Edit
The Price Is Right (TV Series 1972– ) Poster

(1972– )

Trivia

Terry and Linda Kniess, a Las Vegas TV meteorologist and his wife with respective talents for discerning patterns and mathematics, discovered that the prizes with particular prices on the show tended to repeat often in predictable patterns. Deciding to use this to their advantage, the couple closely watched recordings of the show for months to detect, compute and memorize those patterns. Thus prepared, the couple went to the studio and Terry managed to be picked as a contestant for the taping of the December 16, 2008 game. Sure enough, Terry was able to precisely price the prizes in his games and made it all the way to the Showcase stage where he accurately stated the exact price of his showcase to the dollar, a feat that had only happened once before in the 1970s. At that point, the concerned producers stopped the game convinced that Terry was cheating somehow. However, after a 20 minute pause, no one could say how that was possible and Drew Carey, convinced the game would not be aired, decided to resume the game and coldly announced to Terry that he had won the game with both showcases. As it happened, the game was aired and Carey was excoriated by viewers for his poor manner towards a player who legitimately won according the game's rules. The retired former host, Bob Barker, claimed that he would have played up Terry as the greatest contestant in the game's history to make the most of his spectacular win. In response to Terry's system, the producers retired some prizes and randomized prices in subtle ways to prevent a recurrence.
On January 17, 1992 Danielle Torres from Pepperdine University became the biggest winner in the show's history winning $88,865 in cash and prizes. However, this record was broken on September 18, 2006, the first show of the 35th season, when contestant Vickyann Chrobak-Sadowski made daytime television history in more ways than one. Due to an astonishing double showcase win, she won $147,517 in cash and prizes. As a result, Chrobak-Sadowski not only becomes the biggest winner in the Daytime History of "The Price Is Right" to date, she ALSO sets the record for most money in cash and prizes ever won by a contestant in one appearance on a network daytime game show. The old record was set on 19 May 1984 when unemployed ice cream truck driver Michael Larson appeared as a contestant on Press Your Luck (1983), and won $110,237 in cash and prizes.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On June 8, 1988, while taping an episode, a cameraman swung a camera around and knocked Janice Pennington off stage. There's about a 5 - 6 foot gap between the stage and the floor where the audience sits. Pennington was rushed to Cedars Sinai Hospital, she suffered a concussion and a broken clavicle that required surgery. While she was recuperating, Kyle Aletter temporarily filled in for her. In February 1989, Pennington filed a lawsuit against CBS citing negligence. Pennington's lawsuit went to trial and on March 20, 1992, a jury awarded Pennington $1.3 million for injuries she sustained on the set of The Price Is Right. The accident had damaged her shoulders, leaving a visible scar on one, and as a result she was hindered somewhat from her modeling duties since she was unable to model swimsuits for the rest of her career.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On 17 February 1976, announcer Johnny Olson calls on contestant Patricia Bernard to "Come on down!", however she had gone to the restroom just beforehand. Her husband and a page had to run backstage to tell her she was called to Contestants' Row. Years later, Bob Barker would recall that moment as one of the funniest moments in the show's history.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On October 31, 2006, Bob Barker announced he will step down from his duties and retire following 35 years as The World's Greatest Emcee of "The Price Is Right" and the face of CBS Daytime. On June 15, 2007 Barker hosted his last episode which aired in both the regular daytime spot and again in prime time as a lead in to The 34th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards (2007).
