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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

14 items from 2017


Peter Tolan, Norman Lear Developing NBC Comedy With Production Commitment

22 August 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Peter Tolan and Norman Lear are developing a new comedy series with NBC, Variety has learned.

The network has given the new single-camera series, currently titled “Guess Who Died,” a pilot production commitment. Based on Lear’s personal experience of working well into his 90’s, the series is described as a humorous and inspiring look at the shared joys and challenges people experience at any stage of life.

Lear and Tolan will serve as executive producers and writers, with Brent Miller also executive producing. Lear’s Act III Productions and Tolan’s Cloudland Company will produce along with Sony Pictures Television. Cloudland is set up under an overall deal at Sony.

Lear is a television legend, having created, produced, and written classic shows such as “Good Times,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “All in the Family,” and “One Day at a Time.” He has been nominated for 11 Emmy Awards during his storied career, winning »

- Joe Otterson

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Abortion on TV: Three Ways Show Creators Got to Tell Abortion Stories on Their Own Terms

12 May 2017 2:16 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In 2016, three abortion stories told on TV caught the attention of critics. The plots on “Jane the Virgin,” “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and “You’re the Worst” all normalized abortion as a natural part of women’s health. All of these stories, however, occurred pre-Trump.

While the debate over women’s reproductive rights never went away, the topic is back in the spotlight as a new health care bill seeks to treat pregnancies and rape as pre-existing conditions and Texas legislators seek to pass anti-abortion bills. Over on Hulu, “The Handmaid’s Tale” is looking less and less like fiction.

Read More: ‘Jane the Virgin’ to ‘You’re the Worst’: Critics Debate the Normalization of Abortion on TV

Cosmopolitan spoke to 10 show creators and writers about key abortion episodes going as far back as 1972. In the interview, legendary TV producer Norman Lear said, “I can’t imagine an excuse for staying »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Abortion on TV: Three Ways Show Creators Got to Tell Abortion Stories on Their Own Terms

12 May 2017 2:16 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In 2016, three abortion stories told on TV caught the attention of critics. The plots on “Jane the Virgin,” “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and “You’re the Worst” all normalized abortion as a natural part of women’s health. All of these stories, however, occurred pre-Trump.

While the debate over women’s reproductive rights never went away, the topic is back in the spotlight as a new health care bill seeks to treat pregnancies and rape as pre-existing conditions and Texas legislators seek to pass anti-abortion bills. Over on Hulu, “The Handmaid’s Tale” is looking less and less like fiction.

Read More: ‘Jane the Virgin’ to ‘You’re the Worst’: Critics Debate the Normalization of Abortion on TV

Cosmopolitan spoke to 10 show creators and writers about key abortion episodes going as far back as 1972. In the interview, legendary TV producer Norman Lear said, “I can’t imagine an excuse for staying »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Norman Lear To Host Weekly Podcast; Amy Poehler, Julia Louis-Dreyfus Among Guests

24 April 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Norman Lear is lending his voice to the world of podcasts. The veteran writer, producer, director and creator of such landmark sitcoms as All in the Family, Good Times, One Day at a Time, The Jeffersons, Maude and others will be hosting a new weekly podcast on PodcastOne. All of the Above with Norman Lear will cover topics ranging from comedy to family, current events, music, politics and social issues featuring the unique perspectives of celebrities, politicians and… »

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Book Excerpt: “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms”

21 April 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mary Tyler Moore and Susan Silver

The following is excerpted from Susan Silver’s “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms,” which will be released May 2.

(Author’s Note: Iris Rainer Dart, my then writing partner who later went on to write “Beaches,” had gotten pregnant and we had stopped working together. It was 1971. We were managed by comedy legend Garry Marshall and had written one script for “Love, American Style.”)

After Iris and I split up as a writing team, I was starting all over again, trying to “make it on my own” as those famous “Mary Tyler Moore Show” lyrics said. I told Garry that I’d seen her new show and knew I could write it. How did I know? It’s called “chutzpah,” French for “balls.” And I had some, it seems. Actually, she was situated in the Midwest, worked in a small local TV station, and so had I, both those things. It seemed like fate.

Because Garry knew the guys there, they were willing to take his recommendation about me, though I had nothing to show them written alone. I rehearsed over and over in the car as I drove to the studio. I’m sure passersby thought I was a crazy person as I animatedly “delivered my material” checking my expressions in the rear view mirror. I was nervous but determined. I had wanted this so long and now was my big chance.

I pitched three stories to Jim Brooks and Allan Burns, the creators of the show, a little intimidating though nice, and David Davis and Lorenzo Music, the story editors. Lorenzo doubled as the voice of the marvelous droll Carlton the Doorman on “Rhoda,” as well a lot of other voice over work. He and David were in my corner from the beginning, realizing how hard this was for a new writer. They laughed whole heartedly, and I kept eye contact with them as I “performed.” They were so supportive and sweet, and I am forever grateful.

