The French Connection
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

18 items from 2017


12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘Free Fire’

21 April 2017 11:26 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

We recommend titles that influenced Ben Wheatley and more.

With his sixth feature, Ben Wheatley finally has a wide release in America. Free Fire might be his most accessible movie yet, consisting a single location and pretty much just one long action sequence. It’s basically a 90-minute third act without the first two acts getting in the way. Also it features Oscar winner Brie Larson, and who doesn’t like watching her act?

If you like what you see, then you’ll want to discover Wheatley’s other work, starting with the small crime film Down Terrace, which kicked off his career. I also recommend the following dozen movies, some of which are direct influences on Wheatley, others being similar kinds of films, and then just whatever else I had determined worthy.

The Truce Hurts (1948)

Ben Wheatley loves Tom and Jerry cartoons and has cited them as an influence on his latest movie. I »

- Christopher Campbell

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The 50 Greatest Car Chases in Film: Part 2

19 April 2017 8:17 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The Fast and Furious movies aren't the only ones with great car chases. Join us as we take a look at the 50 best car chase scenes in film. This week, we're counting down from #25 to #1!

Like peanut butter and jelly, car chases and movies are two things that just go together perfectly. A chase is inherently interesting to watch - someone is trying their best to get away by any means possible, while the other party is trying to stop them from doing so. The danger involved, the threat of violence, and even the thrill of the hunt are all part of why we often can’t look away. A car chase is the next level of chase. They are fast - an embodiment of man and machine together. They are also dangerous - the stakes are incredibly high, and not just for the people involved in the chase.   

 

Movies »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘The Fate of the Furious’

14 April 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Assorted recommendations inspired by the multifarious sequel.Sorry, Marky Mark, but you’ve already got a car-based franchise.

By the time you’re done watching The Fate of the Furious, you’re likely to have forgotten some of its distinctly differing parts. The sequel begins as one thing then becomes another and another and another, delivering a thrilling mix of action sequences that don’t quite fit together as a fluid and cohesive whole.

I was reminded of a number of dissimilar movies while watching the eighth Fast and the Furious installment, so this week’s list of recommendations could be an even more mixed assortment than usual. But I have no interest in prescribing bad-tasting medicine like The Game Plan in response to Dwayne Johnson’s soccer dad scene. I’m also ignoring Jason Statham’s cheeky insult reminding Johnson and us all of his dumb Hercules movie.

Instead of going with the usual chronological trip »

- Christopher Campbell

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On Eve of ‘Fate of the Furious,’ F. Gary Gray Celebrates 25 Years of Filmmaking

5 April 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

F. Gary Gray was 16 when he decided he wanted to become a filmmaker. Always a compulsive planner, he drew up a step-by-step plan to break his way into the film business, and prepared himself to spend years in the trenches manning cameras, getting coffee on set, working as a driver. By his initial set of benchmarks, he hoped to be ready to direct his first feature by the time he turned 45.

As it turned out, that schedule was more than two decades off. Gray is now 47, and preparing to release his ninth feature later this month, nearly a quarter century after accepting his breakthrough directing gig, for Ice Cube’s “It Was a Good Day” video. The most expensive film of his career, “The Fate of the Furious” was shot across three different countries, from New York and Atlanta in the U.S. to Iceland and Cuba. It’s a long way, »

- Andrew Barker

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Free Fire: The 70’s Crime Pictures It Takes a Bullet From

1 April 2017 1:05 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tony Black on Free Fire

Let’s be honest, if you’ve seen Free Fire, you’ll know it’s not particularly like a lot of the 1970’s crime films that, on the face of it, Ben Wheatley’s movie would sit alongside. This pulpy, lean slice of comic violence owes more to the early 90’s stylistics of down’n’dirty Tarantino than to Scorsese or Friedkin, but given i’ts set in the 70’s, was executive produced by Martin Scorsese, and certainly has plenty of now retro-connections to that decade, this seems a good place to analyse Free Fire in the context of the crime pictures of that decade. Where does it fit? Should it fit at all? Or should it rather tuck in behind Reservoir Dogs and, anachronistically, exist slightly out of the time it’s very much rooted in?

Crime thrillers of the 1970’s, for a start, »

- Tony Black

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30 Years Back: Celebrating the Cinematic Delights of 1987

29 March 2017 4:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe celebrates the cinematic delights of 1987…

The 80’s mark a special period in cinema for me. It’s predominantly an age thing. I grew up throughout the 80’s, soaking in some fantastic films. It was a rising golden age of blockbusters which took the foundations of what guys like Spielberg and Lucas launched in the late 70’s, as that stark, gritty and dramatically challenging output that delivered some of the best films of all time (The Godfather and more), gave way to more crowd pleasing, optimistic fare. The cinematic landscape went from the likes of The French Connection, The Conversation, and Chinatown to the more light-hearted Star Wars or Jaws.

