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The French Connection
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The French Connection (1971) More at IMDbPro »

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The French Connection -- New York City detectives Popeye Doyle (Gene Hackman) and Buddy Russo (Roy Scheider) hope to break a narcotics smuggling ring and ultimately uncover The French Connection. But when one of the criminals tries to kill Doyle, he begins a deadly pursuit that takes him far outside the city limits. Based on a true story, this action-filled thriller, with its renowned chase scene, won five Academy Awards in 1971, including Best Picture, Best Director (William Friedkin) and Best Actor for Hackman.
The French Connection -- A pair of NYC cops in the Narcotics Bureau stumble onto a drug smuggling job with a French connection.
The French Connection -- Interview: Gene Hackman "on filming the car scene"


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Up 19% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)
Robin Moore (based on the book by)
View company contact information for The French Connection on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 October 1971 (USA) See more »
The time is just right for an out and out thriller like this. See more »
A pair of NYC cops in the Narcotics Bureau stumble onto a drug smuggling job with a French connection. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Won 5 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 8 nominations See more »
(735 articles)
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User Reviews:
32 years and still relevant See more (273 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Hackman ... Jimmy Doyle

Fernando Rey ... Alain Charnier

Roy Scheider ... Buddy Russo

Tony Lo Bianco ... Sal Boca
Marcel Bozzuffi ... Pierre Nicoli
Frédéric de Pasquale ... Devereaux (as Frederic De Pasquale)

Bill Hickman ... Mulderig
Ann Rebbot ... Marie Charnier
Harold Gary ... Weinstock
Arlene Farber ... Angie Boca
Eddie Egan ... Simonson
André Ernotte ... La Valle (as Andre Ernotte)

Sonny Grosso ... Klein
Benny Marino ... Lou Boca
Patrick McDermott ... Chemist (as Pat McDermott)
Alan Weeks ... Pusher
Al Fann ... Informant
Irving Abrahams ... Police Mechanic
Randy Jurgensen ... Police Sergeant
William Coke ... Motorman
The Three Degrees ... The Three Degrees
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frank Adonis ... Bidder at New York Car Auction (uncredited)
Gilda Albertoni ... Uncredited (uncredited)
Robert Dahdah ... Man (uncredited)
Rhina Ferrari ... Woman at Airport (uncredited)
Sarina C. Grant ... Hooker on the Street (uncredited)
Joe Lo Grippo ... Tollbooth Collector (uncredited)
Melonie Haller ... Schoolgirl (uncredited)
Eric Jones ... Little Boy (uncredited)

Doris McCarthy ... Hotel Guest (uncredited)
Charles McGregor ... Baldy - Bar Patron in Drug Raid (uncredited)
Lora Mitchell ... Woman with Baby Carriage (uncredited)

Maureen Mooney ... Bicycle Girl (uncredited)
Silvano Nolemi ... Dock Worker (uncredited)
Burt Richards ... Auction Bidder (uncredited)
Willy Switkes ... Man (uncredited)
Fat Thomas ... Mutchie (uncredited)
Robert Weil ... Auctioneer (uncredited)

Directed by
William Friedkin 
Writing credits
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)

Robin Moore (based on the book by)

