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Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86

Emmy-Winning TV Director Peter Baldwin Dies at 86
Peter Baldwin, who started as an actor and went on to become a prolific TV director throughout the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, died Nov. 19 in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 86.

Baldwin won a Primetime Emmy Award for directing “The Wonder Years” and a Cable Ace Award for “Dream On.”

Born in Winnetka, Ill., he was discovered by a Hollywood talent scout in his senior year at Stanford. He became one of Paramount’s “Golden Circle of Newcomers” and appeared in films including “Stalag 17,” “Little Boy Lost” and Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Ten Commandments.”

He served three years in the Navy and returned to Paramount, where he appeared in “The Tin Star” and “Teacher’s Pet” with Clark Gable and Doris Day.

After touring with Julie Harris in “The Warm Peninsula” play, Baldwin moved to Italy, where he appeared in films by Robert Rossellini, Dino Risi and Francesco Rosi. There he started
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Bob Newhart Show: Conan O'Brien & Stars Celebrate 45th Anniversary

The Bob Newhart Show premiered on CBS on September 16, 1972, starring Newhart as psychologist Dr. Robert Hartley, with Suzanne Pleshette playing his wife, Emily Hartley. It ran for six seasons, and ended on April 1, 1978, with its 142nd episode. Bill Daily, Peter Bonerz, and Marcia Wallace also starred. The CBS sitcom also featured a large recurring cast, including Jack Riley, Tom Poston, and Howard Hesseman. To commemorate The Bob Newhart Show's 45th anniversary, the Television Academy threw a celebration Tuesday night, at the Wolf Theatre in North Hollywood, hosted by Conan O'Brien and featuring Newhart, himself. Check out the photos at the end of this
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Why Bob Newhart Wanted to ‘Intentionally’ Break Boundaries in Television

Why Bob Newhart Wanted to ‘Intentionally’ Break Boundaries in Television
On Sept. 16, 1972, CBS premiered the beloved sitcom “The Bob Newhart Show,” starring the popular comic as Chicago psychologist Dr. Bob Hartley.

The funny and whip smart sitcom only received four Emmy nominations during its six seasons. But Tuesday evening at the Wolf Theatre in North Hollywood, the TV Academy paid homage to the show —which is celebrating its 45th anniversary — with a sparkling and hilarious conversation between 88-year-old Bob Newhart and Conan O’Brien.

“I’m so glad about tonight,” proclaimed Newhart on the academy’s recognition of the series’ milestone anniversary.

O’Brien, who had worked with Newhart on a comedy bit at the 2006 Emmy Awards, said he grew up watching “The Bob Newhart Show” on Saturday nights after “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and before “The Carol Burnett Show” with his brothers and father.

Peter Bonerz joined Newhart and O’Brien about an hour into the 90-minute tribute. “You
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bob Newhart Talks Don Rickles, ‘The Bob Newhart Show’ With Conan

Bob Newhart was Conan O’Brien’s late-night guest on Monday, celebrating the 45th anniversary of The Bob Newhart Show. In the course of their conversation, Newhart talked about his introduction to Don Rickles, as well as another comic who stole his material, the glaring error in The Bob Newhart Show‘s opening credits, and how ineffective his Dr. Hartley was as a therapist. Newhart and Conan have known each other a long time; Newhart having starred in a memorable…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Hulu Adds Himym, NYPD Blue, White Collar, M*A*S*H, Dollhouse and Others

Hulu Adds Himym, NYPD Blue, White Collar, M*A*S*H, Dollhouse and Others
How I Met Your Mother, Burn Notice and the acclaimed Korean War dramedy M*A*S*H are among the series of which Hulu will now be streaming every episode, as part of a monster deal with 20th Century Fox Television Distribution.

Other series set to make their Hulu debut in the coming weeks include Raising Hope, White Collar, The Glades, Dollhouse, NYPD Blue, The Unit, Better Off Ted and Witches of East End.

Additionally, the complete libraries for Glee and Bones will finally be available on the streamer.

RelatedSissy Spacek, Jane Levy Join Cast of Hulu’s Castle Rock

All told,
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘Baywatch’ Origin Story: How One Lifeguard Turned His Dream Into A Hassle That Paid Hoff

‘Baywatch’ Origin Story: How One Lifeguard Turned His Dream Into A Hassle That Paid Hoff
Gregory Bonann was a lifeguard at Will Rogers State Beach in 1977 when he helped two children who were caught in a riptide. That rescue would ultimately change his life – and the face of television, setting the stage for the eventual “Baywatch” juggernaut.

Now, with the new feature adaptation of “Baywatch” in theaters this weekend, it’s time to revisit the unusual story of how the lifeguard show made it on the air – ultimately producing 242 episodes before ending its run in 2001.

