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Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Griffin Dunne on Convincing Joan Didion to Make a Netflix Documentary

Griffin Dunne on Convincing Joan Didion to Make a Netflix Documentary
Joan Didion has been at the center of our cultural and political life for more than five decades, writing incisively on everything from war to rock music to murder in books such as “Slouching Towards Bethlehem” “The White Album,” and “Salvador.” As an essayist, novelist, critic, and screenwriter, she’s inspired a passionate following that is nearly unmatched in American letters. That status reached near deification levels with 2005’s “The Year of Magical Thinking.” In it, she reflects on her own personal tragedy, recounting her grief after the death of her husband John Gregory Dunne and her struggle to deal with the fatal illness of her daughter, Quintana Roo. By writing so unflinchingly about such a painful topic, she formed an even deeper connection with her readers.

It took her nephew, the filmmaker Griffin Dunne, to convince Didion to do what she had long resisted — sit down and shareher personal and professional remembrances on camera. The fruits
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution

Filmmaking Legends on How New York’s Era of Decay Sparked a Creative Revolution
In the 1970s and early ’80s, New York City embodied the revolution taking place in American cinema. It was brash and brutal, crude and powerful, sexy and grimey, and had a swagger that was unmistakable.

It was also a low point for the city. The Bronx was burning, crime was rising and city hall was broke. But even as respectable folks fled for the safety of the suburbs, New York became a canvas for talented filmmakers. From “The French Connection” to “Saturday Night Fever,” it posed as the setting of classic films that ushered in a new era of on-screen realism. It was the age of De Niro and Pacino, Scorsese and Lumet, talents who upended the sterile and factory-like approach to making movies that dominated the studio system.

It’s a revolution in filmmaking that’s over. Just as Times Square, the setting of “Taxi Driver,” has been replaced by a fantasyland for tourists, movies
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New York Film Festival: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See This Year, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’

  • Indiewire
New York Film Festival: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See This Year, From ‘Lady Bird’ to ‘Last Flag Flying’
The New York Film Festival kicks off later this week, sending us straight into the second half of a very busy fall festival season. In preparation for the festival, we’ve pinpointed its most exciting offerings, from never-before-seen narratives to insightful new documentaries, and plenty of previously-screened features looking to capitalize on strong word of mouth coming out of fellow tests like Venice, Telluride, and Toronto. In short, there’s plenty to experience in the coming weeks, so consider this your roadmap to the best of the fest.

Read More:Bryan Cranston Enters Oscar Race with New York Film Festival Opener ‘Last Flag Flying

Ahead, 13 essential titles — from buzzy world premieres to highlights from the 2017 circuit— that we can’t wait to see at this year’s New York Film Festival.

Arthur Miller: Writer

Documentaries about family members are always a dubious proposition. Some can also come across as overindulgent exercises,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Current Debate: Race in "Good Time"

  • MUBI
In the first scene of Good Time, the latest from directors Josh and Benny Safdie, Connie Nikas (Robert Pattinson) barges into an office where a social worker is interviewing his brother Nick (Benny Safdie), who has a mental disability and impaired hearing. From there, the two brothers are off to the races, as Benjamin Mercer writes at Reverse Shot:Almost immediately after, Connie is hauling Nick along with him on an ill-conceived robbery of a bank branch in Flushing, Queens. “Do you think I could have done that without you standing next to me, being strong?” Connie reassures Nick right after the job—and just before a paint bomb goes off in their bag of stolen cash, filling the cab they’re in with red vapor and sending it off the road. The accident, an eye-poppingly entropic moment staged by the Safdies and captured as if on the fly by cinematographer Sean Price Williams,
See full article at MUBI »

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese
Netflix is adding two new documentaries to its crowded 2017 roster: “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.” and “Voyeur,” both of which will premiere at the 55th New York Film Festival and launch globally on Netflix later this year.