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In 1980, pre-Wheel of Fortune (1983), Vanna White was a contestant on The Price is Right; however, she never got out of Contestants' Row.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After making it's debut on January 3rd 1983, Plinko became the most popular pricing game on the show.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The original models, formally named "Barker's Beauties" were Janice Pennington and Anitra Ford. At the start of the fourth season, when the show went into a one-hour format, Dian Parkinson became the third newest "beauty". Then in early 1977, Anitra Ford was replaced by 24 year-old Holly Halstrom. Janice, Dian, and Holly would show their true beauty success when modeling for new cars, exotic vacation, and nifty prizes. Then, a milestone occurred: On Christmas Eve (December 24, 1990), Kathleen Bradley not only became the fourth new "Barker Beauty", but also the first Black American beauty in both CBS Daytime and "Price Is Right" history. On June 18, 1993, the Season 21 finale, Dian Parkinson left the show "to pursue other interests". Bob allowed her to say goodbye before the 6th pricing game. The producers of "The Price Is Right" launched a nationwide search to replace Parkinson. A 22 year-old college student named Gena Lee Nolin won the coveted job in early 1994. In the spring of 1995 Nolin was spotted on The Price Is Right by a casting director from the hit show Baywatch and Nolin was offered and accepted a regular role on Baywatch. 29 year-old Cindy Margolis filled in for Nolin while the producers searched for a permanent replacement. In 1995, after 19 years on the show, Holly Hallstrom shot her final episode at the end of July. At that point the production company decided to downsize from 4 models to 3 models, two that wear swimsuits (Kathleen Bradley and Gena Lee Nolin) and one that does not (Janice Pennington). Nolin was permanently replaced by 27 year-old model Chantel Dubay. Dubay left the show in 1999, she was replaced by 29 year-old model Nikki Ziering. In 2000 Janice Pennington and Kathleen Bradley were dismissed and try-out models were used until Pennington and Bradley were replaced by two new Barker's Beauties, Claudia Jordan and Heather Kozar. Ziering and Kozar both left the program in 2002. At this time, Jordan became the only "permanent" model and was joined by a rotating cast of additional models. In 2003 Claudia Jardan left the show.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On April 9th 1998, Studio 33 at CBS Television City in Hollywood, where this show is taped was renamed the "Bob Barker Studio" in honor of the program's ceremonial 5000th show and for 'Bob Barker's achievements.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The final three pricing games played on Bob Barker's final show ('Double Prices', 'Grocery Game', and 'Any Number') were the first three games played on his first show, but in reverse order.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Mark Breslow, the show's original director, developed many of the show's innovative camera shots such as opening the light boarder, the whacked out ticket plug shots, and the showcase showdown big wheel arrow shot.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Whenever a contestant spins the Big Wheel and it does not go all the way around (meaning it must pass the number it started on), the audience boos the contestant and they must spin the wheel again, unless it's a bonus spin, then they cannot spin again. On 2 October 2003, Bob Barker himself spun the Big Wheel for a wheelchair-bound contestant, and the wheel did not go all the way around, prompting the audience to boo the host in return. Barker described that moment as the "most humiliating" of his game show hosting career.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On 16 April 2009, two years after his retirement from hosting the show and passing the torch to Drew Carey, Bob Barker made a special guest appearance and returned to the stage during the Showcase Showdown portion of the show, in order to help promote his recent autobiography "Priceless Memories". The prizes of both showcases contained a theme on places where one could read his book.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Holly Hallstrom was another model on the show and her clumsiness and accidental mistakes proved to be popular among the viewers. In September 1995, host Bob Barker dismissed Hallstrom from the show. She later revealed that Barker ordered her off the show because of 14 pounds (6.4 kg) she had gained due to a prescription medication she was taking but she later alleged that the real reason for her dismissal was her refusal to support Barker when Dian Parkinson sued him for sexual harassment. Hallstrom said Barker ordered her to go on talk shows and do interviews saying that Parkinson was lying, as well as being instructed to recall certain events differently from how she remembered them. Hallstrom, who did not want to get involved in the situation or perjure herself, refused and was dismissed from the show. In response to angry mails sent by former fans of the series after Hallstrom's dismissal, Barker sued Hallstrom for libel and slander (Barker v. Hallstrom), claiming that Hallstrom was lying, but dropped the suit 48 hours before the trial began. The court declared Hallstrom the prevailing party and ordered Barker to pay Hallstrom's legal fees.

Hallstrom counter sued Barker for age, weight and medical discrimination, wrongful termination and malicious prosecution (Hallstrom v. Barker). In October 2005, Hallstrom received a multi-million dollar settlement. The settlement would have possibly been more, but early settlement agreements all contained a "hush clause" that forbade Hallstrom from saying anything disparaging about Barker to any form of the media. However, Barker himself refused to agree to the mutuality clause of the settlement agreement, thereby retaining the right to speak freely against Hallstrom in the media. In order to retain her right to speak about the case, and to protect herself against what she called "Bob Barker's shameful manipulation of the media", Hallstrom accepted a lesser financial amount, but with a settlement that did not contain a hush clause. She has also started a foundation for individuals who have suffered wrongful or malicious conditions in the workplace, and don't have the power or resources (financially or otherwise) to go up against powerful individuals (whether it be their boss or CEO, etc.) or large corporations, despite having a valid, non-frivolous claim.

