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1-20 of 22 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


‘Los Angeles Plays Itself’ a mastery of visual essay and love letter to cinema’s greatest city

25 September 2013 11:13 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Los Angeles Plays Itself

Written and directed by Thom Andersen

USA, 2003

It comes as no surprise that film sets and locations have been reused throughout the history of the movies. The fact that many of these locations are within or around Los Angeles, a city whose very ontology includes Hollywood and film business, is equally predictable. Yet these locations, distorted to us through the magic of movie production and narrative engagement, hold significant value to the residents of Los Angeles, particularly California Institute of the Arts film instructor Thom Andersen, using what he saw as the denigration of his beloved city on screen to begin a lecture and, ultimately, a film: Los Angeles Plays Itself. “I live here,” he begins his narration through Encke King over a series of establishing shots of the city from various films. “Sometimes I think this gives me the right to criticize the ways movies depict my city. »

- Zach Lewis

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MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood – review

28 August 2013 2:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With its Pigoons and ChickieNobs, does the conclusion of Margaret Atwood's Sf trilogy show her at her best?

The late Iain Banks complained a few years back about "literary" authors doing what their science fiction counterparts call "slipstreaming" – trespassing on their turf. In principle, Banks was all in favour of writers crossing genre boundaries, but he objected when the marauders didn't bother to work out what had "Been Done", and indeed what had "Been Done to the Point of Being a Joke". Imagine, he said, a literary novelist excitedly telling his editor about his brilliant new idea for a book, which is set in an English country house:

"And there's a sort of houseparty going on, you see? And there are all sorts of people there, like a retired colonel and a famous lady clairvoyant, an angry young man and a flighty young thing – isn't this just a fascinating cast of characters? »

- Theo Tait

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Remember Me: Richard Matheson (1926-2013) – “Just” A Great Storyteller

27 June 2013 5:16 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A week after James Gandolfini died, we lost another Jersey boy: novelist, short story writer, film and TV screenwriter Richard Matheson. His was not as well-known a name to the general public as Gandolfini’s, certainly, and perhaps only familiar to sci fi and fantasy fans, the genres within which he scored some of his most memorable successes. When he died, Steven Spielberg, whose early career received a huge boost when he directed the made-for-tv movie Duel (1972) which Matheson adapted from his own short story, said, “For me, he is in the same category as Bradbury and Asimov.”

Personally, I don’t think he stood in that same tier with Bradbury, Asimov, Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein – the real sci fi giants. Nor did he stand in any rung below them. Rather, he stood off to the side.

Clarke grappled with our place in the cosmos, Bradbury used sci fi and »

- Bill Mesce

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Richard Matheson obituary

26 June 2013 2:48 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Science fiction author and inspiration to Stephen King whose novels, such as I Am Legend, were adapted for film and TV

Richard Matheson, the prolific American writer of fantasy, horror and science fiction, much of whose work has been adapted for TV and cinema, has died aged 87. Cited by Stephen King as the biggest influence on his own work, Matheson sent shivers down the spines of readers and viewers for decades, with such unusual novels and stories as The Incredible Shrinking Man and the much-filmed I Am Legend.

He turned his hand to pacy adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe stories for the film director Roger Corman, to the story and screenplay for one of Steven Spielberg's most effective films, Duel (1971), and 16 instalments of the popular and ingenious television series The Twilight Zone. For Matheson, horror was potentially everywhere: battlefields, suburban streets, a cellar, an aircraft cabin – even a library. »

- Christopher Hawtree

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Richard Matheson obituary

26 June 2013 2:48 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Science fiction author and inspiration to Stephen King whose novels, such as I Am Legend, were adapted for film and TV

Richard Matheson, the prolific American writer of fantasy, horror and science fiction, much of whose work has been adapted for TV and cinema, has died aged 87. Cited by Stephen King as the biggest influence on his own work, Matheson sent shivers down the spines of readers and viewers for decades, with such unusual novels and stories as The Incredible Shrinking Man and the much-filmed I Am Legend.