I left the office with the promise of an assignment if they got picked up for a full season. Which, fortunately they did. Surprisingly enough, CBS was not sure about the show and initially stuck it on a Tuesday. Believe it or not, the reviews were not good. Remember the times: It was not common for a woman in the early seventies to not want to be married first and foremost. This character’s fiance had dumped her! To be a career woman with stirrings of feminism, sticking up for one’s self, was not expected in a TV heroine. Here was an actress who had been the beloved wife of Dick Van Dyke! Now she was at work, forming a family with colleagues, and starting friendships with women who were not always that friendly! Radical thinking, particularly about Mary, America’s sweetheart, who every man loved and wanted to protect and every woman wanted to be. This could be dangerous to women viewers and their roles in society.

Fortunately, for me and the show, Fred Silverman, the whip smart exec who came in, moved it to Saturday where it became part of the must-see lineup, later with “Mash,” “Bob Newhart,” “All the In the Family,” and “Carol Burnett.”

That lineup — along with the growing Women’s Movement, which latched on to the show as important — got the Mary Tyler Moore franchise a lot of attention. In comedy as in life, “timing was everything.” I should have been terrified, writing this script alone. But ignorance is bliss.

I always say, “I started on the top and it was downhill after that.” That wasn’t really true, but the Mtm experience was so far superior to any other. Other shows would give you a twenty-minute story meeting and send you home to write. Then sometimes they’d wonder why the script was “not what they had in mind.” At Mtm, once I got my assignment, we had an all day story meeting while we fleshed out the story together. This gave a detailed blueprint from which to begin.

Frankly, if I’d had a struggle to get an assignment, I don’t know if I would have been able to hang, make it at all. I may have been gutsy, but I was not resilient, or so I thought back then.

Susan Silver wrote for some of the most iconic sitcoms of all time, creating laughs for “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Maude,” “Partridge Family,” and more. She was one of the first females in an industry dominated by men. Now she dishes about the highs and lows of her comedy career and life in her memoir, “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms.”

Book Excerpt: “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Peak TV Treasure: One Day at a Time

12 April 2017 12:42 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Are you overwhelmed by how much television is available right now? Is life getting in the way of keeping up with the shows you wanna try out? We feel your tube-related pain. Here’s a handy feature that’ll help you locate the hidden gems in this era of Peak TV.

One Day At A Time

Network | Netflix

Created By | Norman Lear; adapted by Mike Royce and Gloria Calderon Kellett

RelatedPeak TV Treasure: Halt and Catch Fire

Number Of Episodes | 13 episodes (in Season 1)

Episode Length | 30 mins.

Premise | This reimagining of the Lear classic puts the focus on Penelope Alvarez (Six Feet Under »

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Norman Lear, Itvs to Receive Peabody Awards

12 April 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Television legend Norman Lear and the Independent Television Service (Itvs) have both been selected as recipients for this year’s Peabody Awards, Variety has learned.

The Peabody Awards, based at the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia, are reserved for individuals and institutions whose work and commitment to broadcast media define and transform the field.

Lear is well-known as a television producer and writer who helped bring racial and gender diversity to the medium, in addition to featuring characters with controversial and brash opinions. Among the hits that he worked on are “All in the Family,” “Sanford and Son,” “Maude,” “Good Times,” and “The Jeffersons.” Each show in its own way tackled sensitive issues like racial discrimination, sexism, homosexuality, abortion, and even rape.

Itvs, conceived by independent filmmakers who saw scarce diversity in public media, was formed by Congress in 1988. The service has helped fund more than 1,400 films and has received »

- Joe Otterson

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5 Reasons You Should Be Watching One Day at a Time

16 March 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

The Netflix reboot of One Day at a Time is a true homage to its predecessor. Inspired by the single-parent family dynamic of the original, the new series replaces the Romano household of Indianapolis with the Cuban-American Alvarez family from the Echo Park section of Los Angeles. The new One Day at a Time wastes no time diving into the topical issues of today. Subjects like sexism, Ptsd, immigration, and veteran's rights are handled with honesty and finesse, while managing to mine the comic gold inherent in the moment. Binge-worthy and aspirational in its social consciousness, each episode carries a powerful message interspersed with clever humor and witty dialogue. If that's not enough, here are five more reasons you should be watching One Day at a Time. Norman Lear is a producer. The legendary talent behind classic '70s sitcoms is the creator of the original series and has returned as producer for the reboot. »

- Susan Welsh

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A Medium With a Message: Inside TV’s Long History of Tackling Social Issues

14 March 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Abortion. Alcoholism. Pedophilia. Slumlords. Assisted suicide. Civil rights. Criminal justice reform.

These are all timely topics for television drama in 2017. But they were also tackled, with gritty realism, more than a half century ago on two landmark CBS series: “The Defenders” (1961-65), starring E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed as crusading father-and-son defense attorneys, and “East Side/West Side” (1963-64), featuring George C. Scott as a New York City social worker, with Cicely Tyson as his able secretary. Tyson’s series regular role, coupled with the fact that she appeared with her natural hair, was groundbreaking in a fraught period of civil rights struggles.

