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Dracula vs. Frankenstein (1971) Poster

Trivia

At this point in his career, J. Carrol Naish was very ill and frail and could no longer remember dialogue, so he read it off cue cards. However, he had only one real eye, so in his dialogue closeups you can see one eye moving back and forth, reading the lines, while the other eye remains fixed in position.
Much of the electrical lab equipment in Duryea's lab are props originally used in Frankenstein (1931). Ken Strickfaden, who had designed all the electrical gadgetry in that film, supplied the equipment.
J. Carrol Naish had false teeth, and their clicking sound can be heard several times on the soundtrack.
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J. Carrol Naish and Lon Chaney Jr. filmed their original scenes in March-April 1969; the Dracula-Frankenstein footage was shot over a year later.
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Final film of Lon Chaney Jr.
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Final film of J. Carrol Naish.
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Originally planned as a sequel to Satan's Sadists (1969), with Russ Tamblyn and other "bikers" reprising their parts from that film. However, not long after filming began, it was decided to turn it into a horror film instead of a biker picture and much of the footage with Tamblyn and other actors from the first film was cut out. They were unable to cut them completely out of the movie, though, which is why Tamblyn and his biker gang seem to be wandering in and out of the film, with no connection to the story line and with not much to do.
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It was originally intended to have Dracula turn Frankenstein's Monster into a bloodthirsty vampire, so the Monster could better serve the Count's purpose. The idea was dropped, however, when the fangs kept falling out of actor John Bloom's mouth, which he couldn't keep in due to his heavy makeup.
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In his scene confronting Count Dracula, J. Carrol Naish looks noticeably older than he does elsewhere in the film. This is due to the time that had elapsed between the bulk of his scenes, when it was intended as a different film entirely, and the Dracula/Frankenstein scenes that were grafted on later.
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While Lon Chaney Jr shot his scenes for this movie before The Female Bunch (1971) this movie was released after. By default both movies can be classed as his final movie.
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Getting special billing as "The Creature," Shelly Weiss actually plays the Frankenstein Monster in the climactic showdown in the church, ending in its dismemberment. This sequence was the only one shot in New York rather than Hollywood, thus the casting change, suggested by Zandor Vorkov, aka Roger Engel.
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Frankenstein's Monster, played by John Bloom, kills a police officer played by Albert Cole. The same year, Bloom and Cole played the title creature together in The Incredible 2-Headed Transplant (1971).
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The music that plays in Chaney's last scene is recycled music from various Universal horrors for which Chaney is best remembered for.
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Lon Chaney Jr. appears in this film which features both Dracula and The Frankenstein Monster. Chaney Jr. played both roles in Son of Dracula (1943) and The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942) respectively.
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The music heard during the climax is recycled from the score from Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954).
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According to the March 30, 1969 date on the telegram Regina Carrol receives at the beginning of the film, the action of this film takes place in early April 1969.
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Actresses Ann Morell and Maria Lease briefly appear topless.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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