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Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 1970s in Polish Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Polish poster for Escape from New York (John Carpenter, USA, 1981). Designer: Wieslaw Walkuski.For three weeks in July, New York’s Film Forum is running a stellar series of more than 40 1970s New York-set films. As soon as I heard about the program I wanted to do a poster article on it, given that the 1970s was a heyday for American poster design. However, when I started to look at the posters I realized that many of them were so well known that rehashing their posters wasn’t that interesting. But in my search I started to notice how many of the films had Polish counterparts. It is interesting that so many of these American productions were released in Poland and it may have had a lot to do with the counter-cultural, anti-establishment bent of most of the films.While poster design in the U.S. had moved quite decisively from illustration to photography-based in the late 60s, Polish poster art was still mostly drawn and painted in the 1970s. There are a couple of exceptions here but the photos are collaged or posterized in a way that is quite different from the way they would be used in the U.S. Another interesting note is that very few of the posters make use of New York signifiers, with the obvious exception of the Statue of Liberty for Escape from New York, and a silhouetted skyline for Manhattan (notably the two films with the most New York-specific titles). Otherwise the posters seen here are typically idiosyncratic, eccentric, beautiful, alluring, occasionally baffling and, with the possible exception of Serpico, always strikingly unlike their American counterparts. This selection also feels like a tour of great Polish poster art in the 70s, with most of the major artists represented: Jakub Erol, Wiktor Gorka, Eryk Lipinski, Andrzej Klimowski, Jan Mlodozeniec, Andrzej Pagowski, Waldemar Swierzy, Wieslaw Walkuski and more. It seems as if every major designer got a crack at at least one of these challenging, thrilling films.Above: Polish poster for Manhattan (Woody Allen, USA, 1979). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, USA, 1976). Designer: Wiktor Gorka.Above: Polish poster for All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, USA, 1979). Designer: Leszek Drzewinski.Above: Polish poster for Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, USA, 1975). Designer: J. Czerniawski.Above: Polish poster for The Hospital (Arthur Hiller, USA, 1971). Designer: Marcin Mroszczak.Above: Polish poster for Diary of a Mad Housewife (Frank Perry, USA, 1970). Designer: Eryk Lipinski.Above: Polish poster for Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, USA, 1976). Designer: Andrzej Klimowski.Above: Polish poster for Klute (Alan J. Pakula, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.Above: Polish poster for Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, USA, 1977). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for The French Connection (William Friedkin, USA, 1971). Designer: Andrzej Krajewski.Above: Polish poster for Serpico (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1973). Designer: Jakub Erol.Above: Polish poster for The Panic in Needle Park (Jerry Schatzberg, USA, 1971). Designer: Tomas Ruminski.Above: Polish poster for Midnight Cowboy (John Schlesinger, USA, 1969). Designer: Waldemar Swierzy.Above: Polish poster for The Anderson Tapes (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.See New York in the 70s at Film Forum from July 5 to 27.Posters courtesy of Heritage Auctions.
See full article at MUBI »

Arthur Hiller obituary

Director of Love Story whose Hollywood career spanned 50 years

Arthur Hiller, who has died aged 92, was regarded as a journeyman director, but when a brilliant screenplay, such as Paddy Chayevsky’s The Hospital (1971), came his way, he created a scabrous black comedy. Similarly, when Neil Simon provided him with a witty, original script for The Out of Towners (1970), Hiller once again did it justice. These films and a dozen others stayed in the mind long after his biggest hit, the romantic drama Love Story (1970), had been subsumed into the category of guilty pleasures.

Love Story, a weepy based on the bestselling novel by Erich Segal and starring Ryan O’Neal and Ali MacGraw as lovers struggling to overcome their families’ objections to their union, was the most popular film of its year, with its much-repeated catchphrase: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” It was nominated for seven Oscars,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Arthur Hiller obituary

Director of Love Story whose Hollywood career spanned 50 years

Arthur Hiller, who has died aged 92, was regarded as a journeyman director, but when a brilliant screenplay, such as Paddy Chayevsky’s The Hospital (1971), came his way, he created a scabrous black comedy. Similarly, when Neil Simon provided him with a witty, original script for The Out of Towners (1970), Hiller once again did it justice. These films and a dozen others stayed in the mind long after his biggest hit, the romantic drama Love Story (1970), had been subsumed into the category of guilty pleasures.

