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Derick Dillard Under Fire for Criticizing TLC Star Jazz Jennings, Claiming 'Transgender Is a Myth'

Derick Dillard Under Fire for Criticizing TLC Star Jazz Jennings, Claiming 'Transgender Is a Myth'
Derick Dillard‘s recent tweets about transgender teen Jazz Jennings have sparked outrage on social media.

The father of two — who stars on TLC’s Counting On alongside his wife, 19 Kids and Counting alum Jill (Duggar) Dillard — took to Twitter on Wednesday to issue his take on 16-year-old Jennings, the star of TLC’s I Am Jazz.

“What an oxymoron … a ‘reality’ show which follows a non-reality,” tweeted Dillard, 28, in response to a promotional tweet from the network about Jennings’ series.

” ‘Transgender’ is a myth,” he added. “Gender is not fluid; it’s ordained by God.”

What an oxymoron… a
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

13 crucial differences between Broadchurch and Gracepoint

Almost identical as they are, we look at what’s actually been changed between episode 1 of Broadchurch and Us adaptation, Gracepoint

Warning: contains spoilers for the first episodes of Broadchurch and Gracepoint.

With the same story, characters, scenes, dialogue, male lead and screenwriter, episode one of Fox’s Gracepoint is no fuzzy “inspired by” adaptation, but a shot-for-shot impersonation of the Broadchurch opener. If Fox hadn’t paid what is probably a handsome sum for the privilege, we’d rap its knuckles with a ruler for copying ITV’s homework.

Perhaps because it’s kept so close to the source, so far Gracepoint makes for a pretty decent murder mystery, if an entirely superfluous one for audiences of the original. If you know Broadchurch, then Gracepoint’s opening episode makes for an uncanny hour of déjà-vu television. Explaining it to someone else is like explaining the illogic of last night
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bill Pertwee obituary

Actor best known for playing the officious Arp warden William Hodges in Dad's Army

In his early days as a cabaret artist, the actor Bill Pertwee, who has died aged 86, did a manic cricket revue sketch at a fashionable club in central London. A haughty and inebriated diner kicked over his stumps and shouted: "How's that?" Pertwee punched him in the stomach and was escorted out by the head waiter, who informed him that the customer was always right. "As far as I'm concerned, he isn't!" retorted Pertwee.

This bubbling belligerence was successfully incorporated into the bossy character that made Pertwee famous: Arp Warden William Hodges in the celebrated BBC television series Dad's Army (1968-77), written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. As Hodges, he perpetually clashed with Captain George Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) of the Home Guard.

The inspiration for the way Pertwee played the warden came from his boyhood during the second world war,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bill Pertwee obituary

Actor best known for playing the officious Arp warden William Hodges in Dad's Army

In his early days as a cabaret artist, the actor Bill Pertwee, who has died aged 86, did a manic cricket revue sketch at a fashionable club in central London. A haughty and inebriated diner kicked over his stumps and shouted: "How's that?" Pertwee punched him in the stomach and was escorted out by the head waiter, who informed him that the customer was always right. "As far as I'm concerned, he isn't!" retorted Pertwee.

This bubbling belligerence was successfully incorporated into the bossy character that made Pertwee famous: Arp Warden William Hodges in the celebrated BBC television series Dad's Army (1968-77), written by Jimmy Perry and David Croft. As Hodges, he perpetually clashed with Captain George Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) of the Home Guard.

The inspiration for the way Pertwee played the warden came from his boyhood during the second world war,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Mrs Brown's Boys: how the 'worst comedy ever made' became a smash hit

The critics loathe it, calling it 'crass', and 'lazy trash'. But Brendan O'Carroll's sitcom has attracted an enormous, loyal following. Where did it come from and why is it so loved?

Where do TV comedy hits come from? Nobody knows, of course. If telly's top brass knew the answer to that, we'd have been spared David Jason in The Royal Bodyguard, or Amanda Holden under her Big Top. But, until recently, some things were taken for granted: the networks' next big hit was unlikely to be discovered playing to an audience of elderly women at the Glasgow Pavilion. It was unlikely to feature a 57-year-old man in a frock making jokes about rectal thermometers, and – in the event that it did – the cast surely wouldn't solely comprise that man's extended family and close friends. Oh, and its star wouldn't cite as his main influence the 70s double-act Cannon and Ball.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Fawlty Towers isn't racist. Major Gowen is

The BBC's cutting of racial insults from a repeat of The Germans has brought the integrity of the hit comedy show into question. But the words are clearly used to satirise English upper-class bigotry

Rivalled only by Dad's Army as Britain's most-loved sitcom, Fawlty Towers seems an unlikely candidate to merit comparison with the movies of Quentin Tarantino. But the BBC has cut from a repeat of the episode The Germans (screened many times since it was first seen in 1975) a speech in which the blimpish hotel resident Major Gowen uses two outlawed racial insults while reporting on a trip to see an England v India cricket match at the Oval.

