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Mad Dogs & Englishmen (1971)

GP  -  Documentary | Music  -  24 July 1971 (Japan)
7.1
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Ratings: 7.1/10 from 153 users  
Reviews: 5 user | 1 critic

This classic concert from Joe Cocker was filmed at the Metropol in Berlin on October 31st 1980 with Cocker in fine voice on a strong set with many of his most famous tracks including "Delta... See full summary »

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Title: Mad Dogs & Englishmen (1971)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself
...
Himself
Chris Stainton ...
Himself
Jim Price ...
Himself (as The Band)
Bobby Keys ...
Himself (as The Band)
Jim Gordon ...
Himself (as The Band)
Jim Keltner ...
Himself (as The Band)
Carl Radle ...
Himself (as The Band)
Don Preston ...
Himself (as The Band) (as The Space Choir)
Sandy Konikoff ...
Himself (as The Band)
Chuck Blackwell ...
Himself (as The Band)
Bobby Torres ...
Himself (as The Band)
Jim Horn ...
Himself (as The Band)
Rita Coolidge ...
Herself (as The Space Choir)
Claudia Lennear ...
Herself (as The Space Choir)
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Storyline

This classic concert from Joe Cocker was filmed at the Metropol in Berlin on October 31st 1980 with Cocker in fine voice on a strong set with many of his most famous tracks including "Delta Lady", "Cry Me A River", "The Letter", "You Are So Beautiful" and his definitive take on the Lennon & McCartney classic "With A Little Help From My Friends". Also included are some rarer tracks including his versions of "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" and "I Heard It Through The Grapevine". Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Documentary | Music

Certificate:

GP | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

24 July 1971 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

Joe Cocker: Mad Dogs & Englishmen  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Joe Cocker found himself in the unusual position of having no band and several concert dates to play when his group Grease Band returned to England ahead of him. He then recruited over 40 of his friends and family to help out, and for the next six weeks, effectively created a touring commune. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Rocks the Movies: The 1970s (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

With a Little Help from My Friends
Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
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User Reviews

 
Rollicking time capsule
30 July 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

JOE COCKER: MAD DOGS AND ENGLISHMEN (1971) Few films capture the grimy, jazzy feel of what it was like to be in a rock and roll band than this documentary gem. One particularly revealing scene shows what a recording session was like: ten people crammed in a smoke-filled room playing loudly and in one take. No over dubbing or fancy equipment. Just some men and women (or, as the final song shows, hermaphrodites) with passion and raw musical talent. The famous performance of "The Letter" with Joe Cocker in a lei is the one you hear on the radio today. The Mad Dogs, headed by Cocker and Leon Russell, rework several well-known songs to fit their own groovy, down and dirty style. "With a Little Help from My Friends" becomes a choir backed extravaganza, while The Box Tops' "The Letter" is fashioned into a R/B piece with an immortal horns riff; You know the "da da da dadada" when you hear it. The technical aspects are solid as well, with split screens, frame coloration, and the like. The film doesn't tell you in voice over what the road was like, it shows you. In a camp out scene, Joe can be seen looking at his contemporaries embracing while he sits off-kilter by himself. It's always suggesting, never telling. I saw this with my grandpa and he had lots to say about what he remembered about those days. He enjoyed it thoroughly and I was surprised how much I did as well; more so than even "Woodstock". "Woodstock" was too sprawling, too colossal to love. This one is a brief, piercing look at a band that wasn't necessarily the best, but had a hell of a time trying to be.


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