Love Story, a weepy based on the bestselling novel by Erich Segal and starring Ryan O’Neal and Ali MacGraw as lovers struggling to overcome their families’ objections to their union, was the most popular film of its year, with its much-repeated catchphrase: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” It was nominated for seven Oscars,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Daily | Arthur Hiller, 1923 – 2016

  • Keyframe
"Arthur Hiller, an Academy Award-nominated director whose long career began in live television and flourished in the movies in the 1970s with crowd-pleasers like the phenomenally successful Love Story, died on Wednesday in Los Angeles," writes Dave Kehr for the New York Times. As Patrick Hipes notes at Deadline, Love Story would lead "to a streak of big movies for Hiller that spanned especially comedy including The Hospital, penned by Paddy Chayefsky (who also wrote The Americanization of Emily); Silver Streak with Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor; The In-Laws with Peter Falk and Alan Arkin; The Lonely Guy with Steve Martin; and Outrageous Fortune starring Shelley Long and Bette Midler. He also helmed the film adaptations of Neil Simon’s The Out of Towners and Plaza Suite." We're collecting remembrances. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Director Arthur Hiller, whose 'In-Laws' was a perfect comedy, dies at 92

  • Hitfix
Director Arthur Hiller, whose 'In-Laws' was a perfect comedy, dies at 92
Arthur Hiller was never the coolest filmmaker in the room. He leaves behind a list of films that were genuinely loved by audiences and an ocean of collaborators and friends who speak of him in glowing terms, and honestly, as a storyteller, what more could anyone ask? There’s certainly some cachet in the idea that you’re breaking new ground stylistically or you’re doing things that other people are ripping off or you’re part of some formal movement of deconstructionists. I like plenty of filmmakers who chase cool like it is oxygen, necessary for their entire existence. Arthur Hiller, though, was a meat and potatoes kind of guy, and he made movies that spoke to his optimistic view of who we could be as people, shot through with just a hint of cynicism at times. My personal favorite of his movies is The In-Laws, which I just rewatched a few weeks ago.
See full article at Hitfix »

Arthur Hiller, 'Love Story' Director, Dead at 92

Arthur Hiller, 'Love Story' Director, Dead at 92
Arthur Hiller, the director of Love Story, The Out-of-Towners, The In-Laws, The Hospital, among others, died Wednesday of natural causes, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced. Hiller, who served as the Academy president between 1993 and 1997, was 92.

Hiller is best known for directing 1970's Love Story, the Oscar-nominated drama starring Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal. Filmed on a shoestring budget of $2 million, the film went on to gross over $106 million, or $659 million in today's adjusted box office. As The Hollywood Reporter notes, the success of Love Story, considered one of cinema's greatest tearjerkers,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92
Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller, who spent more than a decade mostly working in television before a career in feature helming that included “Love Story,” “The Americanization of Emily” and comedy “Silver Streak,” died Wednesday. He was 92.

Love Story,” based on the bestseller by Erich Segal, was an enormous box office hit in 1970 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Though many critics dismissed the movie as too sentimental, it is No. 9 on the AFI’s list of the most romantic films of all time.

Hiller served as president of the Directors Guild of America from 1989-93 and of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences from 1993-97. He received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Academy Awards ceremony.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences issued a statement. “We are deeply saddened by the passing of our beloved friend Arthur Hiller,” said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs. “I
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92

Arthur Hiller, Director of ‘Love Story,’ Dies at 92
Canadian-born director Arthur Hiller, who spent more than a decade mostly working in television before a career in feature helming that included “Love Story,” “The Americanization of Emily” and comedy “Silver Streak,” died Wednesday. He was 92.

Love Story,” based on the bestseller by Erich Segal, was an enormous box office hit in 1970 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including best picture. Though many critics dismissed the movie as too sentimental, it is No. 9 on the AFI’s list of the most romantic films of all time.