Hallstrom has never married and has no children, which is why she believes she was the one member of The Price Is Right who could stand up to what she called "miserable tyranny at the hands of a mad dictator" (referring to Barker). During nearly 10 years that her lawsuit was in the courts, she spent all of her resources and savings. At her lowest point during those years, she sold her house and ended up living out of her car. As she said in interviews regarding that period of her life, "I refused to give up and let that evil old bastard win." Hallstrom is now semi-retired and living in one of several houses she owns, all of which are in and around San Antonio. She does give occasional interviews for shows such as 'CNN', 'The Today Show' and 'The View'. Hallstrom also appeared several times as a guest panelist on 'Match Game'. In the early 1990s she also appeared on 'Family Feud' with her 'The Price Is Right' co-stars, the majority of which appearances were played against the cast of 'The Young and the Restless'.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On October 12, 1985, with the death of the show's original announcer Johnny Olson due to a cerebral hemorrhage, a complication from a stroke he had suffered several days earlier, the producers started an immediate search for a new announcer. Gene Wood, Rod Roddy, Rich Jeffries, and Bob Hilton all tried out for the announcing position. 48 year old Rod Roddy was selected for the gig as the show's second permanent announcer. Roddy was best known to audiences as the off-screen announcer on the ABC sitcom Soap (1977), who at the time was also announcing Press Your Luck (1983), also taped at CBS Television City, at Studio 41.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On October 27th 2003, announcer Rod Roddy dies of colon and breast cancer. The producers started an immediate and extensive search for a new announcer. Randy West, Daniel Rosen, Burton Richardson, Art Sanders, Roger Rose, Rich Fields, Don Bishop, and Jim Thornton each did about two weeks of shows as an on air audition for the announcing position. To choose a successor, a meeting was called between Bob Barker (Executive Producer), Roger Dobkowitz (Producer), Bart Eskander (Director), Kathy Greco (Associate Producer), and a representative from Fremantle. There were many different opinions (i.e, Barker favored Rich Fields, while Dobkowitz favored Randy West, etc...) and after much discussion it was narrowed down between Fields and Thornton. In a final vote, the decision was made to hire 44 year old Rich Fields for the gig as the show's third regular announcer.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The New Price Is Right premiered at at 10:30 on September 4th, 1972 on CBS. Taped at the CBS studio in Los Angeles, the half-hour program aired Mondays through Fridays and featured several contests and a showcase round.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The show originally premiered as "The New Price is Right" however, the "New" was dropped near the end of the first season on July 2, 1973.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Originally in order to win both showcases, the winning bid had to be less than $100 from the actual price without going over. At the beginning of the show's twenty-seventh season, it was changed to $250 or less away.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The top prize slot in the Plinko game was originally $5,000. It was later changed to $10,000.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the show expanded from a half hour to an hour, the Showcase Showdown was introduced. The three contestants who won their way up on stage during the first half of the show spun a wheel marked with values of 5¢, 10¢, 15¢, etc. through to $1. The objective was the build up a score as close to $1 as possible without going over in one or two spins of the wheel with anything in the second spin being added to the value spun in the first spin. The player who had the score nearest to $1 without going over advanced to the Showcase. As an added bonus, contestants were awarded a $1,000 bonus if they raised $1 in one spin or a combination of two spins in 1975. Later, a bonus spin was added after winning $1,000 for a chance to win an extra $5,000 for landing on either 5¢ or 15¢ spaces adjacent to the $1 space. If they spun $1 in the bonus spin and additional $10,000 was awarded.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The very first pricing game played on the show was "Any Number"; however, all the games were unnamed at this time. This game featured the first car offered and won on the show, which was a 1972 Chevrolet Vega. Its cost was $2,746.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
January 17, 1992: Danielle Torres from Pepperdine University became the biggest winner in the show's history winning $88,865 in cash and prizes.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The call for contestants to "Come on down!", popularized by announcer Johnny Olson was ranked #7 in TV Guide's list of "TV's 20 Top Catchphrases" (21-27 August 2005 issue).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Balance Game (II) was the 100th pricing game to debut on the show. The game made its debut in Season 34.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
There are a number of pricing games where, even if you know the prices of all of the items in advance, there is no guarantee you will win. For example, in "Secret X", even if the contestant gets both prices correct, there is only a 2/3 chance of winning the main prize. (One of the reasons "3 Strikes" was changed to have one "strike" chip instead of three was, when there were three strike chips and five digits in the car price, there was a 5/8 chance of losing even if you knew the price of the car in advance.) On the other hand, there are games such as "Hole in One (or Two)" and "Let 'em Roll" where the contestant can win even without getting any prices correct.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The final episode hosted by 'Bob Barker' was recorded on June 6, 2007, and aired on June 15, 2007.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