Read More:Documentary, Now: Three Rock Stars Who Run The Fast-Changing Nonfiction World

Author Joan Didion’s nephew, actor-director-producer Griffin Dunne, has been laboring on this portrait of his aunt for years. The film spans more than 50 years of essays, novels, screenplays, and criticism, as Didion chronicled America’s cultural and political tides, from the literati scene of New York in the 1950s and early ’60s to her home state of California, where she wrote “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” and such film scripts as “The Panic in Needle Park.”

Dunne unearths a trove of archival footage and interviews his aunt at length about the many people she met and
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese
Netflix is adding two new documentaries to its crowded 2017 roster: “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.” and “Voyeur,” both of which will premiere at the 55th New York Film Festival and launch globally on Netflix later this year.

Read More:Documentary, Now: Three Rock Stars Who Run The Fast-Changing Nonfiction World

Author Joan Didion’s nephew, actor-director-producer Griffin Dunne, has been laboring on this portrait of his aunt for years. The film spans more than 50 years of essays, novels, screenplays, and criticism, as Didion chronicled America’s cultural and political tides, from the literati scene of New York in the 1950s and early ’60s to her home state of California, where she wrote “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” and such film scripts as “The Panic in Needle Park.”

Dunne unearths a trove of archival footage and interviews his aunt at length about the many people she met and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Netflix to Premiere New Joan Didion Doc at New York Film Festival

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold

“How does one capture such a celebrated and prolific author while delivering something new for audiences to engage with?” That is precisely the question Netflix aims to tackle with its newly announced documentary on the legendary Joan Didion.

For over 50 years, Didion’s work has extended over various literary mediums. Her credits include that of essayist, screenwriter, and novelist. She has been, as Netflix’s press release stresses, “our premier chronicler of the ebb and flow of America’s cultural and political tides with observations on her personal — and our own — upheavals, downturns, life changes, and states of mind.”

This documentary, directed by Griffin Dunne (“I Love Dick”) aims to capture a new level of intimacy and understanding through one-on-one conversations. Dunne and Didion touch on everything from “partying with Janis Joplin in a house full of La rockers” to “the sleek literati scene of the 1950s and early ‘60s” to “her film scripts, including ‘The Panic in Needle Park.’” Dunne emphasizes that this documentary is a “true labor of love.”

Alongside Dunne, the film’s producers include Mary Recine (“What Happened, Miss Simone?”) and Annabelle Dunne (“Everything is Copy”).

Joan Didion’s essay “Goodbye to All That” was optioned for a film adaptation in 2015. Her books include “Slouching Towards Bethlehem,” “The White Album,” and “The Year of Magical Thinking.” Didion also wrote the screenplay for the Barbra Streisand-led “A Star Is Born” and “Up Close and Personal” starring Michelle Pfeiffer

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold” will premiere at this year’s New York Film Festival and on Netflix October 27.

Netflix to Premiere New Joan Didion Doc at New York Film Festival was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 70s —The Lesser Known Films

Two weeks ago I wrote about Film Forum’s retrospective of New York in the 70s and collected all the Polish posters I could find for the best known films in the series. This week I want to concentrate on the films which are less well known and whose one sheets are maybe less iconic yet no less interesting. The 70s was a great period in American movie poster design. The illustrative style of classic Hollywood was out and instead a new reliance on photographs and, especially, type. The one thing that strikes me about the posters below is how heavily they rely on explanatory text and taglines (“Watch the landlord get his”...“Their story is written on his arm”...“If you steal $100,000 from the mob, it’s not robbery. It’s suicide”...“The tush scene alone is worth the price of admission”). The only two posters here that feature
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 1970s in Polish Posters

