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Wake in Fright (1971) Poster

Trivia

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The movie had been out of circulation for decades because the negative went missing, sparking an international search. After a ten-year quest veteran Australian producer Anthony Buckley finally tracked it down in mid-2004 in a Pittsburgh warehouse, inside a shipping container marked "For Destruction".
Two beer brands are featured in the film: "West End Bitter", a South Australian beer, and "Courage Bitter", an attempt by an English brewer to enter the Australian market (the attempt failed).
The novel's author, Kenneth Cook, based the fictional town of Bundanyabba on Broken Hill in New South Wales, where much of the movie was filmed on location. The train is seen arriving at "Bundanyabba Sulphide St" station, and Sulphide Street is a genuine station in Broken Hill. Broken Hill is one of the most isolated inland towns in Australia.
John Grant's comments about moonlight - "like snow on the desert's dusty face" - is taken from 'The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam', Quatrain 14.
According to the DVD commentary, the "artificial" banknotes printed for shooting the "Two-Up" gambling sequence looked so realistic that two extras were later arrested for trying to pass them off as genuine currency.
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The sudden eerie silence and dimming of the lights in the bar portrays a ritual that still occurs most evenings in Returned & Services League (RSL) clubs across Australia. Each evening the lights are briefly dimmed and patrons are expected to stand in quiet remembrance of fallen service personnel. Usually the ceremony will coincide with the recitation of the 'Ode of Remembrance', a stanza of Laurence Binyon's 'For the Fallen', through the club PA. It reads: "They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them." This is followed by one or two minute's silence, and then the spoken promise by all: "Lest We Forget".
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Charlie mentions Ned Kelly. Ned Kelly is an infamous bushranger/ bandit/ folk hero in Australia and subject of several films - the earliest from 1906 and the most recent from 2003.
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The opera record Doc Tydon plays in his cabin is Amelita Galli-Curci singing "Caro Nome" from Verdi's "Rigoletto."
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There are two drink sizes ordered - a middy (10 fluid oz or 285 ml) and a schooner (15 fluid oz or 425 ml).
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Doc Tydon has a Major Mitchell Cockatoo in the cage at his hut.
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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This was originally going to be the first film for Dirk Bogarde's production company, Bendrose Films, which he set up in 1963. He would also have starred, and Joseph Losey was to direct.
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Film debut of Jack Thompson.
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Final theatrical film of Gary Bond. After this movie, his other projects were mostly TV works.
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This film was released in both Britain and America under the title "Outback", although it has reverted to the original title of Kenneth Cook's novel for its DVD release.
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James Mason and Robert Helpmann were both also considered to play Doc Tydon.
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Michael York turned down the role of John Grant.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

The film features a graphic hunting sequence during which one kangaroo is killed by a hunting dog, many are shot (with several shown wounded but still alive) and one even appears to be deliberately run over. Significant parts of this section were genuine footage of an actual hunt. A production note at the start of the closing credits suggest that these disturbingly confronting images were kept uncut as a deliberate statement against licensed hunting of kangaroos, the survival of which the note claims was at the time 'seriously threatened'.
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