It all started because it turns out Bonnan had saved the children of Stu Erwin, an executive at Mtm – the independent production company behind series like “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “The Bob Newhart Show,” and run by legendary exec Grant Tinker.

While visiting Mtm’s offices in Studio City, Bonann pitched Erwin on a drama about lifeguards. The company passed, but Bonann took the opportunity to learn all about the TV biz.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Baywatch’ Origin Story: How One Lifeguard Turned His Dream Into A Hassle That Paid Hoff

‘Baywatch’ Origin Story: How One Lifeguard Turned His Dream Into A Hassle That Paid Hoff
Gregory Bonann was a lifeguard at Will Rogers State Beach in 1977 when he helped two children who were caught in a riptide. That rescue would ultimately change his life – and the face of television, setting the stage for the eventual “Baywatch” juggernaut.

Now, with the new feature adaptation of “Baywatch” in theaters this weekend, it’s time to revisit the unusual story of how the lifeguard show made it on the air – ultimately producing 242 episodes before ending its run in 2001.

It all started because it turns out Bonnan had saved the children of Stu Erwin, an executive at Mtm – the independent production company behind series like “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “The Bob Newhart Show,” and run by legendary exec Grant Tinker.

While visiting Mtm’s offices in Studio City, Bonann pitched Erwin on a drama about lifeguards. The company passed, but Bonann took the opportunity to learn all about the TV biz.
See full article at Indiewire »

Book Excerpt: “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms”

Mary Tyler Moore and Susan Silver

The following is excerpted from Susan Silver’s “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms,” which will be released May 2.

(Author’s Note: Iris Rainer Dart, my then writing partner who later went on to write “Beaches,” had gotten pregnant and we had stopped working together. It was 1971. We were managed by comedy legend Garry Marshall and had written one script for “Love, American Style.”)

After Iris and I split up as a writing team, I was starting all over again, trying to “make it on my own” as those famous “Mary Tyler Moore Show” lyrics said. I told Garry that I’d seen her new show and knew I could write it. How did I know? It’s called “chutzpah,” French for “balls.” And I had some, it seems. Actually, she was situated in the Midwest, worked in a small local TV station, and so had I, both those things. It seemed like fate.

Because Garry knew the guys there, they were willing to take his recommendation about me, though I had nothing to show them written alone. I rehearsed over and over in the car as I drove to the studio. I’m sure passersby thought I was a crazy person as I animatedly “delivered my material” checking my expressions in the rear view mirror. I was nervous but determined. I had wanted this so long and now was my big chance.

I pitched three stories to Jim Brooks and Allan Burns, the creators of the show, a little intimidating though nice, and David Davis and Lorenzo Music, the story editors. Lorenzo doubled as the voice of the marvelous droll Carlton the Doorman on “Rhoda,” as well a lot of other voice over work. He and David were in my corner from the beginning, realizing how hard this was for a new writer. They laughed whole heartedly, and I kept eye contact with them as I “performed.” They were so supportive and sweet, and I am forever grateful.

I left the office with the promise of an assignment if they got picked up for a full season. Which, fortunately they did. Surprisingly enough, CBS was not sure about the show and initially stuck it on a Tuesday. Believe it or not, the reviews were not good. Remember the times: It was not common for a woman in the early seventies to not want to be married first and foremost. This character’s fiance had dumped her! To be a career woman with stirrings of feminism, sticking up for one’s self, was not expected in a TV heroine. Here was an actress who had been the beloved wife of Dick Van Dyke! Now she was at work, forming a family with colleagues, and starting friendships with women who were not always that friendly! Radical thinking, particularly about Mary, America’s sweetheart, who every man loved and wanted to protect and every woman wanted to be. This could be dangerous to women viewers and their roles in society.

Fortunately, for me and the show, Fred Silverman, the whip smart exec who came in, moved it to Saturday where it became part of the must-see lineup, later with “Mash,” “Bob Newhart,” “All the In the Family,” and “Carol Burnett.”

That lineup — along with the growing Women’s Movement, which latched on to the show as important — got the Mary Tyler Moore franchise a lot of attention. In comedy as in life, “timing was everything.” I should have been terrified, writing this script alone. But ignorance is bliss.

I always say, “I started on the top and it was downhill after that.” That wasn’t really true, but the Mtm experience was so far superior to any other. Other shows would give you a twenty-minute story meeting and send you home to write. Then sometimes they’d wonder why the script was “not what they had in mind.” At Mtm, once I got my assignment, we had an all day story meeting while we fleshed out the story together. This gave a detailed blueprint from which to begin.

Frankly, if I’d had a struggle to get an assignment, I don’t know if I would have been able to hang, make it at all. I may have been gutsy, but I was not resilient, or so I thought back then.

