, it was announced that Vaughn - best known for roles in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Protectors and Hustle - has signed up for the guest part of Milton, a wealthy American man who arrives in Weatherfield after meeting Sylvia Goodwin (Stephanie Cole) on a cruise. In a new statement released today, Coronation Street's producer Phil Collinson commented: "I am delighted to be welcoming The Man From U.N.C.L.E to Coronation Street. Robert was a huge part of my childhood and a magnificent actor. "I am looking forward to seeing the impact this exotic character has on the ladies of Weatherfield." Will Thorp, who is due to bow out on screen (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'Coronation Street' team excited over Robert Vaughn casting

'Coronation Street' team excited over Robert Vaughn casting
Coronation Street's cast and crew are believed to be thrilled following the news that Hollywood actor Robert Vaughn is joining the soap for a guest stint. Yesterday, it was announced that Vaughn - best known for roles in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Protectors and Hustle - has signed up for the guest part of Milton, a wealthy American man who arrives in Weatherfield after meeting Sylvia Goodwin (Stephanie Cole) on a cruise. In a new statement released today, Coronation Street's producer Phil Collinson commented: "I am delighted to be welcoming The Man From U.N.C.L.E to Coronation Street. Robert was a huge part of my childhood and a magnificent actor. "I am looking forward to seeing the impact this exotic character has on the ladies of Weatherfield." Will Thorp, who is due to bow out on screen (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
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