IMDb > The French Connection (1971)
The French Connection
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The French Connection (1971) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 59 | slideshow) Videos (see all 3)
The French Connection -- A pair of NYC cops in the Narcotics Bureau stumble onto a drug smuggling job with a French connection.
The French Connection -- Interview: Gene Hackman "on filming the car scene"

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   66,733 votes »
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Down 2% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)
Robin Moore (based on the book by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The French Connection on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 October 1971 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The time is just right for an out and out thriller like this. See more »
Plot:
A pair of NYC cops in the Narcotics Bureau stumble onto a drug smuggling job with a French connection. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 5 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 8 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(664 articles)
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 (From EW.com - Inside Movies. 7 November 2014, 7:00 AM, PST)

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Film Review: ‘The Connection’
 (From Variety - Film News. 28 October 2014, 1:23 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
A masterpiece of NYC hard-edged realism See more (264 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Hackman ... Jimmy Doyle

Fernando Rey ... Alain Charnier

Roy Scheider ... Buddy Russo

Tony Lo Bianco ... Sal Boca
Marcel Bozzuffi ... Pierre Nicoli
Frédéric de Pasquale ... Devereaux (as Frederic De Pasquale)

Bill Hickman ... Mulderig
Ann Rebbot ... Marie Charnier
Harold Gary ... Weinstock
Arlene Farber ... Angie Boca
Eddie Egan ... Simonson
André Ernotte ... La Valle (as Andre Ernotte)

Sonny Grosso ... Klein
Benny Marino ... Lou Boca
Patrick McDermott ... Chemist (as Pat McDermott)
Alan Weeks ... Pusher
Al Fann ... Informant
Irving Abrahams ... Police Mechanic
Randy Jurgensen ... Police Sergeant
William Coke ... Motorman
The Three Degrees ... The Three Degrees
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frank Adonis ... Bidder at New York Car Auction (uncredited)
Gilda Albertoni ... Uncredited (uncredited)
Robert Dahdah ... Man (uncredited)
Rhina Ferrari ... Woman at Airport (uncredited)
Sarina C. Grant ... Hooker on the Street (uncredited)
Joe Lo Grippo ... Tollbooth Collector (uncredited)
Melonie Haller ... Schoolgirl (uncredited)
Eric Jones ... Little Boy (uncredited)
Charles McGregor ... Baldy - Bar Patron in Drug Raid (uncredited)
Lora Mitchell ... Woman with Baby Carriage (uncredited)

Maureen Mooney ... Bicycle Girl (uncredited)
Silvano Nolemi ... Dock Worker (uncredited)
Burt Richards ... Auction Bidder (uncredited)
Fat Thomas ... Mutchie (uncredited)
Robert Weil ... Auctioneer (uncredited)

Directed by
William Friedkin 
 
Writing credits
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)

Robin Moore (based on the book by)

Howard Hawks  uncredited

Produced by
Philip D'Antoni .... producer
G. David Schine .... executive producer
Kenneth Utt .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Don Ellis (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Owen Roizman (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Gerald B. Greenberg (film editor) (as Jerry Greenberg)
 
Casting by
Robert Weiner (casting)
 
Art Direction by
Ben Kasazkow  (as Ben Kazaskow)
 
Set Decoration by
Edward Garzero  (as Ed Garzero)
 
Costume Design by
Joseph Fretwell III (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Irving Buchman .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Paul Ganapoler .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Terence A. Donnelly .... assistant director (as Terry Donnelly)
William C. Gerrity .... assistant director
Ron Walsh .... first assistant director (uncredited)
Dwight Williams .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Thomas Wright .... property master (as Tom Wright)
 
Sound Department
Christopher Newman .... sound (as Chris Newman)
Theodore Soderberg .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Sass Bedig .... special effects
 
Stunts
Bill Hickman .... stunt coordinator
Cliff Cudney .... stunts (uncredited)
George Fisher .... stunts (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunt double: Gene Hackman (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunts (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunts (uncredited)
Joe Pronto .... stunts (uncredited)
Alex Stevens .... stunts (uncredited)
Jerry Summers .... stunt driver (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Enrique Bravo .... camera operator
Robert Ward .... key grip
William Ward .... chief electrician (as Billy Ward)
Sandy Brooke .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Gary Muller .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Priestley Jr. .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Volpe .... dolly grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joseph W. Dehn .... wardrobe
Florence Foy .... wardrobe
 