It is impossible to discuss properly the censored dialogue without quoting the line. Very sensitive readers should stop now and it should not be assumed that I, the Guardian – or, indeed, John Cleese and Connie Booth, the show's writers
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Fawlty Towers isn't racist. Major Gowen is

The BBC's cutting of racial insults from a repeat of The Germans has brought the integrity of the hit comedy show into question. But the words are clearly used to satirise English upper-class bigotry

Rivalled only by Dad's Army as Britain's most-loved sitcom, Fawlty Towers seems an unlikely candidate to merit comparison with the movies of Quentin Tarantino. But the BBC has cut from a repeat of the episode The Germans (screened many times since it was first seen in 1975) a speech in which the blimpish hotel resident Major Gowen uses two outlawed racial insults while reporting on a trip to see an England v India cricket match at the Oval.

It is impossible to discuss properly the censored dialogue without quoting the line. Very sensitive readers should stop now and it should not be assumed that I, the Guardian – or, indeed, John Cleese and Connie Booth, the show's writers
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Seven to air ‘outrageous sitcom’ about Muslim community leader

The Seven Network is to air a sitcom about the “hilarious antics” of a self-appointed Muslim community leader.

According to the description of the show:

Citizen Khan follows the trials and tribulations of self-appointed Muslim community leader Mr Khan and his long-suffering family. Things would be so much easier if everyone listened to him and followed his lead, but his obsessively house-proud wife and two feisty daughters have other ideas. He finds a refuge of sorts in the local mosque run by new mosque manager Dave – who to Mr Khan’s chagrin is not only white, but ginger.”

The show has been bought from BBC Worldwide. The first series of six episodes aired in the UK earlier this year. A further seven episodes have been commissioned.

Angus Ross, Seven’s director of network programming: “The BBC has an established history of producing quality comedies and Citizen Khan is no exception.
See full article at Encore Magazine »

Love Thy Neighbour: Why I Can Still Be An Arsenal Fan And Not Hate Tottenham Hotspur

Disclaimer: This article is not an attack on football fans in general; the majority of which follow the game because of their love of the sport. It is simply an observation I have made about a small minority of people that I have met, spoken to or overheard. It isn’t my intention to offend anyone.

I’ve never been one for confrontation. Raised by parents who spent a combined 45+ years in the Police Force, I went to a Church of England Primary School, played for the football team that was often too nice to win games and the nearest I got to witnessing a fight before the age of 16 was watching ‘Ali’ (worth the wait). Say what you will about my sheltered childhood, it led me to becoming the person I am today. But before you condemn me for posting this article in the wrong section of this website
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Ra.One Character Sketches and More!

  • Bollyspice
Coming up this Diwali, October 26th is the Anubhav Sinha epic superhero/adventure/action/romance/comedy/music okay pretty much everything good all rolled into one film that stars the good Shah Rukh Khan, the beautiful Kareena Kapoor and the bad (we think since we have not seen him yet but sure he looks great) Arjun Rampal. Add to that are the exciting special appearances from Sanjay Dutt as The Villianous Villan – Khalnayak and Priyanka Chopra as The Damsel in Distress. Intriguing? We think so!

With the music release of the film happening tomorrow and with the totally killer cool Ra.One website live and since we promised you lots of treats leading up to the release of the film in October we thought we would give you a bit of the inside data on the characters that make up the Ra.One world!

Synopsis

A father trying hard to
See full article at Bollyspice »

The not-bleeding-likely lads

The Inbetweeners: The Movie sees Will, Simon, Neil and Jay transported, in all their puerile glory, to Crete. But do the writers and cast realise this is the end?

The feature film-of-the-sitcom is one of the less heralded genres in cinema. Forty years ago, when Hollywood's vision of a low-budget hit was the cool and radical Easy Rider, the British film industry couldn't have been eulogising a less glamorous form of transport, when Hammer brought the sitcom On the Buses to the big screen.