Above: Polish poster for Escape from New York (John Carpenter, USA, 1981). Designer: Wieslaw Walkuski.For three weeks in July, New York’s Film Forum is running a stellar series of more than 40 1970s New York-set films. As soon as I heard about the program I wanted to do a poster article on it, given that the 1970s was a heyday for American poster design. However, when I started to look at the posters I realized that many of them were so well known that rehashing their posters wasn’t that interesting. But in my search I started to notice how many of the films had Polish counterparts. It is interesting that so many of these American productions were released in Poland and it may have had a lot to do with the counter-cultural, anti-establishment bent of most of the films.While poster design in the U.S. had moved quite decisively from illustration to photography-based in the late 60s, Polish poster art was still mostly drawn and painted in the 1970s. There are a couple of exceptions here but the photos are collaged or posterized in a way that is quite different from the way they would be used in the U.S. Another interesting note is that very few of the posters make use of New York signifiers, with the obvious exception of the Statue of Liberty for Escape from New York, and a silhouetted skyline for Manhattan (notably the two films with the most New York-specific titles). Otherwise the posters seen here are typically idiosyncratic, eccentric, beautiful, alluring, occasionally baffling and, with the possible exception of Serpico, always strikingly unlike their American counterparts. This selection also feels like a tour of great Polish poster art in the 70s, with most of the major artists represented: Jakub Erol, Wiktor Gorka, Eryk Lipinski, Andrzej Klimowski, Jan Mlodozeniec, Andrzej Pagowski, Waldemar Swierzy, Wieslaw Walkuski and more. It seems as if every major designer got a crack at at least one of these challenging, thrilling films.Above: Polish poster for Manhattan (Woody Allen, USA, 1979). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, USA, 1976). Designer: Wiktor Gorka.Above: Polish poster for All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, USA, 1979). Designer: Leszek Drzewinski.Above: Polish poster for Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, USA, 1975). Designer: J. Czerniawski.Above: Polish poster for The Hospital (Arthur Hiller, USA, 1971). Designer: Marcin Mroszczak.Above: Polish poster for Diary of a Mad Housewife (Frank Perry, USA, 1970). Designer: Eryk Lipinski.Above: Polish poster for Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, USA, 1976). Designer: Andrzej Klimowski.Above: Polish poster for Klute (Alan J. Pakula, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.Above: Polish poster for Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, USA, 1977). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for The French Connection (William Friedkin, USA, 1971). Designer: Andrzej Krajewski.Above: Polish poster for Serpico (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1973). Designer: Jakub Erol.Above: Polish poster for The Panic in Needle Park (Jerry Schatzberg, USA, 1971). Designer: Tomas Ruminski.Above: Polish poster for Midnight Cowboy (John Schlesinger, USA, 1969). Designer: Waldemar Swierzy.Above: Polish poster for The Anderson Tapes (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.See New York in the 70s at Film Forum from July 5 to 27.Posters courtesy of Heritage Auctions.
See full article at MUBI »

‘The Deuce’: 10 Things We Learned From Split Screens Festival Screening

‘The Deuce’: 10 Things We Learned From Split Screens Festival Screening
The Deuce,” the HBO drama from “The Wire” and “Treme” vets George Pelecanos and David Simon, transports viewers back to Times Square in all its grungy, seedy, early 1970s glory.

The show toplined by Maggie Gyllenhaal and James Franco revolves around a colorful clutch of hookers, pimps, bartenders, cops and sundry hustlers trying to make a living on the trash-ridden streets of New York. “Deuce” ultimately explores the growth of the modern pornography industry (although the first episode does not delve into the X-rated film biz). The premiere screening of “Deuce’s” pilot was the kickoff event for the Split Screens Festival, which runs through June 8 at IFC Center.

Here are 10 things we learned from the screening and Q&A with Gyllenhaal and director Michelle MacLaren, moderated by festival programming director Matt Zoller Seitz.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Good Time': Film Review | Cannes 2017

'Good Time': Film Review | Cannes 2017
If the Safdie Brothers' last feature, Heaven Knows What, evoked The Panic in Needle Park with its cinema verite observation of the New York City heroin subculture, their impressive follow-up, Good Time, sees them continuing to draw inspiration from the gritty American movies of the 1970s, albeit with their own distinctive street edge. Led by Robert Pattinson giving arguably his most commanding performance to date as a desperate bank robber cut from the same cloth as Al Pacino's Sonny Wortzik in Dog Day Afternoon, this is a richly textured genre piece that packs a visceral charge in its restless widescreen...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Lumiere Festival: Thierry Fremaux on the Festival as a ‘Feast,’ Cinema Influencing Life (Exclusive)

