7.8/10
2,061
85 user 9 critic

Melody (1971)

Two youngsters declare to their parents that they want to get married. Not sometime in the future but as soon as possible. The story is told from the children's point of view.

Director:

Writer:

(original story and screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Tracy Hyde ...
...
Ornshaw
Colin Barrie ...
Chambers
Billy Franks ...
Burgess
Ashley Knight ...
Stacey
Craig Marriott ...
Dadds
William Vanderpuye ...
O'Leary
Peter Walton ...
Fensham
Camille Davis ...
Muriel
Dawn Hope ...
Maureen
Kay Skinner ...
Peggy
Lesley Roach ...
Rhoda
...
Mrs Latimer
Kate Williams ...
Mrs Perkins
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Storyline

Two youngsters declare to their parents that they want to get married. Not sometime in the future but as soon as possible. The story is told from the children's point of view. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A tender love story for everyone who was ever twelve years old. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 April 1971 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

S.W.A.L.K.  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor) (Portugal)| (Colour by) (Eastman Colour)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The producers spent several months looking for a young actress to play the title role before casting Tracy Hyde. See more »

Goofs

Daniel's cello playing bears no relation to the soundtrack at c.45 minutes. See more »

Quotes

Maureen: Do you kiss boys, Muriel?
Muriel: Sometimes, if I like him enough.
Melody: Aren't you frightened?
Muriel: Oh, why should I be frightened? It's quite nice when you get used to it.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Film closes with: Love Melody xx x See more »

Connections

Referenced in Moonrise Kingdom (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Spicks and Specks
Written by Barry Gibb
Performed by Richard Hewson Orchestra with Children from Corona School
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Two requirements for loving this film...
3 October 2000 | by (Phoenix, AZ, USA) – See all my reviews

...You must have once been in love, and you must have once been a child.

I hadn't realized anyone else had seen this film, nor that it had such a similar impact on everybody. I first saw this film when I was a child growing up in Las Vegas, Nevada. It would play on the afternoon "Movie with Gus", some local show that picked up movies in syndication. I may have been 10 or 12 years old. I loved it immediately. I could identify with the pain of both lovers, and the friend. It's such a universal story that it rises above the cultural, class, and period distinctions.

I remember staying up to watch the movie again at 1:00 AM. Then when it was repeated on the weekend. From that point on, I made it a weekly ritual to scan through the television guide to see if Melody was on that week. In those days they must have had a pretty set schedule of syndication because, you could count on the film making the rounds again. But with the rise of cable television and video, the movie vanished from the schedule. (Now you have a hundred channels offering identical content on different timetables.)

Years later I found the film on VHS (literally jumped up and down in the store) and proceeded to rent it repeatedly to show to my friends. Everyone who saw it, even as adults, loved it. I found the soundtrack a few years back as a Japanese import. I've searched for the VHS copy everywhere since. There must have been thousands of VHS copies at one time, which have probably all been dumped. I consider myself a cinephile, but with this I'd accept a tenth-generation copy just to have it again. The beauty of this film is in it's performances.

Alan Parker, who co-wrote Melody, revisited the themes again in his later films, which always seem to include a sub-theme of unrequited love. I wonder to this day if Alan Parker has any fondness for this film, or if he sees it as something of a freshman work.


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