That first On the Buses film made more than a million pounds, and sparked a gold rush. 1973 saw nine films based on sitcoms, including Love Thy Neighbour, Father, Dear Father and even For the Love of Ada. By the end of the decade, though, the notoriously thin quality of the adaptations meant the genre had become irrevocably tarnished.

But in 1997, the astonishing success of Bean,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Three In A Bed' returns with 1.1m

Series two of Channel 4's Three In A Bed debuted with just over 1 million viewers on Thursday night, while Monroe again owned primetime, the latest audience data has revealed. Three In A Bed, in which three B&B owners rate each other's establishments, averaged 1.1m (4.8%) for Channel 4 in the 8pm hour and 317k (1.4%) on Channel 4 +1. Medical drama Monroe continued with 4.63m (20.2%) on ITV1 and 134k (0.8%) on timeshift, beating Crimewatch's 3.95m (17.3%) on BBC One. Earlier, Tonight: Charities In Crisis fetched 2.71m (12.8%) on ITV1 from 7.30pm and Diy Sos: The Big Build built 4.49m (19.7%) on BBC One in the 8pm hour. Question Time brought in 2.47m (21.6%) on BBC One from 10.45pm. Channel 4's Love Thy Neighbour found harmony with 920k (4%) in the 8pm hour and 159k (0.9%) on +1. 10'Clock Live (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Tonight's TV highlights: Windfarm Wars | Pretty Little Liars | Women In Love | V | The British At Work | Love Thy Neighbour

Windfarm Wars | Pretty Little Liars | Women In Love | V | The British At Work | Love Thy Neighbour

Windfarm Wars

7pm, BBC2

Debut of a timely series visiting the frontline of a conflict likely to grow ever more rancorous: the gathering squabble over whether windfarms work, and where, if anywhere, we should put them. This episode outlines the orders of battle. On one side is windfarm developer Rachel Ruffle, who wants to plant nine 120-metre-tall turbines in a valley a few miles from Dartmoor National Park, along with windfarm advocates who believe that the loping propellers are the future of energy production, and landowners who stand to gain. Arrayed against them are a local action group, who think the things are ugly and useless.

Andrew Mueller

Pretty Little Liars

8pm, MTV

Previously shown on Viva, this neat drama should fill Thursday night's Skins-shaped hole, though it's a much more traditional stab at teen TV.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Incest, blackmail, murder – but no minorities in Midsomer, please, we're English! | Hannah Pool

Midsomer Murders producer Brian True-May's comments about the whiteness of the show's village are insulting to all viewers

What do incest, blackmail and homosexuality have in common? They're all ideal Sunday evening television storylines according to the suspended Midsomer Murders producer Brian True-May. Race, however is not.

True-May gave an interview to this week's Radio Times in which he argued that his quaint little show would be ruined if it was forced to shoehorn in ethnic minorities characters.

"We just don't have ethnic minorities involved. Because it wouldn't be the English village with them. It just wouldn't work," he said.

It is of course true that the majority of Britain's ethnic minority population live in urban areas – according to the last census 45% of the non-white population live in London with most (but by no means all) of the rest in major cities like Birmingham, Leeds and Leicester.

When the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Tonight's TV highlights: Crufts 2011 | Hellcats | 30 Rock | The British At Work | Monroe | Love Thy Neighbour

Crufts 2011 | Hellcats | 30 Rock | The British At Work | Monroe | Love Thy Neighbour

Crufts 2011

7pm, More4

You'd imagine that Best In Show is to dog-show realism what Black Swan is to ballet, but Crufts always raises suspicion that there's some truth behind the mockumentary. Clare Balding presents highlights of this year's event, and it should be as brilliantly watchable as ever, particularly if you enjoy any level of kitsch or playing the "spot the dog-owner resemblance" game. Rebecca Nicholson

Hellcats

9pm, MTV

This brand new MTV series, based on Kate Torgovnick's book Cheer! Inside The Secret World Of College Cheerleaders, introduces us to Marti, a "goth" law student who, facing the prospect of losing her scholarship, has no choice but to join the college cheerleading team. If you like Glee, you'll like Hellcats. If you like Bring It On, you'll like Hellcats. If you like gymnastics combined with hip-hop dancing, you'll like Hellcats.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rewind TV: Jamie's Dream School; Attenborough and the Giant Egg; The Promise

Jamie Oliver's attempt to get 'brilliant people' to educate reluctant students gets off to a satisfyingly bad start

Jamie's Dream School (C4) | 4oD

Attenborough and the Giant Egg (BBC2) | iPlayer

The Promise (C4) | 4oD

There's a certain downcast expression that has become an essential part of Jamie Oliver's television career. During moments of high stress, we see the celebrity chef's cheery face creased with self-doubt as he ruminates on the possibility that he's bitten off more than he can chew, and no amount of extra virgin olive oil will help its digestion.