The New Frontier era ushered in by President John F. Kennedy’s election marked a moment when the networks made room for “prestige” narrative series that dealt with weighty social issues. The appetite for serious fare was stoked by the May 1961 declaration by Kennedy’s FCC chairman, Newton »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Netflix Renews ‘One Day at a Time’ for Season 2

4 March 2017 4:05 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Netflix has given a second-season order to the revival of “One Day at a Time.”

The Sony Pictures TV comedy, from Norman Lear and showrunners Mike Royce and Gloria Calderon Kellett, bowed in January to rapturous reviews. The multicamera laffer puts a contemporary spin on the groundbreaking 1970s CBS sitcom about a divorced mother. Justina Machado stars as a newly single mother trying to raise her two children, with the help of her mother.

Netflix has ordered 13 episodes for the second season. “One Day at a Time” marked a triumphant return to series TV by Lear, the legendary 94-year-old producer of such indelible TV hits as “All in the Family,” “Maude” and “Good Times.” The original series, which ran from 1975 to 1984, starred Bonnie Franklin, Mackenzie Phillips and Valerie Bertinelli.

The new-model “One Day at a Time” shifted the location from Indianapolis to the Echo Park area of Los Angeles. Machado is seen as an Emmy contender for »

- Cynthia Littleton

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‘The Golden Girls’ on Hulu: A Guide to 29 Wacky Moments to Watch Out For While You Binge

13 February 2017 9:40 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the gallery above, we’ve picked 29 moments among a multitude from “The Golden Girls,” the ‘80s-‘90s comedy that is available to binge in its entirety on Hulu now. Click through for a rough guide to what’s in store when you revisit Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia.

Read More: Friends of Dorothy: Was ‘The Golden Girls’ Really as Queer-Friendly as Its Reputation Suggests?

Created by Susan Harris, who had also created the controversial but critically acclaimed sitcom “Soap,” “The Golden Girls” was unlike anything America had seen before on TV. It centered on four older women living in one house in Miami, who, despite the gray in their hair (some of it camouflaged with dye), still had plenty of zest for life, sex, and troublemaking.

Based on their performances on “Maude” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” Rue McClanahan and Betty White were cast first. Director Jay Sandrich »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘The Golden Girls’ on Hulu: A Guide to 29 Wacky Moments to Watch Out For While You Binge

13 February 2017 9:40 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In the gallery above, we’ve picked 29 moments among a multitude from “The Golden Girls,” the ‘80s-‘90s comedy that is available to binge in its entirety on Hulu now. Click through for a rough guide to what’s in store when you revisit Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia.

Read More: Friends of Dorothy: Was ‘The Golden Girls’ Really as Queer-Friendly as Its Reputation Suggests?

Created by Susan Harris, who had also created the controversial but critically acclaimed sitcom “Soap,” “The Golden Girls” was unlike anything America had seen before on TV. It centered on four older women living in one house in Miami, who, despite the gray in their hair (some of it camouflaged with dye), still had plenty of zest for life, sex, and troublemaking.

Based on their performances on “Maude” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” Rue McClanahan and Betty White were cast first. Director Jay Sandrich »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Norman Lear on Ending His Long TV Absence With ‘One Day at a Time’

4 January 2017 9:45 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In the 1970s, Norman Lear reigned as TV’s most prolific and influential comedy writer and producer — the person responsible for such landmark shows as “All in the Family,” “The Jeffersons,” “Good Times,” “Sanford and Son,” and “Maude.” This month, Lear will end his 22-year absence from series television with the premiere of “One Day at a Time,” a reboot of his classic comedy about a single mother raising two children.

His return to a TV landscape that has shifted radically in his absence could not be timelier.

Sony, which acquired rights to Lear’s library when it purchased Columbia in 1989, had long been toying with the idea of rebuilding one of Lear’s comedies around a Latino family. It was the idea of Lear’s producing partner Brent Miller to focus on “One Day at a Time,” but Lear’s involvement was never in question, even before the wheels were rolling on the project.

“My »

- Daniel Holloway

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It Came From The Tube: A Cold Night’S Death (1973)

1 January 2017 11:59 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Sometimes a small cast and an intriguing premise are all that’s needed for effective TV horror. (And it makes it a hell of a lot cheaper to produce too.) Case in point: 1973’s A Cold Night’s Death, starring Eli Wallach and Robert Culp, a two man tour de force pitting man against man against the fragility of the human mind. Plus monkeys!

Acnd originally aired on Tuesday, January 30th as an ABC Movie of the Week, which was always a top 20 performer, getting trounced only by Maude and Hawaii Five-o over at CBS. (It’s hard to beat the combined star power of Bea Arthur and Jack Lord.) But fans of finely turned horror always knew that ABC was the place to be.

Let’s check out our brittle and frosted faux TV Guide to see what’s in store:

A Cold Night’S Death (Tuesday, 8:30pm, »

- Scott Drebit

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

14 items from 2017


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