They Call Me Trinity (1970) - News Poster

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Mario Bava’s Roy Colt And Winchester Jack – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

It is arguable exactly when the first so-called spaghetti western was filmed (some critics go all the way back to 1943), but there isn’t much argument about when the genre was popularized, and that was with Sergio Leone’s A Fistful of Dollars, released in 1964 and quickly followed by even more commercial success with 1965’s For a Few Dollars More. Of all the Italian film genres, spaghetti westerns may have been the most popular worldwide, and literally hundreds were produced, spawning subgenres like Zapatas (political films that criticized imperialism), gunslingers (featuring bounty hunters), betrayal stories, tragic heroes, and even comedy westerns.

The height of the spaghetti western craze was 1968, with 1969 seeing a marked decrease in these types of films being produced. Even though the cycle lasted well into the 1970’s—and some of the best of the genre were produced during that time—the genre was
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Quentin Tarantino Reveals Project Concerning the Cinema of 1970

Quentin Tarantino‘s brand of fetishism — the non-foot kind, I mean — is, in some part, an exploration of the cinema on a genre-by-genre basis, and so his filmography has, to my mind, been missing a certain something without a documentary. While he’ll claim there are (maybe) only two features left in him, there’s a chance that one will take that path — or at least have a documentary-like reserve of research behind it.

The subject? 1970. No, not the cinema of the 1970s, a medium-specific topic that’s been covered as much as any, but 1970, a time Quentin Tarantino considers the takeover point for New Hollywood — and it’s fascinated him so much that he’s been poring over and pondering material for four years. So he revealed during a recent masterclass held at Lyon’s Lumière Festival, where the “work in progress” was given this noncommital classification: “Am I going to write a book?
See full article at The Film Stage »

Bud Spencer, Iconic Italian Film Star, Dead At Age 86

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Bud Spencer, the burly former Italian athlete who became an iconic film star in his native country, has died at age 86. Spencer, whose real name was Carlo Pedersoli, chose his stage name as a tribute to Budweiser beer, which he loved, and Spencer Tracy, his favorite film star. Although Spencer's film found some exposure in the American market, his greatest success was found in European comedy westerns that often co-starred his friend Terence Hill. Among the films that are best known to English-speaking audiences are "Ace High", "The Five Man Army", "They Call Me Trinity", "Trinity is Still My Name!", "Four Flies on Grey Velvet" and "A Reason to Live, A Reason to Die". Among the contemporary actors Spencer counted among his admirers was Russell Crowe. For more click here.  
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Bud Spencer, Italian Spaghetti Westerns Star, Dies at 86

Bud Spencer, Italian Spaghetti Westerns Star, Dies at 86
Rome — Bud Spencer, the burly Italian actor who starred in dozens of genre movies including many widely exported Spaghetti Westerns such as “Trinity is Still My Name,” which is among Italy’s all-time top grossing titles, has died. He was 86.

Spencer, whose real name was Carlo Pedersoli, passed away “peacefully” in Rome on Monday, his son Giuseppe Pedersoli said in a media statement that did not disclose the exact cause of death.

In the late 1960s, just as his acting career was starting to take off, Carlo Pedersoli changed his name to Bud Spencer as an homage to Budweiser beer and Spencer Tracy. He also reportedly thought it was ironic to call himself Bud despite his Herculean physique, which made him known to his fans as “the big friendly giant” of the screen.

Born in Naples in 1929, Spencer first gained a measure of fame as an athlete, becoming the first
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: "My Name Is Nobody" (1973) Starring Terence Hill And Henry Fonda; Blu-ray Release From Image

  • CinemaRetro
By John Lemay

My Name is Nobody is many things: a 1973 spoof of the “young and old gunslingers” sub-genre that began with For a Few Dollars More; Henry Fonda’s last Western (and Sergio Leone’s to an extent); and even a eulogy on the dying of the Spaghetti Western itself. Spearheaded by Sergio Leone himself, Nobody was directed by Tonino Valerii (Day of Anger) and teams Once Upon a Time in the West’s Henry Fonda with They Call Me Trinity’s Terence Hill. As a combo of Leone’s straight westerns and Hill’s “Beans Westerns” (a slang term for comedic Spaghettis) it amounts to quite the crossover film and could’ve easily been called “Once Upon A Time in the West They Called Me Trinity.” While it is never as funny as Hill’s two Trinity films or as epic as Leone’s “horse operas” it is
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Farley Granger obituary

Actor who rose to fame in Hitchcock's Rope and Strangers On a Train, but refused to conform to Hollywood pressures

Early on in his career, the actor Farley Granger, who has died aged 85, worked with several of the world's greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock on Rope (1948) and Strangers On a Train (1951), Nicholas Ray on They Live By Night (1949) and Luchino Visconti on Senso (1953). Yet Granger failed to sustain the momentum of those years, meandering into television, some stage work and often indifferent European and American movies.

The reasons were complicated, owing much to his sexuality and an unwillingness to conform to Hollywood pressures, notably from his contract studio, MGM, and Samuel Goldwyn. Granger refused to play the publicity or marrying game common among gay and bisexual stars and turned down roles he considered unsuitable, earning a reputation – in his own words – for being "a naughty boy".

He was also the victim of bad luck,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Farley Granger obituary

Actor who rose to fame in Hitchcock's Rope and Strangers On a Train, but refused to conform to Hollywood pressures

Early on in his career, the actor Farley Granger, who has died aged 85, worked with several of the world's greatest directors, including Alfred Hitchcock on Rope (1948) and Strangers On a Train (1951), Nicholas Ray on They Live By Night (1949) and Luchino Visconti on Senso (1953). Yet Granger failed to sustain the momentum of those years, meandering into television, some stage work and often indifferent European and American movies.

The reasons were complicated, owing much to his sexuality and an unwillingness to conform to Hollywood pressures, notably from his contract studio, MGM, and Samuel Goldwyn. Granger refused to play the publicity or marrying game common among gay and bisexual stars and turned down roles he considered unsuitable, earning a reputation – in his own words – for being "a naughty boy".

He was also the victim of bad luck,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Farley Granger: Resented Gay Label But "Lived the Greater Part of My Life with a Man"

Alida Valli, Farley Granger in Luchino Visconti's Senso Farley Granger Dies: Rope, Senso, Strangers On A Train A lengthy big-screen hiatus followed, as Farley Granger's on-camera appearances became restricted to television work. He eventually returned to features in the late '60s, almost invariably in European productions. During that time, he was featured in several Euro-Westerns and horror/gialli (mix of violence and sex) productions. Among the Westerns were My Name Is Trinity (1970) and The Man Called Noon (1973); Granger's gialli and horror flicks included Something Is Crawling in the Dark (1971), Amuck (1972), The Red Headed Corpse (1972), and So Sweet, So Dead (1972). According to the IMDb, Granger's last feature-film role was in P. J. Posner's dramatic comedy The Next Big Thing in 2001. In addition to his film and TV work, Granger also appeared on Broadway in The Glass Menagerie, The Seagull, The Crucible, and Deathtrap. In 1966, he won [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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