The paradox of this Gethsemane moment is that while it evokes the threat of failure, it confirms the programme's success. What it says to the audience is: "Can Jamie turn things round?" But what it means for the producers is: "It's Ok, we've got a show."

For where would Jamie's Dream School be if the students
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV review: Love Thy Neighbour; Famous, Rich and In the Slums

In a quiet Yorkshire village, a dozen couples battle it out to win their dream cottage ...

Hello and welcome to the new Channel 4 reality TV series How Racist Are You?, Brackets And Willing to Demonstrate on Television Close Brackets! Last night's first episode was broadcast under what I presume was its working title Love Thy Neighbour and followed the first two of a dozen couples who will compete to win a £300,000 Dream Cottage (stone walls, campanula and charm spilling out of the garden) in the village of Grassington in the north Yorkshire Dales.

Steve, a carpenter, and Nicky, a former solicitor, want to move out of Birmingham and make a fresh start in the country with her three obstreperous teenage children from a previous relationship. From what we see and hear of them, unless campanula has unexpected powers to soothe and unite, six months of intensive family therapy would seem a better investment.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Tonight's TV highlights

  • The Guardian - TV News
The Culture Show | Love Thy Neighbour | Working Girls | How to Make it in America | Human Planet | Glory Daze

The Culture Show

7pm, BBC2

Any surviving evidence of Afghanistan's tumultuous history has either been very fortunate, very robust, or very diligently protected. At the British Museum, Andrew Graham-Dixon surveys an exhibition of Afghan artefacts, some of which were hidden by the astonishingly brave staff of Kabul's National Museum in order to spare them from the brutal revisionism of the Taliban. Elsewhere, Clemency Burton-Hill meets Bartabas, the French showman who is bringing his equestrian choreography to Sadler's Wells.

Andrew Mueller

Love Thy Neighbour

9pm, Channel 4

Twelve families compete over six weeks to win a family home in the idyllic village of Grassington, in the Yorkshire Dales, whose residents will vote for those they think the most deserving. You may groan at the format, but this series promises to throw up all kinds of intriguing issues,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV turn-ons and turn-offs

This week's hits and misses

Louie Spence's Showbusiness

More gusset manipulation and ostentatious lisping from 40-denier "variety" fantasia

My Life In Books

Teatime literary bee extracts autobi(ibli)ographic gems from hitherto wearisome famouses

Dispatches

Ongoing journalistic brilliance from C4's designated "thought slot"

Jamie's Dream School

S Callow, D Starkey, R Winston et al reduced to purpling speechlessness by bellowing hobbledehoys. Hilarity ensues

Love Thy Neighbour

Bigotry-fanning rural wheeze strives for Straw Dogs; gets Camberwick Greige

Heston's Mission Impossible

Hexagon-skulled shill for profligacy castigates The Man plc for lack of liquid nitrogen/powdered mealworm in 17p convenience snacks? That's Helpful

BBC3's Working Girls

Another cheap holiday in other people's penury

Mrs Brown's Boys

Sure and it's an ill wind that blows this "sitcom" o'er from Rte, so it is

TelevisionSarah Dempster

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2011 | Use of this content is subject to our
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

I'm a huge fan of Top Gear. But this time I've had enough | Steve Coogan

Comedy can't always be safe, and sometimes entertainers need to challenge social orthodoxies. But 'saying the unsayable' is different from simply recycling offensive cliches about Mexicans

As a huge fan of Top Gear. I normally regard the presenters' brand of irreverence as a part of the rough and tumble that goes with having a sense of humour. I've been on the show three times and had a go at their celebrity-lap challenge, and I would love to receive a fourth invite. But I think that's unlikely once they have read this. If, however, it makes the Lads question their behaviour for a second – ambitious, I know – it will be worth it.

I normally remain below the parapet when these frenetic arguments about comedy and taste break out. But this time, I've had enough of the regular defence you tend to hear – the tired line that it's "just a laugh", a
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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