As blockbusters swarmed the cinemas and multiplexes began spreading, audiences demanded entertainment. That trend has carried on and intensified and it’s truer than ever in these days of Marvel adaptations. The 80’s got me into cinema. That passion »

- Amie Cranswick

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The Boys In The Band – QFest St. Louis Review

26 March 2017 5:39 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Review by Mark Longden

The Boys In The Band screens Wednesday, Mar. 29 at 9:00pm at the .Zack (3224 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo 63103) as part of this year’s QFest St. Louis. Ticket information can be found Here

As well as new movies, St Louis’ wonderful Qfest (now in its tenth year) also shows classics of queer cinema that blazed a trail and inspire all sorts of different reactions today. “The Boys In The Band”, an off-Broadway play that was transplanted with the entirety of its cast to the screen, is one such. A review from a revival in 1999 said that, even at the time of its release, it had “the stain of Uncle Tomism”, and it’s been called a minstrel show. But it’s much more than that.

 Despite occasionally wonderful direction from William Friedkin (who made “The French Connection” the next year) , its origins as a stage play are very evident, »

- Movie Geeks

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10th Annual Qfest St. Louis – Lgbtq Film Festival Runs March 29th – April 2nd at the .Zack

15 March 2017 5:42 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

It’s almost time to get your Q on, St. Louis!! 

The 10h Annual QFest St. Louis, presented by Cinema St. Louis, runs March 29th – April 2nd at the .Zack (3224 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo 63103)

The St. Louis-based Lgbtq film festival, QFest will present an eclectic slate of  films from filmmakers that represent a wide variety of voices in contemporary queer world cinema. The mission of the film festival is to use the art of contemporary gay cinema to illustrate the diversity of the Lgbtq community and to explore the complexities of living an alternative lifestyle.

All screenings at the .Zack (3224 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo 63103). Individual tickets are $13 for general admission, $10 for students and Cinema St. Louis members with valid and current photo IDs.

Advance tickets may be purchased at the Hi-Pointe Backlot box office or website. For more info, visit the Cinema St. Louis site Here

http://www. »

- Tom Stockman

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Is Steven Spielberg’s Trump-Timed ‘The Post’ the Start of a New Wave of Movies That Matter?

11 March 2017 12:01 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

I got a shiver of anticipation when I read the announcement on Monday that Steven Spielberg would direct “The Post,” a drama about The Washington Post’s role in exposing the Pentagon Papers, starring Tom Hanks as the fabled Post editor Ben Bradlee and Meryl Streep as publisher Katharine Graham. Set in 1971, the movie will center on the paper’s war with the White House over whether the Post had the right to publish the top-secret military documents — first leaked to The New York Times by Daniel Ellsberg — that charted the escalation and futility of the Vietnam War. I have no idea if Spielberg has been mulling this movie over for a while (the rights were bought by producer Amy Pascal last fall), but everything about the timing suggests that it’s no coincidence the announcement was made 45 days after the inauguration of Donald Trump. “The Post” is clearly a »

- Owen Gleiberman

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70s Rewind: The Other, Sun-dappled Horror in Hiding

3 March 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

A few weeks before five men were arrested for breaking and entering into Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex on June 17, 1972. the film version of Tom Tryon's popular novel The Other was released in U.S. theaters. Soon enough, the country would be embroiled in a political controversy that led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, but in the film world, all was (relatively) quiet. The month before, William Friedkin's The French Connection was presented with five Academy Awards, including Best Picture; "Theme from Shaft" took home the Oscar for Best Song. The year's early releases included Cabaret, Silent Running, What's Up, Doc?, Slaughterhouse-Five, Pink Flamingos, Fritz the Cat, and The Godfather; the latter dominated the box office when it...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Where do “Moonlight” and the other Oscar winners rank all time?

