IMDb > The French Connection (1971)
The French Connection
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The French Connection (1971) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   70,773 votes »
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Down 27% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)
Robin Moore (based on the book by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The French Connection on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 October 1971 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The time is just right for an out and out thriller like this. See more »
Plot:
A pair of NYC cops in the Narcotics Bureau stumble onto a drug smuggling job with a French connection. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 5 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 8 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
One of the 1970s best crime movies, and yes, that means one of the best ever. See more (269 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gene Hackman ... Jimmy Doyle

Fernando Rey ... Alain Charnier

Roy Scheider ... Buddy Russo

Tony Lo Bianco ... Sal Boca
Marcel Bozzuffi ... Pierre Nicoli
Frédéric de Pasquale ... Devereaux (as Frederic De Pasquale)

Bill Hickman ... Mulderig
Ann Rebbot ... Marie Charnier
Harold Gary ... Weinstock
Arlene Farber ... Angie Boca
Eddie Egan ... Simonson
André Ernotte ... La Valle (as Andre Ernotte)

Sonny Grosso ... Klein
Benny Marino ... Lou Boca
Patrick McDermott ... Chemist (as Pat McDermott)
Alan Weeks ... Pusher
Al Fann ... Informant
Irving Abrahams ... Police Mechanic
Randy Jurgensen ... Police Sergeant
William Coke ... Motorman
The Three Degrees ... The Three Degrees
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frank Adonis ... Bidder at New York Car Auction (uncredited)
Gilda Albertoni ... Uncredited (uncredited)
Robert Dahdah ... Man (uncredited)
Rhina Ferrari ... Woman at Airport (uncredited)
Sarina C. Grant ... Hooker on the Street (uncredited)
Joe Lo Grippo ... Tollbooth Collector (uncredited)
Melonie Haller ... Schoolgirl (uncredited)
Eric Jones ... Little Boy (uncredited)

Doris McCarthy ... Hotel Guest (uncredited)
Charles McGregor ... Baldy - Bar Patron in Drug Raid (uncredited)
Lora Mitchell ... Woman with Baby Carriage (uncredited)

Maureen Mooney ... Bicycle Girl (uncredited)
Silvano Nolemi ... Dock Worker (uncredited)
Burt Richards ... Auction Bidder (uncredited)
Willy Switkes ... Man (uncredited)
Fat Thomas ... Mutchie (uncredited)
Robert Weil ... Auctioneer (uncredited)

Directed by
William Friedkin 
 
Writing credits
Ernest Tidyman (screenplay)

Robin Moore (based on the book by)

Howard Hawks  uncredited

Produced by
Philip D'Antoni .... producer
G. David Schine .... executive producer
Kenneth Utt .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Don Ellis (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Owen Roizman (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Gerald B. Greenberg (film editor) (as Jerry Greenberg)
 
Casting by
Robert Weiner (casting)
 
Art Direction by
Ben Kasazkow  (as Ben Kazaskow)
 
Set Decoration by
Edward Garzero  (as Ed Garzero)
 
Costume Design by
Joseph Fretwell III (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Irving Buchman .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Paul Ganapoler .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Terence A. Donnelly .... assistant director (as Terry Donnelly)
William C. Gerrity .... assistant director
Ron Walsh .... first assistant director (uncredited)
Dwight Williams .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Thomas Wright .... property master (as Tom Wright)
 
Sound Department
Christopher Newman .... sound (as Chris Newman)
Theodore Soderberg .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Sass Bedig .... special effects
 
Stunts
Bill Hickman .... stunt coordinator
Cliff Cudney .... stunts (uncredited)
George Fisher .... stunts (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunt double: Gene Hackman (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Bill Hickman .... stunts (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunts (uncredited)
Joe Pronto .... stunts (uncredited)
Alex Stevens .... stunts (uncredited)
Jerry Summers .... stunt driver (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Enrique Bravo .... camera operator
Robert Ward .... key grip
William Ward .... chief electrician (as Billy Ward)
Sandy Brooke .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Gary Muller .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Priestley Jr. .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Tom Volpe .... dolly grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joseph W. Dehn .... wardrobe
Florence Foy .... wardrobe
 