June 6, 2007: 'Bob Barker', in an interview with Entertainment Tonight (1981), stated that he would host another season of TPIR if CBS can't find a replacement by the deadline set. The deadline is unknown to the public. On July 23, 2007, on Late Show with David Letterman (1993), Drew Carey announced that he was chosen to fulfill the duties of Bob Barker as host of "The Price Is Right".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
3 November 1975: The Price Is Right expands the series time slot from 30 minutes to a full one hour with the premiere of the Showcase Showdown and the Big Wheel.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
15 October 2007: Drew Carey began his hosting duties on the show's 36th season premiere.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Price Is Right hit another milestone in April 1990, the program became the longest running game show in American TV history, surpassing the primetime hit What's My Line? (1950). To date, this is currently the longest running game show in television history.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On many of the Season 26 summer reruns, the replacement copy for the consolation prize plugs is read by Gene Wood.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On the Season 38 summer reruns shown since July 26th 2010, JD Roberto begins doing the promotional consideration plugs that are edited into the reruns in place of the consolation prize plugs.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Longtime staff member Roger Dobkowitz was fired the show in 2008 after Season 36 wrapped up. Dobkowitz was with the show since the beginning and at 36 years was with the show longer than Bob Barker.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On April 1st, 1981, Bob Barker made his entrance from behind the audience as an April Fools joke. In the late 80's audience entrances became a common occurrence when certain pricing games were played first. Drew Carey has only made one audience entrance.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On October 14 1981, The Price Is Right debut it's 50th game pricing called "Blank Check". In the mid-'70s, Barry & Enright had a game show on the air also called Blank Check (1975) that ran for 26 weeks and was then mostly forgotten. For whatever reason, Barry & Enright decided to file a lawsuit over the use of the name in 1986. Instead of trying to fight the issue, Price Is Right just took the game out of the rotation for a few weeks and then brought it back with its name changed to "Check Game".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In what is probably an unprecedented streak, the first ten shows of Season 29 all have at least one contestant who fails to get the Big Wheel all the way around.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As Bob Barker gained more control over the show's production, he also came to be involved in the selection of the musical cues and themes you hear on the show. Barker was partially involved in salvaging music from the 1994 syndicated version of The Price Is Right and apparently put in a word or two every so often about musical selections.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The original music package to the show was recorded in London. It was composed by Ed Kalehoff for Score Productions.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In the mid 70's, announcer Johnny Olson started appearing on camera once per show to call a contestant to "come on down" starting another tradition. This practice was stopped after Season 30, due to a falling out between announcer Rod Roddy and host & executive producer Bob Barker. Though once in a while, Barker allowed new announcer Rich Fields to make an occasional non-credit roll on camera appearance during the show. The practice was reinstated halfway through Season 37.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Producer Jay Wolpert came up with the idea to make the make the show cases more interesting by writing them as silly skits the creative team referred to as Flaky Flicks. These showcase skits involved the models as well as the announcer. The practice continued through the rest of the Barker era though gradually losing a lot of humor and reducing the announcer's involvement to just announcing. Drew Carey tried to bring these back in his 2nd year hosting, but couldn't quite capture the original humor. Since then the showcases removed humor and focuses mostly on promoting guest stars.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Though the showcase skits had recurring themes, the show never used the exact same showcase skit twice.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
11 September 1989: Make Your Move is played for the very first time.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The 1976 music package featured a music cue called "The Feud". It was mostly used as a car cue, but the very end of the song is used as the intro for a pricing game called "Grand Game". This music gained greater notoriety when it was later used as the main theme song for Family Feud (1976).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
28 August 1973: Lucky $even makes its debut on the show.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
10 March 1998: Line 'em Up is played for the very first time.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
20 September 1999: Let 'em Roll is introduced.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
26 September 1997: It's In The Bag makes its debut on the show.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
9 May 1977: Hole In One is introduced.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
9 April 1973: Hi Lo is played for the very first time.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
28 May 2004: 1/2 Off makes its debut on the show.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
16 May 1980: Grand Game is introduced.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
19 August 1975: Golden Road makes its debut.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
26 September 1972: Five Price Tags is played for the very first time.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
8 January 1976: Danger Price makes its debut.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