Lumiere Festival: Thierry Fremaux on the Festival as a ‘Feast,’ Cinema Influencing Life (Exclusive)
Lyon, France — Could Lyon’s Lumière Festival – an event dedicated near entirely to classic movies – be shaping up, outside animation, as France’s second biggest film festival? Last year, it ratcheted up 150,000 admissions. In 2016, it has a guest list most festivals would die for: Quentin Tarantino, Nicolas Winding Refn, Park Chan-wook, Gaspar Noe, Walter Hill, Jerry Schatzberg and the French film greats led by Catherine Deneuve, Costa Gavras and Jean-Paul Jeunet and, in industry terms, Nicolas and Jerome Seydoux, heads of Gaumont and Pathe respectively. Not forgetting the Institute Lumière’s Bertrand Tavernier and Thierry Fremaux which run and host the affair. “Host” may be an appropriate word. Fremaux insists the festival should be a ‘feast,’ a fiesta. The Lumière Festival unspools as several hundred live shows, where directors, actors, critics and quite often Bertrand Tavernier – who sometimes seems to remember more about films than the people who made them
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Panic in Needle Park

Drug addicts! Who in 1970 really knew what life was like for them? Jerry Schatzberg, Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne's story of hell on the streets of NYC provided a stunning debut for Al Pacino -- and should have done the same for Kitty Winn. It sounds too tough to watch, but it's riveting. The Panic in Needle Park Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 109 min. / Ship Date June 14, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Al Pacino, Kitty Winn, Alan Vint, Richard Bright, Marcia Jean Kurtz, Raul Julia, Joe Santos, Paul Sorvino Cinematography Adam Holender Film Editor Evan Lottman Original Music Ned Rorem Written by Joan Didion, John Gregory Dunne from the novel by James Mills. Produced by Dominique Dunne, Roger M. Rothstein Directed by Jerry Schatzberg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

We all know how the 1970s upheaval in Hollywood brought new talent to film -- actors,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Off The Shelf – Episode 94 – New Releases for the Week of Tuesday, June 14th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for Tuesday, June 14th, 2016.

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Follow-Up Brian’s tweet about The Thing News Twilight Time – September/October Titles Arrow Video – September titles The Deadly Trackers Blue Sunshine Kino LorberMoving Violations, The Park Is Mine The Transformers: The Movie Scream Factory Sale Raising Cain The Thing Invasion Of The Body Snatchers Links to Amazon Airport: The Complete Collection Black Dog La Chienne Edvard Munch (1974) (Masters of Cinema) Gold Here Comes Mr. Jordan (The Criterion Collection) Jaws 2 Jaws 3 Jaws: The Revenge Nikkatsu Diamond Guys Vol. 2 Star Trek XI Star Trek Into Darkness Too Late for Tears Woman on the Run X-Files: The Event Series The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959) on Blu-ray Inserts (1975) on Blu-ray The Member of The Wedding (1952) on Blu-ray The Panic in Needle Park
See full article at CriterionCast »

How Below-the-Line Workers Brought a Crucial ‘Girls’ Scene to Surreal Life

How Below-the-Line Workers Brought a Crucial ‘Girls’ Scene to Surreal Life
Artisans break down the anatomy of a crucial scene of season five of “Girls.”

Girls” Season 5, Episode 6, “The Panic in Central Park” (HBO)

Inspired by Jerry Schatzberg’s 1971 heroin-junkie drama “The Panic in Needle Park,” Lena Dunham penned a script that helmer Richard Shepard brings to life in a surreal way that precisely conveys the angst and confusion of twentysomething New Yorkers. With her new marriage on the verge of collapse, Marnie (Allison Williams) runs into ex-boyfriend Charlie (Christopher Abbott). They embark on a romantic adventure that, per Shepard, “captures the gritty and the lush, the rich of Fifth Avenue to the grime of Brooklyn.” Shepard highlights five crew members who created this “mini-movie.”

