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Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) - Plot Summary Poster

Plot Summary

  • Divorced working woman Alex and well-to-do Jewish family doctor Daniel Hirsh share not only the same answering service but also the favours of young Bob Elkin who bed-hops between them as the mood takes him. Both Alex and Dr Hirsh are aware of the other's existence but prefer to live with the situation rather than risk losing Elkin completely. But a wet winter weekend in London can be difficult.

    - Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}
  • In London, employment consultant Alex Greville and Dr. Daniel Hirsh are each in a relationship with much younger industrial artist Bob Elkin. Alex and Daniel, who have mutual friends besides Bob, know about the other in Bob's life. Within each coupling, both partners profess to love the other. Conversely, Bob easily moves between Alex and Daniel, especially when he starts to feel penned in by one, or has an argument with one. Alex and Daniel, who give each other the space when with Bob, accept the situation if only to hold onto their small piece of Bob out of that love and a need to fill the void caused by other issues in their lives. Alex is at a crossroads professionally, she who is contemplating quitting her less than satisfying job, without a sense of what to do in its place. Although comfortable with his homosexual orientation when with his friends, Daniel, feeling generations of Jewish guilt, has not told his family, who still expect him someday to get married and have children, despite he being in middle age. Their respective family situations and a move by Bob may show them what the future lies for their love triangle.

    - Written by Huggo
  • A Jewish doctor, Daniel Hirsh and a middle-aged woman, Alex Greville are both having affairs with the same male artist, Bob Elkin. Not only are Hirsh and Greville aware that Elkin is seeing the other but they actually know each other as well. Despite this, they are willing to put up with the situation through fear of losing Elkin who switches freely between them. Schlesinger's film highlights some worrying facts about how much people's attitudes to relationships and each other have changed over just two generations.

    - Written by David Claydon <dc6212@bristol.ac.uk>

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