Hiller served as president of the Directors Guild of America from 1989-93 and of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences from 1993-97. He received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the 2002 Academy Awards ceremony.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences issued a statement. “We are deeply saddened by the passing of our beloved friend Arthur Hiller,” said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory's 45th Anniversary: Why Gene Wilder Was Robbed of an Oscar

  • PEOPLE.com
Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory's 45th Anniversary: Why Gene Wilder Was Robbed of an Oscar
Thursday is the 45th anniversary of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, and nearly a half-century later, a specter is haunting pop culture. Gene Wilder deserved an Oscar for this film. Wilder is one of the greatest comic actors of the 20th century, but his turn as Wonka is one of the most finely-tuned feature-length performances from any actor, ever. Wilder's performance in Chocolate Factory careens wildly in tone, veering from charming-if-slightly-off in his first few scenes to downright unhinged and terrifying in the infamous tunnel scene a few scant minutes later. Wilder's Wonka was by design unpredictable, but meticulously planned out by the actor.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory's 45th Anniversary: Why Gene Wilder Was Robbed of an Oscar

  • PEOPLE.com
Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory's 45th Anniversary: Why Gene Wilder Was Robbed of an Oscar
Thursday is the 45th anniversary of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, and nearly a half-century later, a specter is haunting pop culture. Gene Wilder deserved an Oscar for this film. Wilder is one of the greatest comic actors of the 20th century, but his turn as Wonka is one of the most finely-tuned feature-length performances from any actor, ever. Wilder's performance in Chocolate Factory careens wildly in tone, veering from charming-if-slightly-off in his first few scenes to downright unhinged and terrifying in the infamous tunnel scene a few scant minutes later. Wilder's Wonka was by design unpredictable, but meticulously planned out by the actor.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Interview: “Mean Girls” Director Mark Waters On Its 10th Anniversary And His New Film “Vampire Academy”

  • The Backlot
When director Mark Waters gave us the high school satire Mean Girls in 2004, he probably didn’t expect that nearly every line of dialogue in Tina Fey‘s script would be immortalized in GIFs, memes, and everyday conversation for the next decade. Where does one start when choosing the ever-fetch Lindsay Lohan film’s finest attribute? Could it be “queen bee” Regina George’s (Rachel McAdams) fearsome reign over the popular Plastics clique? What about impish outsider Janis (Lizzy Caplan) and her best friend Damian (Daniel Franzese), a polo-wearing cynic who is deemed “too gay to function”? What of Amy Poehler‘s turn as a vapid, fabulously tracksuited “cool mom”? Or the shrill, worried bleat of Gretchen Wieners (Lacey Chabert)? All are acceptable answers.

Now, Waters — who also helmed The Spiderwick Chronicles, Mr. Popper’s Penguins, and the Lohan-starred remake of Freaky Friday – is pairing up with another cutting writer
See full article at The Backlot »

Jamie Lee Curtis Raced To The Hospital After Car Accident

The actress and Activia spokesperson was involved in a car accident on Aug. 1 and taken to the hospital. Her good friend, actress Jodi Foster, raced to meet her at the scene.

Actress Jamie Lee Curtis, 54, and mother-of two, was the passenger in a black SUV that collided with a BMW on Aug. 1 in Venice Beach, Calif. TMZ is reporting that Jamie was taken to the hospital moments after the crash.

Jamie Lee Curtis Raced To The Hospital After Car Accident

The award-winning actress was treated at the hospital for some “minor injuries” and has since been allowed to recover at home. Jamie reportedly called her good friend Jodi Foster to come and meet her at the scene. The report claims that Jamie was seen talking to authorities and she looked pretty “shaken up.” One unnamed person was taken to the hospital and their injuries are said to be much more serious.
See full article at HollywoodLife »

Lead Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated

  • SoundOnSight
This article is dedicated to Andrew Copp: filmmaker, film writer, artist and close friend who passed away on January 19, 2013. You are loved and missed, brother.