Howard Hawks  uncredited

Produced by
Philip D'Antoni .... producer
G. David Schine .... executive producer
Kenneth Utt .... associate producer
Original Music by
Don Ellis (music composed by)
Cinematography by
Owen Roizman (director of photography)
Film Editing by
Gerald B. Greenberg (film editor) (as Jerry Greenberg)
Casting by
Robert Weiner (casting)
Art Direction by
Ben Kasazkow  (as Ben Kazaskow)
Set Decoration by
Edward Garzero  (as Ed Garzero)
Costume Design by
Joseph Fretwell III (costumes)
Makeup Department
Irving Buchman .... makeup artist
Production Management
Paul Ganapoler .... unit production manager
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Terence A. Donnelly .... assistant director (as Terry Donnelly)
William C. Gerrity .... assistant director
Ron Walsh .... first assistant director (uncredited)
Dwight Williams .... dga trainee (uncredited)
Art Department
Thomas Wright .... property master (as Tom Wright)
Sound Department
Christopher Newman .... sound (as Chris Newman)
Theodore Soderberg .... sound
Special Effects by
Sass Bedig .... special effects
Bill Hickman .... stunt coordinator
Cliff Cudney .... stunts (uncredited)
Harry Daley .... stunts (uncredited)
George Fisher .... stunts (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunt double: Gene Hackman (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred J. Lincoln .... stunts (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunts (uncredited)
Joe Pronto .... stunts (uncredited)
Alex Stevens .... stunts (uncredited)
Jerry Summers .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Enrique Bravo .... camera operator
Robert Ward .... key grip
William Ward .... chief electrician (as Billy Ward)
Sandy Brooke .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Gary Muller .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Priestley Jr. .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Volpe .... dolly grip (uncredited)
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joseph W. Dehn .... wardrobe
Florence Foy .... wardrobe
Editorial Department
Norman Gay .... associate editor
Brent Eldridge .... colorist (digital color correction) (uncredited)
Maurice Schell .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Music Department
Don Ellis .... music conducted by
John Bilezikjian .... musician: oud (uncredited)
Gene Cipriano .... musician (uncredited)
Michael J. McDonald .... score remixer (uncredited)
Richard Nash .... musician: trombone (uncredited)
Other crew
Eddie Egan .... technical consultant
Sonny Grosso .... technical consultant
Nicholas Sgarro .... script supervisor (as Nick Sgarro)
Fat Thomas .... location consultant
Sue Dwiggins .... production secretary (uncredited)
Monroe Friedman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
James O'Neill .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Ralph S. Singleton .... production assistant (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
104 min
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System) | 4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Argentina:18 (original rating) | Argentina:13 (re-rating) | Australia:M | Brazil:14 | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) (special edition) | Canada:R (Nova Scotia/Ontario) (original rating) | Canada:AA (Ontario) (special edition) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Canada:18A (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | France:U | Iceland:16 | Ireland:18 | Italy:T | Norway:18 | Norway:16 (1972) | Peru:18 | Philippines:R-18 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:NC-16 | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video rating) | USA:R (PCA #23054) | West Germany:16 (bw)

Did You Know?

The sequence on the Times Square-Grand Central shuttle took two full days to shoot (without permission from the Transit Authority), even though it lasts for only a few minutes on screen. Car 6609, an R-17, is preserved at the Transit Museum in Brooklyn. A different trainset was apparently substituted between the time filming of that scene began and ended because the car numbers are not the same when Fernando Rey finally outwits Gene Hackman and leaves him behind at the station.See more »
Continuity: During the cat-and-mouse in the subway station, Popeye orders a grape drink from the snack bar, but seconds later on the train, he has a candy apple instead.See more »
[first lines]
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Merry Christmas. What's your name, little boy?
Little Boy:Eric.
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Uh-huh, Eric. What do you want for Christmas Eric? Hmmm?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Everybody Gets to Go to the MoonSee more »


What does Popeye mean when he calls Charnier "Frog One"?
Why does Popeye keep hammering Willy with the "pick your feet Poughkeepsie" line?
How did they put the car back together so fast after ripping it apart?
See more »
78 out of 100 people found the following review useful.
32 years and still relevant, 6 February 2003
Author: wrfarley from nyc, USA

I first saw The French Connection in the summer of '72 (after it won the Oscar), so it's reputation was fairly well sealed by then. I had seen fair number of 1971 films, including The Hospital, Nicholas and Alexandria, A Clockwork Orange, Shaft, Le Boucher, Dirty Harry. The French Connection was something different though. It seemed to leap off the screen. It gave me a feeling I no longer have when I leave a movie, which is when I stepped out into the street I felt I was still in the movie. Of course, the chase was spectacular, but what I most remember and still enjoy about the movie is the energy. Gene Hackman acted Popeye with his entire body: running, stamping his feet, fighting, pointing, running some more: the porkpie hat was not a meaningless appendage; it was part of him, whether he employed it for drug recovery or slamming it into the concrete. It's a cinematic performance that ranks with Chaplin and Keaton. Then there's the intoxicating mood of grey, dreary winter in New York 1970-71 that puts you into the show. And the editing. Note the cool shot of Doyle spinning out of the phone booth on Broome St. cutting right into the drone of the Brooklyn Bridge at daybreak; or the shots jammed together as Doyle yells at Pierre Nicoli on the departing train, cut to: the motorman's hand cut to: to the suspicious transit cop, cut to: to the closing train doors, etc. And no music to smooth it over! Whenever I see this film it looks like it's still happening.

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Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The French Connection (1971)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
pot roast and potatoes scene EliteData
What's with all the zooms? lionelstevens1
Vintage "French Connection" mashup urgeking
I Don't Get It........... craig-s-nelson72
Foreign car license plate piggoli-imdb
Love the film but let's face it, Popeye Doyle is an inept cop jaygill-1
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