1 March 2017 12:57 PM, PST | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

With the dust settling from an Academy Awards unlike any other, we can turn our attention a bit to the results, as opposed to how the results were delivered/handled. This is something that’s probably best to take more time to think about, but I’m always fascinated by instant rankings. As such, I wanted not just to do the piece I always do on where the newest Best Picture winner stacks up all time, but also how the other main Oscar winners do. There will be expanded articles in the next month or so going over them in more detail, but for now, this is just a quick glance at where the new class ranks, all time. Before I get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, »

- Joey Magidson

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‘Moonlight’ is the Most Frugal Best Picture Ever: See Analysis of the 10 Lowest-Budget Winners of all Time

1 March 2017 8:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With a budget of $1.5 million, 2017 Best Picture winner “Moonlight” cost less than a 30-second ad during the Oscars (reported price: $2.2 million). And, among the category’s 89 winners, it stands as the lowest-budgeted film in the Academy Awards’ history.

To determine the 10 least expensive Best Picture winners, we looked back at each year, researched reported budgets, and then calculated them at 2017 dollar values. Although independent films have dominated the Oscars for the last decade, the only indie to make the cut from that period was “Crash.” Nor did Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall,” or some black-and-white studio classics like “Casablanca” or “The Lost Weekend.”

The 10 straddle almost every decade of the Oscars and come from either independent producers or smaller distributors (four of the 10 were released by United Artists).

For comparison, the most expensive film to win remains “Titanic;” its adjusted budget was $300 million more than “Moonlight.” That total dwarfs the »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Steven Spielberg’s Strange History With ‘Cruising’

15 February 2017 11:26 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Back in the early 1970s, while George Lucas was immortalizing the “cruising” culture of teens and their cars in “American Graffiti,” his future frequent collaborator Steven Spielberg was exploring a different kind. Nearly a decade before director William Friedkin created a scandal with the Al Pacino-starring “Cruising” (released 37 years ago today), the wunderkind filmmaker—who has won over generations of audiences by evoking a childlike sense of wonder—almost made his leap from TV to features with the most adult-themed project imaginable.

It all started with producer Philip D’Antoni, who had won an Oscar for the 1971 drug-bust saga “The French Connection” and was looking for a filmmaker to helm another New York City-set crime project. He had just bought the rights to the novel “Cruising,” written by The New York Times feature writer Gerald Walker, in which an undercover cop descends into the leather bars of Greenwich Village as he tracks a homosexual murderer. »

- Michael Gingold

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The ‘Logan’ IMAX Poster Goes Old School

14 February 2017 2:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

A few years ago, director James Mangold shared ten movies that inspired The Wolverine, his first outing in the X-Men universe. If nothing else, that list showcased Mangold as a man with great taste in classic and contemporary cinema. Few things make me happy quite like a filmmaker actively thinking about Black Narcissus and The French Connection while […]

The post The ‘Logan’ IMAX Poster Goes Old School appeared first on /Film. »

- Jacob Hall

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Sylvia Hoeks, William Fichtner Join Milo Gibson’s Action-Thriller ‘All the Devil’s Men’ (Exclusive)

13 February 2017 8:46 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dutch actress Sylvia Hoeks and William Fichtner have joined Milo Gibson and Gbenga Akinnagbe in the action-thriller “All the Devil’s Men” for GFM Films and producer Hannah Leader.

“All the Devil’s Men” is in pre-production with GFM handling sales at the Berlin Film Festival and assisting with production financing together with Ben White’s U.K.-based White & Co.

Gibson, who starred in his father Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge,” will play a battle-scarred War on Terror bounty hunter who’s forced to go to London on a manhunt for a disavowed CIA operative, with Fichtner and Akinnagbe as the other members of his team. They find themselves locked in deadly urban tactical combat with their former military comrade and his private army, who are protecting the operative. Hoeks will play the determined CIA handler in command of the mission.

Matthew Hope (“The Veteran”) is directing from his own script. »

- Dave McNary

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Review: William Friedkin's "To Live And Die In L.A." (1985); Blu-ray Special Edition From Shout! Factory

6 January 2017 5:48 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

William Friedkin’s To Live and Die in L.A., which opened on Friday, November 1, 1985 to lukewarm notices and underwhelming box office despite being championed by Roger Ebert’s four-star review, is a highly stylized, dark, and uncompromising crime thriller that boasts a then-unknown cast with a story and a pace that feels more suited to the 1970’s. It also contains what I consider to be the greatest car chase ever filmed and edited for a major motion picture, which took no less than five weeks to plan and shoot. Having seen Mr. Friedkin’s brilliant East Coast police thriller The French Connection (1971) on VHS in 1986, I made it a point the following year to catch up with his West Coast-based story of a Secret Service agent, Richard Chance (William Petersen), whose best friend and partner Jim Hart (Michael Greene) has been murdered by artist/currency counterfeiter Rick Masters »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

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Potographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

18 items from 2017


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