Suk Yi Mar, location manager

“Locations are such a central part of storytelling and this episode was such a New York story. Suk Yi, who has been with ‘Girls’ since the beginning, always brings the best ideas to the table.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Review: Why last night's Marnie spotlight was 'Girls' at its best

  • Hitfix
Review: Why last night's Marnie spotlight was 'Girls' at its best
A few thoughts on last night's Girls coming up just as soon as you pay the $100 gown rental fee... It's funny to think that, when Girls started, Marnie seemed like the normal, relatable member of the group. Some of this was just her physical proximity to Hannah, and how emotionally big and difficult both Jessa and Shoshanna seemed at the time, but she definitely came across as much more sensible than the others at the beginning. And if she wasn't the sanest person on the show, then Charlie was. Jump ahead four years, and where the other Girls — even Hannah — have found some level of maturity and fulfillment, Marnie has turned out to be the most annoying, narcissistic, oblivious member of the quartet, often to great comic effect, but in a way that seemingly rendered her useless as a dramatic character, because who could ever feel sympathy for Marnie? Yet somehow,
See full article at Hitfix »

Joe Santos, ‘The Rockford Files’ Actor, Dies at 84

Joe Santos, ‘The Rockford Files’ Actor, Dies at 84
Joe Santos, known as Lt. Dennis Becker on “The Rockford Files,” died Friday morning at the age of 84, according to multiple reports.

TMZ reports that Santos suffered a heart attack Wednesday at his Los Angeles home, according to his son, Perry Santos. He was put on life support at a hospital in Santa Monica, where he passed away.

The actor played Becker, a frustrated Los Angeles policeman, on the NBC show for eight years, appearing in 112 episodes. Santos received an Emmy nomination for his work in 1979 for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series.

Santos built a career around playing in police-themed shows including “Magnum P.I.” and “Police Story.” Taking a break from being the good policeman everyone loved in “The Rockford Files,” he played a bad guy on “The Sopranos.”

Santos’ big screen appearances included roles in the 1971 film “Panic in Needle Park,” where he starred opposite Al Pacino,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 12

  • MUBI
1961 Spanish poster for Funny Face (Stanley Donen, USA, 1957). Artists: “McP” (Ramon Marti, Joseph Clave, Hernan Pico).Of all the posters I’ve selected for Movie Poster of the Day over the past three months, I would not have expected this Spanish Funny Face to be the most reblogged and “liked” of all, but I am pleasantly surprised that it is. A gorgeous poster, credited to a triumvirate of artists, that repaints photographic images from the Us half-sheet in unexpected shades of purple and orange, it somehow caught Tumblr’s attention. Or maybe it was just those eyes.It tends to be true that the posters that catch fire the most are unusual and striking designs for well known films, like the Japanese Beetlejuice, the Polish Ran, the British Breathless, and the French On the Waterfront. Which makes it all the more heartening that the fourth most popular poster was a
See full article at MUBI »

Trailer For Paul Bettany’s Directorial Debut ‘Shelter’ With Jennifer Connelly and Anthony Mackie

After working with Lars von Trier, Peter Weir, Joss Whedon, Ron Howard and many more directors over the last few decades of his career, Paul Bettany debuted his first directorial effort, from his own script, at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival. Shelter, starring Jennifer Connelly and Anthony Mackie, will now get a release next month and the first trailer has landed. The story follows our leads who fall in love while living homeless on the streets of New York.

While we didn’t get a chance to catch it at Tiff, Variety said, “While Bettany says he was inspired by gritty ’70s New York dramas, Shelter is quite different from the likes of The Panic in Needle Park and the like, which were less catch-all in terms of social issues and more straightforward in presentation. Instead, the tetherless uncertainties of homelessness are evoked to sometimes almost dreamlike effect
See full article at The Film Stage »
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