7 December 1987: Credit Card is played for the very first time.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Mark Goodson Productions, which produced The Price Is Right, was sold to Pearson Television in 1999. In September 2000, a Pearson executive met with the employees of The Price Is Right and told the employees they are pleased to acquire the show and they love the way it is and will keep everything the same. On October 19, 2000, Pearson executives called another meeting. This time employees were summoned into a room individually, there they met with a male producer and a woman from Human Resources. Sherrell Paris, Sharon Friem, Paul Alter, Linda Riegert, Janice Pennington, and Kathleen Bradley were told their services were no longer needed and dismissed them. Pearson executives offered Pennington and Bradley work on a future special about models, both declined in favor of financial packages. Other employees were laid off in 2001 and Pearson representatives later said the motivation was economic.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After not seeing things eye-to-eye with the Executive Producer, Rich Fields parted ways with the show after 7 years as The Price Is Right Announcer on July 16, 2010, three days before the taping of the show's 39th season began. The producers decided to hold on-air auditions during Season 39 to fill the announcer position with an improv comic in hopes to make the program more of a "variety show within a game show". JD Roberto, Jeff Bryan Davis, Brad Sherwood, David H. Lawrence XVII, George Gray and Steve White all tried out on air for the announcing position. All of the "Guest" announcers are friends and ex co-workers of Drew Carey with the exception of Roberto and Gray who are friends of Mike Richards. Richards officially gave his friend George Gray the permanent announcer gig on April 18, 2011.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
11 September 1972: Clock Game debuts on the show.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In 1972, CBS lured away the Daytime Programming Chief from NBC, Bud Grant. Grant approached Mark Goodson and Bill Todman about reviving their once successful franchise, The Price Is Right. Goodson and Todman wanted to give the show a whole new look. They ordered a colorful set and cast new on camera personnel. The 49 year-old M.C. of Truth or Consequences, Bob Barker, was chosen as the host, 61 year-old Johnny Olson came on board as the announcer, Anitra Ford and Janice Pennington were hired to show off the merchandise. CBS executives liked the retooled version and signed a production deal with Goodson and Todman.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Early on, the show had trouble getting sponsors to put prizes on the show because nobody knew what kind of ratings the show would get.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
For the first week of shows, the producers were nervous about studio reaction. They were afraid people wouldn't be able to hear their names, so the audience was told not to applaud. As time went on the invitation became more appealing by allowing applause and telling the contestants to "Come on down!".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On March 27, 1987, The Price Is Right celebrated a milestone. The program became the longest running game show on daytime network television.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In 1987, 63 year old Barker was named Executive Producer.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dave Price was the first to audition and while Bob Barker and Roger Dobkowitz liked him, Freemantle media intensely disliked him. For the rest of the test hosts, Todd Newton, John O'Hurley, Doug Davidson, Mark Steines, Mario Lopez, Mike Richards, Ian Ziering, and George Hamilton, a mini-test show was held with an audience of folks that decided to stay after a taping of a Bob Barker hosted broadcast show with. Barker and Dobkowitz wanted Marc Summers but, CBS did not want to see him under any circumstances with the only excuse give was that he's "too short". The announcer Rich Fields really wanted to have an audition, but CBS adamantly denied him the opportunity. Mark L. Walberg was among the other candidates being considered and did a runthrough. The producers really liked Walberg wanted him to do a test show. However CBS did not want Walberg because he was "not good looking enough". Rosie O'Donnell was considered to host and had the support of Freemantle, but CBS put an end to it after they received so much hate mail once her name was leaked. After seeing the pilot for Power of 10 (2007), CBS chairman Leslie Moonves really wanted to pursue Drew Carey and even offered him the job of hosting without an audition, but Carey turned them down. On June 29, 2007, Carey received a call from Nina Tassler, CBS' entertainment president, asking him if he got her gift and to discuss the potential hosting deal. Carey figured the gift was an I-Phone since CBS was really coming after him, but when he opened it the box, he saw it was a t-shirt and a mug from The Price Is Right. With the persuasion of his manager and several negotiations, Carey accepted the job while at Late Show with David Letterman (1993) to promote Power of 10.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In July 1984, during hiatus, art director, Jack Hart had decided to change the look of both of the showcase podiums, each of them, separately, had a gold trapezoid shape, surrounded by gold borders and they contain a golden outline of a Goodson asterisk. They also slanted inward and the nameplate holders were also purple and orange, with the word "showcase," written on it, which he thought would be nice to redo on the show, which he did, for the first broadcast that was used on September 14, 1984, which, in fact, was the beginning of the thirteenth season.