He turned his hand to pacy adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe stories for the film director Roger Corman, to the story and screenplay for one of Steven Spielberg's most effective films, Duel (1971), and 16 instalments of the popular and ingenious television series The Twilight Zone. For Matheson, horror was potentially everywhere: battlefields, suburban streets, a cellar, an aircraft cabin – even a library. »

- Christopher Hawtree

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Airplane Gremlins and Demonic Children: Five Great Works of Television Written by Richard Matheson

25 June 2013 11:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Writer Richard Matheson, who passed away on June 23rd at the age of 87, was a major figure in speculative fiction on the page and on the screen. His 1954 novel "I Am Legend" has been adapted to film three times, as "The Last Man on Earth" (1964), "The Omega Man" (1971)" and "I Am Legend" (2007), while other books and short stories of his provided the inspirations for "What Dreams May Come," "Stir of Echoes," "The Box" and "The Legend of Hell House." He also wrote screenplays, though it's the small screen that may have been the best fit for bringing his writing to life, as he penned famous episodes of "The Twilight Zone" and "Star Trek" as well as an acclaimed early career Steven Spielberg television movie and two more TV features that would lead to the "Night Stalker" series. Here's a look at five highlights from Matheson's work on the small screen. »

- Alison Willmore

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Airplane Gremlins and Demonic Children: Five Great Works of Television Written by Richard Matheson

25 June 2013 11:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Writer Richard Matheson, who passed away on June 23rd at the age of 87, was a major figure in speculative fiction on the page and on the screen. His 1954 novel "I Am Legend" has been adapted to film three times, as "The Last Man on Earth" (1964), "The Omega Man" (1971)" and "I Am Legend" (2007), while other books and short stories of his provided the inspirations for "What Dreams May Come," "Stir of Echoes," "The Box" and "The Legend of Hell House." He also wrote screenplays, though it's the small screen that may have been the best fit for bringing his writing to life, as he penned famous episodes of "The Twilight Zone" and "Star Trek" as well as an acclaimed early career Steven Spielberg television movie and two more TV features that would lead to the "Night Stalker" series. Here's a look at five highlights from Matheson's work on the small screen. »

- Alison Willmore

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Richard Matheson: 1926-2013

24 June 2013 7:51 PM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Renowned science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer Richard Matheson died June 23, 2013 at his home at the age of 87. Matheson is the author of classic Sf novels I Am Legend (1954) and The Shrinking Man (1956), among numerous other books. Many of his iconic works have become abiding parts of popular culture, and many of them have been adapted into comics by Idw Publishing. Adaptations of his works included I Am Legend, adapted by Steve Niles and Elman Brown, Blood Son, adapted by Chris Ryall and Ashley Wood, and Duel by Ryall and Rafa Garres. Matheson’s writing has always been popular for film and TV adaptations, with several of Matheson’s works being adapted, notably film versions of I Am Legend including The Last Man On Earth, The Omega Man, and I Am Legend. The Shrinking Man was filmed as The Incredible Shrinking Man (adapted by Matheson and winner of a Hugo »

- Glenn Hauman

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Richard Matheson, Acclaimed Science Fiction Writer, Dead At Age 87

24 June 2013 6:27 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Richard Matheson, whose classic sci-fi stories were adapted into TV episodes and feature films, has died at age 87. Perhaps his best known novel was I Am Legend, an apocalyptic tale about a man battling hoards of vampires intent on killing him. The film was made into feature films on three occasions, as The Last Man on Earth starring Vincent Price, The Omega Man with Charlton Heston and more recently, I Am Legend with Will Smith. Matheson also wrote dozen teleplays for The Twilight Zone and was working on a remake of his acclaimed 1950s film The Incredible Shrinking Man. For more click here  For Bradley's update click here »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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R.I.P. Richard Matheson [1926-2013]

24 June 2013 4:39 PM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Another of the greats has passed on. Richard Matheson, truly a titan of science fiction and horror, reportedly passed away this past Sunday. He died at the age of 87, and left us with a legacy that will not be forgotten. He was legend, and his characters and worlds will live on forever, long after the last man on Earth.

His career in the literary world and in Hollywood speaks for itself (spanning more than half a century), and includes I Am Legend, What Dreams May Come, The Omega Man, A Stir Of Echoes, The Shrinking Man, and droves more of intelligent and inspiring works of art.

