A Clockwork Orange
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 75 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Stanley Kubrick's 13 movies ranked from worst to best

26 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Stanley Kubrick was a sucker for order, so he might have appreciated the desire to catalogue his career. However, since his films often warn against placing too much faith in systems, perhaps he knew that this way madness lies.

Frankly, most of his films have fair claim to being number one, so establishing first amongst equals means some hard choices have been made along the way - just try not to trigger the doomsday device or start swinging the axe if you don't agree.

So without further ado, let's open the pod bay doors and enter the enigmatic, exceptional work of Stanley Kubrick.

13. Fear and Desire (1953)

Even a genius has to start somewhere. Already a successful magazine photographer and documentary maker, 24-year-old Kubrick directed his debut about a military mission on limited funds - it was shot silently with sound added later.

Plagued by difficulties, Kubrick later called it "a completely inept oddity, »

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Watch: #Tbt - The Trailer for Stanley Kubrick's 'A Clockwork Orange' Will Send You Into A Vicious Fit

23 July 2015 8:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Watch: Vintage 29-Minute Talk With Anthony Burgess & Malcolm McDowell About Stanley Kubrick's 'A Clockwork Orange' "Ludovico technique": A form of aversion therapy in which a patient is forced to watch, through the use of specula to hold their eyes open, violent images for long periods, while under the effect of a nausea, paralysis and fear-inducing drug. But of course you'd already know that if you've seen Stanley Kubrick's dystopian masterpiece, "A Clockwork Orange." For Alex DeLarge, the main baddie -- or goodie, depending where you stand on suppressive societies -- this involved being strapped to a chair while heavy doses of Nazi propaganda, conveniently scored to the tunes of Beethoven, were blasted at your face. You may think this exceptionally cruel, O my brothers, but don't forget Alex had beaten up an elderly vagrant, stolen a car, broken into a man's home, crippled him, »

- Jon Fusco

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Daily | Rivers, Kubrick, Tsai

21 July 2015 5:05 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup: A Ben Rivers installation in London and a Tsai Ming-liang exhibition in China. Revisiting Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange and The Shining. Adrian Martin on mise en scène. Plus articles on Jean-Luc Godard, Catherine Breillat, Billy Wilder, Errol Morris, Takashi Murakami, Guy Maddin, Penelope Spheeris, Kris Swanberg and Josephine Decker. And word on Kanye West and Steve McQueen's video, Oleg Sentsov's trial and Cate Blanchett's television series. And we remember Alex Rocco and George Coe. » - David Hudson »

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Aubrey Morris, ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor, Has Died At 89

18 July 2015 12:17 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

British actor Aubrey Morris, who was best known for playing Mr. Deltoid in A Clockwork Orange, died Wednesday. He was 89. Aubrey Morris Dies Morris’ agent confirmed his passing, reported Variety. In Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, Morris threw himself into the part of a probation officer, who cautions Alex (Malcolm McDowell) about continuing on his […]

The post Aubrey Morris, ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor, Has Died At 89 appeared first on uInterview. »

- Chelsea Regan

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Aubrey Morris Dies – British Actor Known For ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Was 89

17 July 2015 2:53 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

British character actor Aubrey Morris died Wednesday at age 89, his agent has confirmed. To movie audiences, particularly in the United States, he was best known as Alex’s probation officer in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. But Morris’ 75 year career included numerous roles in classic television shows and stage plays, and appearances in over 50 feature films. He was born Aubrey Steinberg to a large family in Portsmouth in 1926. Following in the footsteps of his… »

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Aubrey Morris Dies – British Actor Known For ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Was 89

17 July 2015 2:53 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

British character actor Aubrey Morris died Wednesday at age 89, his agent has confirmed. To movie audiences, particularly in the United States, he was best known as Alex’s probation officer in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. But Morris’ 75 year career included numerous roles in classic television shows and stage plays, and appearances in over 50 feature films. He was born Aubrey Steinberg to a large family in Portsmouth in 1926. Following in the footsteps of his… »

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Aubrey Morris, ‘Clockwork Orange’ Actor, Dead at 89

17 July 2015 12:35 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

British character actor Aubrey Morris, best known for playing the probation officer in Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 cult film “A Clockwork Orange” has died, his agent confirmed on Friday. He was 89. During his five-decade career, Morris also appeared as a grave-digger opposite Christopher Lee and Edward Woodward in the cult horror film “The Wicker Man” as well as such films as “Lisztomania,” Woody Allen’s “Love and Death” and “My Girl 2.” His many TV credits include “The Saint,” “The Sweeney,” “The Prisoner,” “The Avengers” and BBC drama “Cold Comfort Farm.” Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 (Photos) Born in Portsmouth, »

- Debbie Emery

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‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor Aubrey Morris Dies at 89

17 July 2015 10:32 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

London — Actor Aubrey Morris, best known for his role as Mr. Deltoid in Stanley Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange,” has died. He was 89.

Morris died Wednesday, his agent told the BBC.

The character actor had a memorable scene in “A Clockwork Orange” in which his probation officer character cautions the protagonist, Alex (played by Malcolm McDowell), about getting into trouble. “I’m warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself,” Morris says in the scene (below).

The British actor’s other movie credits include Robin Hardy’s horror film “The Wicker Man,” the musical “Lisztomania,” Woody Allen’s comedy “Love and Death” and the dramedy “My Girl 2,” with Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis.

His five-decade long career also included TV work. He made his first TV appearance in »

- Leo Barraclough

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‘A Clockwork Orange’ Actor Aubrey Morris Dies at 89

17 July 2015 10:32 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Actor Aubrey Morris, best known for his role as Mr. Deltoid in Stanley Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange,” has died. He was 89.

Morris died Wednesday, his agent told the BBC.

The character actor had a memorable scene in “A Clockwork Orange” in which his probation officer character cautions the protagonist, Alex (played by Malcolm McDowell), about getting into trouble. “I’m warning you, little Alex, being a good friend to you as always, the one man in this sore and sick community who wants to save you from yourself,” Morris says in the scene (below).

The British actor’s other movie credits include Robin Hardy’s horror film “The Wicker Man,” the musical “Lisztomania,” Woody Allen’s comedy “Love and Death” and the dramedy “My Girl 2,” with Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis.

His five-decade long career also included TV work. He made his first TV appearance in »

- Leo Barraclough

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Aubrey Morris Dead: A Clockwork Orange Actor Dies at 89

17 July 2015 3:55 AM, PDT | Us Weekly | See recent Us Weekly news »

Actor Aubrey Morris has passed away at the age of 89. The veteran star, who is known best for his role of P.R. