Reazione a catena
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12 items from 2013


Icons of Fright Presents Josh Soriano’s Top 10 Horror of 2013!

30 December 2013 10:26 AM, PST | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Editor’s Note: Justin here! All month long we’ve been posting lists containing our top horror picks of 2013, and our regular contributor Josh Soriano (one of the main driving forces behind our A Look Back and Exploitation Alley columns!) has selected his ten choices. Read on below!

10 – Evil Dead Let’s face it, if each one of our beloved horror classics were its own train, they’d all stop in Remaketown at some point. I’m ok with that when there are remakes like Evil Dead. Instead of trying to replace the original, this one maintains respect towards the legacy and becomes the coolest, nastiest, alternative possible. The best part? Even if the welcome wears after a few viewings, you can still have a blast by showing it to others and watching them react to the projectile blood vomit and eye stabbing with a needle. 9 – The Conjuring This is kind of an oxymoron, »

- Justin Edwards

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Friday The 13th Tribute To "Friday The 13th" (1980)

13 December 2013 9:19 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Ernie Magnotta

Over the years, Friday the 13th has been called many things. Upon its release in May of 1980, critics who reviewed the low budget, independent wonder called it everything from a blatant Halloween clone (which director Sean Cunningham never denied it was) to an overly violent dead teenager movie made with no apparent talent or intelligence.

Gene Siskel was so outraged by the film that he called Cunningham “one of the most despicable creatures ever to infest the movie business.” Siskel even went so far as to publish the home address of actress Betsy Palmer (who gives a magnificent performance in the film) and he encouraged fans to write to her and express their disappointment in her taking a role in such a ghastly film.

Why did this creepy little horror film strike such a negative chord in critics all over the country? To answer that question, we »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Afm: eOne Takes 'The Hunted,' 'April Apocalypse'

9 November 2013 11:37 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Entertainment One has picked up North American rights for two new horror titles at Afm, the zombie comedy April Apocalypse from Preferred Content and the horror thriller The Hunted from Wme Global. The directorial debut of actor Josh Stewart, The Hunted focuses on two men hunting out in the West Virginia mountains who suddenly become the hunted. Brett Forbes and Patrick Rizzotti produced via their Fortress Features banner. Afm: Ryan Kavanaugh Predicts Summer 'Blood Bath' for Majors  April Apocalypse is a zom rom com focusing on a shy guy who finally gets up the courage to ask his dream girl

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»

- Scott Roxborough

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31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 75

30 October 2013 8:56 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time for one reason: the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. I am including documentaries, short films and mini series, only as special mentions – along with a few features that can qualify as horror, but barely do.

****

Special Mention:

Häxan

Directed by Benjamin Christensen

Denmark / Sweden, 1922

Häxan (a.k.a The Witches or Witchcraft Through The Ages) is a 1922 silent documentary about the history of witchcraft, »

- Ricky

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19 Things We Learned From the Original ‘Friday the 13th’ Commentary

12 September 2013 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The original Friday the 13th caught a lot of critical heat back in 1980, and now many people see it as little more than another in a long line of generic slasher films, but it actually deserves a lot more credit than that. It obviously wasn’t the first of the genre, that honor would probably go to films like Black Christmas and A Bay of Blood, but it (along with Halloween and A Nightmare On Elm Street) began a long, three-way race for horror franchise supremacy that affected the genre for decades. This week sees a new Friday the 13th release hitting shelves, appropriately enough on Friday the 13th, consisting of all twelve films in the series (including the 2009 reboot) in a Complete Collection. It’s not actually as complete as it could or should have been, but one special feature it does include is a commentary track for the very first film. It »

- Rob Hunter

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Why You Should Buy Arrow Video’s Blu-Ray of ‘Kidnapped’ over Kino’s

4 September 2013 11:47 AM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

I’m a huge Mario Bava fan. For those of you that have been following the site and the podcast, you already know this. While he is growing to be a bit more appreciated, I still find him to be the best of the Italian genre directors. Yes, even above Dario Argento & Lucio Fulci. What Argento & Fulci provide are visual assaults courtesy of color, violence and gore. Bava, on the other hand, can do those things but he has coherent stories in his films. Look, I like Fulci & Argento but there is no question that I am a Bava fan. Arrow Video was first out of the gate to release some Bava on Blu-Ray with Bay of Blood (aka Twitch of the Death Nerve and other titles) and Kino has been releasing Bava’s films Stateside.

One of my favorite Bava films, hell maybe even one of my top 20 films of all time, »

- Andy Triefenbach

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[Home Invasion] Blu-Ray & DVD Releases on September 3, 2013

3 September 2013 12:22 PM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

Home Invasion is a weekly post every Tuesday which shows you what is being released on Blu-Ray & DVD today! We scoured through Amazon to bring you everything you might be interested in. Our Picks of the Week are releases that we are looking forward to checking out, have reviewed and/or were are Picks of the Week on the Dtb Podcast. All descriptions are courtesy of Amazon.com unless noted otherwise. If you are thinking about purchasing any of these items, by clicking via the links provided, you are supporting Dtb. Thank you!