Susan Silver wrote for some of the most iconic sitcoms of all time, creating laughs for “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Maude,” “Partridge Family,” and more. She was one of the first females in an industry dominated by men. Now she dishes about the highs and lows of her comedy career and life in her memoir, “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms.”

Book Excerpt: “Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Bob Newhart Likes to Encourage Newcomers

Bob Newhart Likes to Encourage Newcomers
Bob Newhart started out as a standup, and scored massive, award-winning hits with his groundbreaking comedy records. That was before he became a comedy and TV legend, having starred in 1970s hit sitcom “The Bob Newhart Show” and 1980s comedic staple “Newhart” as a Chicago therapist and a New England innkeeper, respectively. While he scored his first Emmy nomination as a writer for the 1962 “The Bob Newhart Show,” incredibly, Newhart didn’t win an Emmy until the 2013 season of “Big Bang Theory” as a guest actor. Although known best for his TV work, he was a memorable Papa Elf in 2003 holiday classic “Elf.” Newhart’s first mention in a Variety was in a review on March 18, 1959, of “Chicago Nightline.” The critic didn’t like the show, but liked him, saying he “has given ample evidence that he can become the No. 1 funnyman on local channels.”

How did you get on “Chicago Nightline”?

Dan Sorkin, a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

From TV Star to Executive: Mary Tyler Moore’s Most Iconic Moments

From TV Star to Executive: Mary Tyler Moore’s Most Iconic Moments
Mary Tyler Moore never set out to be one of the pioneers of television, but with her warmth and comedic chops, she cemented a legacy for generations of fans thanks to her groundbreaking work in the medium, both onscreen and behind the camera. Moore died on Wednesday from a cardiopulmonary arrest after contracting pneumonia, her publicist confirmed to Et. She was 80.

Moore first rose to prominence on The Dick Van Dyke Show, playing the slightly daffy wife to Van Dyke’s TV writer character from 1961-66. She then branched out on her own with The Mary Tyler Moore Show, on which she became a feminist icon as a single, working woman. During the show’s run, from 1970 to 1977, she was nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series every year and won a total of three awards.

After her eponymous show ended, Moore deftly moved into films and Broadway shows, working with the
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Mary Tyler Moore Appreciation: She Turned The World On With A Smile And Then Some!

Not many are lucky enough to say this, but I can. The first “gig” I got in this business was at Mtm Enterprises, hanging around the set of The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Bob Newhart Show. One of my very first wide-eyed memories of actually realizing my dream of being a part of show business was meeting Mary Tyler Moore during rehearsal on her soundstage at CBS’ Radford studios in Studio City, where I stupidly asked, “Were you really the Happy Hotpoint elf?” I had boned…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Mary Tyler Moore Appreciation: She Turned The World On With A Smile And Then Some!

Not many are lucky enough to say this, but I can. The first “gig” I got in this business was at Mtm Enterprises, hanging around the set of The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Bob Newhart Show. One of my very first wide-eyed memories of actually realizing my dream of being a part of show business was meeting Mary Tyler Moore during rehearsal on her soundstage at CBS’ Radford studios in Studio City, where I stupidly asked, “Were you really the Happy Hotpoint elf?” I had boned…
See full article at Deadline »

How Mary Tyler Moore Paved the Way for Complicated Women on TV

How Mary Tyler Moore Paved the Way for Complicated Women on TV
If the only credit on the resume of Mary Tyler Moore, who died today, had been “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” that would still be enough to put her in the company of entertainment industry legends.

The word “iconic” gets thrown around a lot, but that long-running show truly merited the word. It was a recognizable and reliably pleasurable workplace comedy, but “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” was also a lot of other things. It was a showcase for a cast of character actors who created one of the greatest ensembles in TV history; each character was memorable in his or her own right, and the performers found the complicated human beings underneath the tics, flaws, and insecurities of these messy, amusing people.

Of course, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” was also a referendum of sorts on what a woman could be, on TV and in real life. Mary Richards was a career woman who remained single
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oprah Winfrey on Mary Tyler Moore’s Profound Impact on Her — and That Time She Made Her Cry!

Oprah Winfrey on Mary Tyler Moore’s Profound Impact on Her — and That Time She Made Her Cry!
As one of television’s first female icons, Mary Tyler Moore — who died Wednesday at 80 — inspired millions. But none quite as much as Oprah Winfrey.

Winfrey was Moore’s biggest fan and honored her often on Winfrey’s similarly eponymous show.

“I wanted to be Mary Tyler Moore. I wanted to be Mary, I wanted to live where Mary lived, I wanted Mr. Grant in my life, I wanted my boss to act like that, I wanted Ted,” Winfrey said in a video.