Editorial Department
Norman Gay .... associate editor
Brent Eldridge .... colorist (digital color correction) (uncredited)
Maurice Schell .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Don Ellis .... music conducted by
Gene Cipriano .... musician (uncredited)
Richard Nash .... musician: trombone (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Eddie Egan .... technical consultant
Sonny Grosso .... technical consultant
Nicholas Sgarro .... script supervisor (as Nick Sgarro)
Fat Thomas .... location consultant
Sue Dwiggins .... production secretary (uncredited)
Monroe Friedman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
James O'Neill .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Ralph S. Singleton .... production assistant (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
104 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System) | 4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:18 (original rating) | Argentina:13 (re-rating) | Australia:M | Brazil:14 | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) (special edition) | Canada:R (Nova Scotia/Ontario) (original rating) | Canada:AA (Ontario) (special edition) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Canada:18A (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | France:U | Iceland:16 | Ireland:18 | Italy:T | Norway:18 | Norway:16 (1972) | Peru:18 | Philippines:R-18 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:NC-16 | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video rating) | USA:R (PCA #23054) | West Germany:16 (bw)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Al Copeland named his restaurant chain, Popeye's Mighty Good Fried Chicken, after Popeye Doyle, Gene Hackman's character in the film The French Connection (1971). The chain that grew from the one restaurant became Popeye's Famous Fried Chicken.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Popeye Doyle creeps alongside the building below the sniper his gun can be seen jumping hands between shots.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Merry Christmas. What's your name, little boy?
Little Boy:Eric.
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Uh-huh, Eric. What do you want for Christmas Eric? Hmmm?
See more »
Soundtrack:
Everybody Gets to Go to the MoonSee more »

FAQ

What does Popeye mean when he calls Charnier "Frog One"?
Why does Popeye keep hammering Willy with the "pick your feet Poughkeepsie" line?
How did they put the car back together so fast after ripping it apart?
See more »
116 out of 147 people found the following review useful.
A masterpiece of NYC hard-edged realism, 29 April 2005
Author: mstomaso from Vulcan

This is an intense, unremitting, intelligent and incredibly fast-paced film which blends action, cinematic realism, art and humor into a masterwork of hard-edged crime drama. But to categorize this film as drama, suspense or action really does violence to it. This is just a great film, and it doesn't fit comfortably into any category with which I am aware.

Don't look here for any sense of fantasy-justice or n'er-do-wrong comic book heroism. Look here instead for gut wrenching nihilism, frustration with the unfairness of criminal justice in the hands of bureaucracy, and a solid, plot-driven story about a couple of cops who are just trying to do their jobs as best they can.

And by all means, don't watch this film if you aren't fully awake and willing to be taken down the electric, ambiguous, and compelling roads it leads to. If you watch this film with any part of your brain turned off you'll end up asking questions like "plot, what plot?" The fact that some people can't find it reflects more on them as film-watchers than it does on this film. This film does not offer passive entertainment like most of the contemporary action market does. It makes you pay attention, though, at times you might not want to.

Hackman and Scheider are incredible, with some of the greatest chemistry I have ever seen between two young actors. They play two hard-ass NYC detectives looking to end the war on drugs more-or-less permanently by taking down an international conspiracy which they have just barely sniffed out. And make no mistake, they, particularly Hackman's "Popeye Doyle" are at war, and treat their jobs as a battlefield. Doyle pursues his quarry with utterly wreckless abandon, endangering the lives of dozens of people along the way. While both men are absolutely terrific, this stands out as one of Hackman's greatest performances, and his Oscar is well-deserved (not something you will see me say often). Backed by a strong supporting cast, and some of the best live-action cinematography of the late 20th century, this film does not allow you to turn away, get popcorn, or even deal with bodily functions for its entire duration.

Considered in the early 70s to be 'shockingly violent', this film does not even reach a tenth the degree of passive violent repulsion of the average Tarantino film, and it relies, instead, on amazing performances, flawless direction, a phenomenal post-modern soundtrack and edgy, tense camera-work. Unlike contemporary action film garbage, it also gives you complex characters who you can care about, but never fully understand. I will cut this review short because I am running out of superlatives. Anybody remotely interested in expanding or just appreciating the artistic breadth and depth of mainstream film needs to see this.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (264 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The French Connection (1971)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
I Don't Get It........... craig-s-nelson72
Why are they not remaking this? g_loogle
So you strip every inch of a car except for... neo_jenner
Makes for agood game of slug bug. jcaraway3
Jukebox song? c984564
That restaurant meal pyrrhus819
See more »

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