He wrote Duel, Steven Spielberg’s directorial debut. He adapted Edgar Allan Poe’s classics with Roger Corman. He was a staple of the anthology series of the 1960s and 70s, penning the most indelible episodes of The Twilight Zone, Amazing Stories, Rod Serling’S Night Gallery, »

- Andy Greene

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Genre Icon Richard Matheson Passes

24 June 2013 4:29 PM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

A true icon of the genre, the legendary writer Richard Matheson has died.

He was 87 years old.

Mr Matheson is responsible for some of the best writing in the horror field with his most recognized work being I Am Legend which was adapted into three different feature films, all classics in their own way. The Last Man On Earth which starred Vincent Price was the first followed by The Omega Man which starred Charlton … Continue reading → »

- Dave Dreher

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A Legend has Passed On: R.I.P. Richard Matheson

24 June 2013 4:18 PM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

I have just heard that Richard Matheson has passed on. Odds are, you are familiar with his work. He is the author of I Am Legend which spawned the self-titled (abomination) adaptation as well as The Omega Man and the Vincent Price The Last Man on Earth, which he adapted for the screen. Matheson was the writer of a lot of classic Twilight Zone TV episodes – most notably Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.

Richard Matheson passed on yesterday, June 23rd. He was 87. His daughter Ali, wrote the following:

My beloved father passed away yesterday at home surrounded by the people and things he loved…he was funny, brilliant, loving, generous, kind, creative, and the most wonderful father ever…I miss you and love you forever Pop and I know you are now happy and healthy in a beautiful place full of love and joy you always knew was there…

He was going »

- Andy Triefenbach

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R.I.P. Richard Matheson

24 June 2013 4:10 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Update: Influential science fiction and fantasy author Richard Matheson (I Am Legend, The Twilight Zone) died yesterday from natural causes at his home, surrounded by friends and family. He was 87. “For having such a fantastic imagination, he passed very peacefully,” son Richard Matheson Jr. told Deadline. “He was not only a monumental talent, he was also every bit a father, friend, and husband.” Friend and fellow author Harlan Ellison wrote today, “I am downsmashed.” The celebrated writer began his 6-decade-plus career in 1950 with the story “Born Of Man And Woman,” published in The Magazine Of Fantasy And Science Fiction. Matheson’s best-known and oft-adapted works ranged from short stories like “Button, Button” (which Richard Kelly adapted into The Box) to novels including I Am Legend (adapted four times into features The Last Man On Earth, The Omega Man, I Am Omega and I Am Legend). Matheson wrote more than a »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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Richard Matheson Dies

24 June 2013 12:02 PM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

In the class of science fiction’s most influential and original writers, Richard Matheson stands up there with the likes of Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury. So it is with sorrow that we report he has died in California at the age of 87.Though his name might not immediately spark recognition, there is a good chance that if you enjoy the genre, you’ve read his work or seen something adapted from it, including I Am Legend, published in 1954 and filmed as The Last Man On Earth, The Omega Man and the eponymous 2007 Will Smith version; The Shrinking Man, which he adapted into 1957’s The Incredible Shrinking Man; A Stir Of Echoes and several episodes of The Twilight Zone, including the classic Nightmare At 20,000 Feet.He was born in New Jersey in 1926 to Norwegian immigrants and lived with his mother after his father abandoned the family. After serving in World War II, »

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Genre Icon Richard Matheson Passes

21 June 2013 9:39 AM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

A true icon of the genre, the legendary writer Richard Matheson has died.

He was 87 years old.

Mr Matheson is responsible for some of the best writing in the horror field with his most recognized work being I Am Legend which was adapted into three different feature films, all classics in their own way. The Last Man On Earth which starred Vincent Price was the first followed by The Omega Man which starred Charlton … Continue reading → »

- Dave Dreher

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Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1970′s

19 May 2013 4:43 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Recent hot cinema topics such as the portrayal of the Mandarin character in Shane Black’s Iron Man 3 and speculations about what classic Star Trek villain Benedict Cumberbatch’s character in J.J Abrams’ Star Trek: Into Darkness was modeled after leading up to the film’s release, among others, underline the importance of great villains in genre cinema.

Creating a great cinematic villain is a difficult goal that makes for an incredibly rewarding and memorable viewer experience when it is achieved.