Price:

Click Here to buy the Blu-rayClick Here to buy the DVD

Find out where some of those Friday the 13th films got some of their kills. Not to mention, this is one of my favorites from director Mario Bava.

When a rich countess is murdered, it’s a race to see who’ll inherit her estate »

- Andy Triefenbach

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The Best Blu-ray & DVD Releases of the Week – ‘Stories We Tell,’ ‘A Bay of Blood,’ ‘Cockneys vs Zombies’ and More

3 September 2013 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. Stories We Tell Sarah Polley, best known for her work both in front of and behind the camera for feature films, turns her eye onto her own family in documentary form as she explores a part of their history from varying perspectives. Through interviews and home videos she goes back in time to explore her parents lives, her own childhood, and a secret they all think they know. What starts as a focus on a mystery becomes something more as stories, recollections, and memories differ from person to person. In a year filled with fantastic and powerful documentaries, Polley’s film remains the warmest and most wondrous thanks both to the content and the film’s structure. She’s on this journey with us, equally unsure of her own motivations and delighted by the results »

- Rob Hunter

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Review: Slice And Dice: The Slasher Film Forever

12 May 2013 3:34 AM, PDT | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Norman Bates once said “We all go a little crazy sometimes,” but never has this been truer than in the genre that spawned everybody's favourite mother's boy. I speak, of course, of the slasher film, the roots of which can arguably be traced back to Psycho (1960), Alfred Hitchcock's monochrome masterpiece.

Though there are cases for other films being the trigger point for the modern stalk and slash movie, notably Mario Bava's Bay of Blood (1971), Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom (1960), and even the various celluloid incarnations of Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians, all of which are put forward by the contributors in Calum Waddell and Naomi Holwill's Slice and Dice: The Slasher Film Forever, it was Psycho that brought murder to the masses and opened the vein for what was to follow.

Slice and Dice: The Slasher Film Forever is out on 13th May 2013 in a splatter-packed two disc set. »

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‘Baron Blood’ Blu-ray Review

6 May 2013 1:02 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Joseph Cotten, Elke Sommer, Massimo Girotti, Rada Rassimov, Antonio Cantafora, Umberto Raho, Luciano Pigozzi | Written by Vincent Fotre | Directed by Mario Bava

Italian director Mario Bava was responsible for some truly great horror movies of the 60s and 70s, including The Mask of Satan, Black Sabbath, Blood and Black Lace, Lisa and the Devil and proto-slasher A Bay of Blood. However some, whilst a success at the time, haven’t aged quite so well… like Baron Blood.

The film is yet another gothic horror from Bava that, like Black Sunday before it, features a witch’s curse – this time placed on Baron Otto von Kleist, Austria’s legendarily murderous ‘Baron Blood’, whose corpse is inadvertently revived when an ancient incantation is read out as a joke by a descendant and his girlfriend. Naturally, the Baron decides to carry on where he originally left off, with the help of an »

- Phil Wheat

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‘Nest of Vipers’ showcases Giulio Petroni’s complex plotting and atmospheric set pieces

23 January 2013 6:43 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Nest of Vipers (Night of the Serpent)

Directed by Giulio Petroni

Italy, 1969

Though Giulio Petroni has only rather few titles to his name when compared with his prolific, and better known, counterparts, the Italian director does have the bragging rights of working with both Lee Van Cleef (Death Rides a Horse, 1967) and Orson Welles (Tepepa, 1969).

It’s Petroni’s Nest of Vipers, recently released alongside Pierro Pierotti’s less successful Tails You Lose (1969), by Wild East Productions, that showcases the director’s talent for complex plotting and atmospheric set pieces.

Similar to the earlier Ringo series by Duccio Tessari, and to the now time-honored traditions of Leone and Corbucci, the structure of Nest of Vipers pits the outsider (here, and often, the“gringo”) versus a band of outlaws, where a largely unassuming and tight-knit community is caught in between and unawares.

Luke Askew, probably best known for roles in Easy Rider and Cool Hand Luke, »

- Neal Dhand

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New Netflix Horror includes The Devil Inside, The Theatre Bizarre, Red Lights

2 January 2013 11:52 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

December was a slow month for horror additions to the Netflix streaming library, but we wanted to let readers know about a handful of new titles that were recently released, including The Devil Inside, Night of the Living Dead: Reanimation and The Grudge 3. Don’t forget that all completed seasons of Supernatural are still available on Netflix, along with Seasons 1 and 2 of The Walking Dead.

There are also four seasons of The Twilight Zone available, which we always recommend to horror fans that don’t own the entire series already. Below is a list of many of the newly released titles, along with titles we previously covered. Keep in mind that this list is from the Us Netflix streaming library and may differ depending on the deals Netflix has in place in other countries.

December/Early January Updates:

Hell 7 Below The Theatre Bizarre The Grudge 3 The Devil Inside »

- Jonathan James

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12 items from 2013


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