****

Looking at the Best Actor Academy Award nominations for the film year 2012, the one miss that clearly cries out for more attention is Liam Neeson’s powerful performance in Joe Carnahan’s excellent survival film The Grey, easily one of the best roles of Neeson’s career.

In Neeson’s case, his lack of a nomination was a case of neglect similar to the Albert Brooks snub in the Best Supporting Actor category for the film year 2011 for Drive(Nicolas Winding Refn, USA).

Along with negligence, other factors commonly prevent outstanding lead acting performances from getting the kind of critical attention they deserve. Sometimes it’s that the performance is in a film not considered “Oscar material” or even worthy of any substantial critical attention.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg

  • TVLine.com
Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg
Doctor Who will hang with one very groovy lady when Dame Diana Rigg aka The Avengers‘ Emma Peel guest-stars on the BBC series next season.

And joining Rigg for her trip with the Time Lord will be her real-life daughter, Rachael Stirling, the BBC reports.

Related | Doctor Who Casts New Companion: Find Out When She’ll Arrive

In an episode filming this week with series star Matt Smith and new companion Jenna-Louise Coleman, Rigg and Stirling will play a Yorkshire local and her daughter, who together share a “dark secret.”

“The first time Rachie and I will be working together
See full article at TVLine.com »

Rest in Peace: Roberts Blossom

His name may not ring a bell at first, but chances are you're quite familiar with the work of character actor Roberts Blossom. Sadly, Mr. Blossom passed away last Friday in Santa Monica, California, at the age of 87.

The New York Times posted quite a nice tribute to the quirky actor, excerpts of which follow:

Roberts Blossom was known for playing cantankerous old coots, both comic and sinister, but may be best remembered as the kindly next-door neighbor in the comedy Home Alone. He was an ill-fated patient in the George C. Scott film The Hospital, the delirious Wild Bob Cody in Slaughterhouse-Five, Paul Le Mat’s ornery father in Citizens Band, the farmer who once saw Bigfoot in Close Encounters of the Third Kind, the convict who paints the warden’s portrait in Escape From Alcatraz, and the irate judge who sentences Michael J. Fox to community service in
See full article at Dread Central »

Remember Me: Sidney Lumet (1924-2011)

One of the true giants passed away this week: filmmaker Sidney Lumet, dead at 86 of lymphoma.

He was one of an incredibly talented class of directors who graduated from the early days of TV; a group which included such august talents as Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde, 1967), George Roy Hill (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969), John Frankenheimer (The Manchurian Candidate, 1962), Arthur Hiller (The Hospital, 1971), Franklin J. Schaffner (Patton, 1970), Norman Jewison (In the Heat of the Night, 1967), Robert Mulligan (To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962), Martin Ritt (Hud, 1963), and Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch, 1969). Only Jewison is left, now, and as each has passed, mainstream American moviemaking has gotten a little louder, a little emptier, and a little dumber.

TV drama in the early days was almost like good theater: it was usually live, smart, provocative, rich with real-world character and sharp dialogue. Very early on, Lumet was considered one of the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Veteran Sound Mixer Dennis Maitland Dies: The Prince Of Tides, Mars Attacks!, Moonstruck

Tod Maitland, Dennis Maitland, Norman Jewison at the 45th Cinema Audio Society Awards Production Sound Mixer Dennis L. Maitland, who collaborated with the likes of John Cassavetes, Barbra Streisand, Sydney Pollack, Paul Mazursky, Norman Jewison, Herbert Ross, Paul Newman, John Huston, Tim Burton, Bob Fosse, Sidney Lumet, and Arthur Hiller, died in New York City on March 31. Maitland was 79. A veteran of more than 80 feature films and a number of television shows, Maitland was given the Cinema Audio Society’s Career Achievement Award in 2009. Among his feature-film credits are The Prince of Tides, Three Days of the Condor, Husbands, The Hospital, The Pawnbroker, Lenny, Gloria, …And Justice for All, Moonstruck, and Mars Attacks!. Additionally, Maitland also worked as a music mixer for Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, Count Basie, The Beatles, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn, and the philharmonic orchestras of New York, Boston, Berlin, Philadelphia and Montreal. On [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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