We’ll now take a look at the greatest film villains.  Other writing on this subject tends to be a bit unfocused, as “greatest villain” articles tend to mix live-action human villains with animated characters and even animals.  Many of these articles also lack a cohesive quality as they attempt to cover too much ground at once by spanning all of film history.

This article focuses on the 1970’s, »

- Terek Puckett

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Richard Matheson, William Friedkin, and Vince Gilligan to Be Honored at this Year's Saturn Awards

15 May 2013 11:47 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Their creations are towering achievements in genre entertainment, and on June 26 the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films will recognize the continually influential work of Richard Matheson, William Friedkin, and Vince Gilligan at the Saturn Awards.

From the Press Release

This year’s Saturn Awards ceremony will be hosted by actress Virginia Madsen, who won a Saturn Award as Best Actress for her performance in 1992’s Candyman and received an Oscar® nomination for Actress in a Supporting Role for 2004’s Sideways. Matheson, Friedkin, and Gilligan are all expected to attend the Saturn Awards ceremony at the Castaway Starlight Ballroom in Burbank, California.

“The recipients of this year’s special Saturn Awards have influenced generations of fans – not to mention other creative minds – and their accomplishments truly rank among the great contributions to science fiction, fantasy, and horror,” said Academy President Robert Holguin. “They have provoked our thoughts, invaded our dreams, »

- Uncle Creepy

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The 10 great horror films of 1973 that weren't The Exorcist

22 April 2013 2:26 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Top 10 Aliya Whiteley 23 Apr 2013 - 07:43

The Exorcist celebrates its 40th birthday this year, which had Aliya wondering, what other horror films came out in 1973? Here are 10...

Some movies become so famous, so iconic, that they rise above the time and place from which they sprang. The Exorcist is one of those movies. It doesn’t need any explanation and it doesn’t seem to age. Whether you love it or hate it, it stands above other horror movies.

It’s too easy to view influential films as if they were made in a vacuum, but when we talk about The Exorcist as possibly the best horror movie ever made, it got me thinking – was it part of a great year for the horror genre? What else was out there in 1973? Were all the horror movies of that year along similar themes, or were they all still dealing in physical rather than psychological horror? »

- ryanlambie

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Immersed in Movies: 'Oblivion' Director Kosinski Talks Creating Original Sci-Fi Landscape Starring Cruise

19 April 2013 11:25 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

With a looming summer season packed with post-apocalyptic sci-fi--from "After Earth" (May 31) and "World War Z" (June 21) to "Elysium" (August 9) -- it's a good thing that director Joseph Kosinski's "Oblivion" is first out of the gate. This Tom Cruise-starrer about a blue collar drone repairman haunted by dreams of a woman he's never met stands apart from the competition, mainly because architect and video game designer Kosinski's follow-up to "Tron: Legacy" is a passion project he's been developing for eight years that allows him to strut his visual stuff. The philosophical "Oblivion" mines the depths of the genre with elements of thriller, mystery, action, and romance, wrapped around a prevailing sense of melancholy countered by a brighter watercolor design aesthetic that recalls the works of illustrators Chris Foss and Peter Elson. While "Oblivion" also can't escape riffing on such sci-fi faves as "La Jetee," "Planet of the Apes, »

- Bill Desowitz

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Mad Max's Weekend Movie Guide: 'Oblivion' & More

19 April 2013 7:00 AM, PDT | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

"I'll see you in another life when we are both cats." –Tom Cruise, 'Vanilla Sky'

Greetings from the apocalypse! You might think that this particular Mad Max would enjoy watching Tom Cruise fight evil robots in a future nuclear-blasted wasteland, but Nope! "Oblivion" is a dud, though that doesn't mean we can't make it through the next few days as long as we stick together and don't cross the Dmz. Smoke 'em if ya got 'em, troops, we're goin' in …

Friday, April 19

Pow! In Theaters

Xenu's own Tom Cruise returns to comfortable sci-fi territory this week with "Oblivion," which I will henceforth refer to as "The Matrix Redressed." Cruise is the only living boy in post-apocalyptic New York, where he and a stuffy British chick (Andrea Riseborough, natch) maintain giant water vacuums when they're not having PG-13 swimming pool sex … that is, until the mysterious Olga Kurylenko arrives from outer space. »

- Max Evry

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