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dian Parkinson left the show in 1993 claiming her intention to pursue other interests, as host Bob Barker announced during her final appearance. At the time there were rumors, particularly in the tabloids, that she had left the show because of an ongoing feud with Janice Pennington. Although it was reported that they had had a disagreement (production staff seldom paired them together by the early 1990s), it was not the primary reason she departed the show. The following year (1994), Parkinson filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court (case no. BC106366) against Barker for sexual harassment, claiming a three-year sexual relationship was extorted by threats of firing from 'The Price Is Right'. The suit was withdrawn in April 1995 by Parkinson claiming it was too costly and had taken a toll on her health.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Since 1996, six women who were dismissed from 'The Price Is Right' under Barker's role as executive producer have sued Barker for charges including sexual harassment, racial discrimination, and wrongful termination. The women received out-of-court settlements to drop their lawsuits against Barker, except former production assistant Linda Riegert's case, which is still pending.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Bob Barker initially had no interest in hosting the program, since he hosted "The New Truth and Consequences (1950)", another audience participation show, and he didn't want to be typecast as an audience participation game show host only. He wanted to show his versatility and host more of a quiz-based show. Bud Grant convinced him to take the job by saying that "Gambit" and "The Joker's Wild" needed traffic cops, and "The Price is Right" needed a ringmaster.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Gas Money, the 103st pricing game to debut on the show, was the first new pricing game introduced in the post-Barker era. It debuted in Season 37 during Drew Carey's 2nd season as host.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Is to this day, by far the greatest game show ever on CBS.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The very first one bid prize was a fur coat.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On 24 September 2002, after thirty years with basically the same set design and color scheme, a brand-new look was introduced on the show inspired by the primetime specials, including new door designs and a Hollywood-themed mural on the turntable.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Originally the bonus prize for getting a perfect bid in "One Bid" was $100. On November 12, 1998, it was increased to $500.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
22 February 1995: Freeze Frame is introduced.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
25 February 2000: Flip Flop makes its debut.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Mark Goodson and Bill Todman wanted to revive the original version of The Price is Right, but were met with resistance, being told it was too stale and bland for 1970s daytime television. At the same time, they saw how successful Let's Make a Deal (1963) was with Monty Hall and wanted to create their own version of an audience participation show, but couldn't figure out a concept. When CBS bought on Bud Grant to oversee daytime programming, he was interested in reviving game shows, which CBS removed from their daytime lineup in the mid 1960s. He talked to Goodson & Todman about a new version of The Price is Right, one that was more current and fresh. Eventually, they combined the original concept of bidding on merchandise from The Price is Right with concepts from Let's Make a Deal (1963), including pulling contestants from the audience, playing a variety of games on stage, and presenting the prizes with bright lights and loud sound effects. Bud liked the idea and added the new show, along with Gambit and The Joker's Wild, to his new lineup of game shows, which premiered on September 4th, 1972.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Originally Bill Cullen, the host of the original version, was considered as host of the new version of the show. However, his limp from polio and the staging of the new version made this improbable, so other hosts were considered. Mark Goodson and Bill Todman wanted veteran Dennis James to emcee the new version. He hosted an unaired TV pilot that they showed to CBS to demonstrate how the show would work. CBS Daytime VP Bud Grant liked the concept, but wasn't sold on James as host. Grant had been talking to Bob Barker about how he was bringing game shows back to daytime television on CBS and if he would be interested in hosting one of the shows. Barker, who was already hosting Truth or Consequences on daily syndication at the time, said he would be. Grant and Goodson/Todman came to a compromise: Barker would host the daytime version on CBS and James would host the weekly nighttime version on syndication.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
By late 1987, when Barker took over as Executive Producer of the program, he announced he would stop dyeing his hair and let it return to its natural gray color, a move almost unheard of at the time. He was met with resistance by CBS, many of the sponsors on the show, as well as Mark Goodson Productions. However, once they saw that the ratings didn't drop and all the fan mail that approved of his new hair, they stuck behind Barker and allowed him to go ahead with the move.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the producers first instigated the Double Showcase rule, the showcases were in the range of $2000 to $4000, and a $100 difference seemed good, later when the showcases hit between $10000 and $30000, it became too harder for contestants to win a double showcase, hence, it was Roger Dobkowitz's and Phil Wayne's call to increased this range of $250, so they would get at least three or four, a year.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Shortly after obtaining the job, host Drew Carey opted to get laser-eye surgery, Because his glasses had become one of the trademarks of his look, he opted to take the frames out of his old glasses rather than to simply not wear them.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
(23 September 2016) The game "Hot Seat" debuts. The first contestant to play the game won the maximum possible amount, $20,000 in cash.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page