7.6/10
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A Pattern of Morality 

A successful lawyer defends a hippie accused of murdering a wealthy housewife.

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(teleplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Joan Baldwin
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Dr. Eric Gibson
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District Attorney Dave Blankenship
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Jim McGuire
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Dr. Thomas Hershey
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Murray Gale
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Raymond 'Cowboy' Leatherberry
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Judge Lynn Oliver
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Christine Matchett ...
Melissa Marshall
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Dr. Ray Baldwin
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Gloria (as Kathy Lloyd)
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Baird Marshall
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Norman (as Donald Barry)

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Storyline

A successful lawyer defends a hippie accused of murdering a wealthy housewife.

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

12 September 1971 (USA)  »

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Alternate title: "A Pattern of Morality" See more »

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User Reviews

 
Subsequent series much better than overwrought pilot
23 June 2004 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

It's amazing that Arthur Hill eventually got to make Owen Marshall into an interesting lawyer who shared honestly with the audience how he sometimes needed to wrestle with ethical boundaries. It's amazing the character got to live for four years on network television considering this overwrought and failed attempt at contemporary (circa 1971) relevance. The normally redoubtable Buzz Kulik, normally among the best at taut made-for-TV drama, instead gets extremely overwrought and heavily cliched performances from the entire cast. As a result, Hill's Marshall comes across as unbearably stiff in comparison.

The far-fetched plot makes little sense, and Lee Majors is unbearably wooden as the purported voice of the new generation. If you have fond memories of the TV series and get the opportunity to see this made-for-TV pilot movie, preserve your image and hope that series episodes eventually wend their way to DVD. This hopelessly muddled mess is simply not worth watching.


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