In 1997, Winfrey even recreated the opening credits of the The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Moore showed
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

12 Classic Shows You Didn’t Know Mary Tyler Moore Was Involved With Behind the Scenes (Photos)

  • The Wrap
12 Classic Shows You Didn’t Know Mary Tyler Moore Was Involved With Behind the Scenes (Photos)
The Mary Tyler Moore Show” (1970-1977) The acclaimed sitcom that bears Mary Tyler Moore‘s name ran for seven season and won numerous awards. It cemented Moore as a comedy legend. Mtm also produced the show. “Rhoda” (1974-1978) This spin-off from “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” included numerous ties back to the show that spawned it, running for five seasons. It was produced by Mtm and won two Emmys and a Golden Globe. “The Bob Newhart Show” (1972-1978) Produced by Mtm, “The Bob Newhart Show” is also often ranked among the best TV shows ever. It received numerous award nominations during its six-season run.
See full article at The Wrap »

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television
James Burrows, perhaps the most successful TV director in history, owes his lengthy small screen career to Grant Tinker.

Tinker, who died Monday at 90, was a towering television titan who turned Mtm Enterprises into one of the most successful production companies in the 1970s, then took over NBC and led that network from worst to first in the 1980s.

But his legacy lives on, thanks to the writers, producers, directors and stars he championed during his long career. Burrows, who recently directed his 1,000th episode of television (which NBC celebrated with a primetime special), is one of them.

“I owe my entire television career to him,” Burrows told IndieWire.

Burrows was a theater director and stage manager in New York when he worked on the musical “Holly Golightly” (later retitled “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), starring Mary Tyler Moore and Richard Chamberlain. The show closed after just four nights, but by the end,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television

  • Indiewire
Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television
James Burrows, perhaps the most successful TV director in history, owes his lengthy small screen career to Grant Tinker.

Tinker, who died Monday at 90, was a towering television titan who turned Mtm Enterprises into one of the most successful production companies in the 1970s, then took over NBC and led that network from worst to first in the 1980s.

But his legacy lives on, thanks to the writers, producers, directors and stars he championed during his long career. Burrows, who recently directed his 1,000th episode of television (which NBC celebrated with a primetime special), is one of them.

“I owe my entire television career to him,” Burrows told IndieWire.

Burrows was a theater director and stage manager in New York when he worked on the musical “Holly Golightly” (later retitled “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), starring Mary Tyler Moore and Richard Chamberlain. The show closed after just four nights, but by the end,
See full article at Indiewire »

Fanatic Feed: Masters of Sex Finished, An Icon Lost and More

  • TVfanatic
Today Hollywood said goodbye to one of the most important entertainment executives of the 20th Century.

Grant Tinker, who helped usher in such great programming such as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Bob Newhart Show, St. Elsewhere, Family Ties and Hill Street Blues died at the age of 90.

Tinker, started as a trainee on NBC radio in 1949 and subsequently witnessed the birth of television. No matter where he was, his finger was on the pulse.

In the '50s he worked at McCAnn Erickson, as advertising was the place to influence TV (you remember them from Mad Men, right?).

He visited the pilot of Dick Van Dyke in 1961 and was married to star Mary Tyler Moore in 1962. They created Mtm Enterprises and delivered Mary Tyler Moore Show for CBS, garnering 29 Emmy Awards over its run.

He and Moore split in 1981, and he left Mtm Enterprises.

Later NBC needed his
See full article at TVfanatic »

Former NBC, Mtm Chief Grant Tinker Dies at 90

Former NBC chairman and CEO, Grant Tinker, has died at the age of 90. Together with Mary Tyler Moore, to whom he was married from 1962 to 1982, Tinker formed Mtm Enterprises. According to reports, he died at home in California, on November 28, 2016.The production company produced iconic TV sitcoms such as The Mary Tyler Moore Show and its spin-offs Rhoda and Phyllis, as well as The Bob Newhart Show and Wkrp in Cincinnati. Mtm Enterprises was also behind critically acclaimed dramas like Hill Street Blues and St. Elsewhere -- and another Mtm spin-off -- Lou Grant.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Remembering Grant Tinker: TV Giant’s Legacy Is All Around Us

Remembering Grant Tinker: TV Giant’s Legacy Is All Around Us
Grant Tinker has died, but he is still with us.

You can catch glimpses of the legendary TV executive’s legacy in so many places. Shows that were developed or championed by Tinker set the stage for much of what’s great about TV now. Of course, the programs that he helped birth during his time at Mtm and NBC were all over the map, and they can’t be limited by an easily defined set of qualities.

But if it’s not presumptuous to say so, I think I saw pieces of Tinker’s soul in the best of the shows that were made on his watch.

Few things rile me more than the idea that TV would be better if it weren’t for the interfering, heartless suits who ruin everything. That’s just lazy thinking. Yes, such creatures exist; TV has always had executives who get in the way of enduring quality and creative
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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