Editorial Department
Norman Gay .... associate editor
Brent Eldridge .... colorist (digital color correction) (uncredited)
Maurice Schell .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Don Ellis .... music conducted by
John Bilezikjian .... musician: oud (uncredited)
Gene Cipriano .... musician (uncredited)
Michael J. McDonald .... score remixer (uncredited)
Richard Nash .... musician: trombone (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Eddie Egan .... technical consultant
Sonny Grosso .... technical consultant
Nicholas Sgarro .... script supervisor (as Nick Sgarro)
Fat Thomas .... location consultant
Sue Dwiggins .... production secretary (uncredited)
Monroe Friedman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
James O'Neill .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Ralph S. Singleton .... production assistant (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
104 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System) | 4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:18 (original rating) | Argentina:13 (re-rating) | Australia:M | Brazil:14 | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) (special edition) | Canada:R (Nova Scotia/Ontario) (original rating) | Canada:AA (Ontario) (special edition) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Canada:18A (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | France:U | Iceland:16 | Ireland:18 | Italy:T | Norway:18 | Norway:16 (1972) | Peru:18 | Philippines:R-18 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:NC-16 | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video rating) | USA:R (PCA #23054) | West Germany:16 (bw)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Having participated in the making of this film, detective Eddie Egan decided to retire from NYPD and start a career in Hollywood. The NYPD, however, brought charges against him for minor errors in reporting and handling of evidence. In Egan's trial director William Friedkin testified on his behalf and Roy Scheider was also present. Egan was dismissed from the police force just hours before his retirement, and his pension was taken away. The decision was later appealed in court and reversed.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: When Doyle and Charnier are at the Grand Central Shuttle, a subway train departs, then returns on the same track with completely different car numbers on it. On the Grand Central Shuttle, each train only runs on one track, making it impossible under normal operation for trains to switch tracks.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Merry Christmas. What's your name, little boy?
Little Boy:Eric.
Jimmy 'Popeye' Doyle:Uh-huh, Eric. What do you want for Christmas Eric? Hmmm?
See more »
Soundtrack:
Jingle BellsSee more »

FAQ

What does Popeye mean when he calls Charnier "Frog One"?
Why does Popeye keep hammering Willy with the "pick your feet Poughkeepsie" line?
How did they put the car back together so fast after ripping it apart?
See more »
76 out of 102 people found the following review useful.
One of the 1970s best crime movies, and yes, that means one of the best ever., 15 June 2003
Author: Infofreak from Perth, Australia

'The French Connection' has really stood the test of time. William Friedkin is one American director who has almost been forgotten about, despite making some excellent movies like 'The Birthday Party', 'The Exorcist' and 'Cruising'. 'The French Connection' is his best movie by far, and one of the 1970s best crime movies, which means it's one of the best EVER. The lead actors are first rate, and the script by Ernest Tidyman ('Shaft') is a good one, but Friedkin makes this something special by applying documentary film techniques to this gritty and realistic detective story. 'The French Connection' was groundbreaking in this respect and influenced just about every subsequent cop movie, all the way up to contemporary TV shows like 'NYPD Blue' and the like. Gene Hackman is just terrific as Popeye Doyle. Hackman had been around for about ten years, and impressed many with his supporting role in 'Bonnie And Clyde', but this movie made him a major star. Along with 'The Conversation' and 'Scarecrow' it's still one of his most impressive performances. Roy Scheider was almost a complete unknown prior to this but he's also very good as Popeye's partner Buddy Russo. Scheider went on to some fine work in movies such as 'Jaws', 'Marathon Man', 'Last Embrace', '52 Pick-Up' and 'Naked Lunch', but never quite became the big name star that Hackman did. Bunuel regular Fernando Rey (cast by mistake after a misunderstanding, Friedkin thinking he was hiring a different actor!) and the underrated character actor Tony Lo Bianco, who had recently appeared in the cult classic 'The Honeymoon Killers', lead a fine supporting cast who really add to the movie's success. The exciting car chase sequence in this movie is now legendary, and is arguably the best one ever filmed, but there is so much more to this film than just that. 'The French Connection' is a superb movie, and still better than just about any similar Hollywood crime thriller made in the last few years. Highly recommended!

Was the above review useful to you?
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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The French Connection (1971)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
I Don't Get It........... craig-s-nelson72
What was Charnier eating? fcolli
33 things we learned about the French Connection ThrashMetalGuy
How do we know the man killed at the start is a cop? robertrichardson-24598
Car Auction SueBee55
Love the film but let's face it, Popeye Doyle is an inept cop jaygill-1
See more »

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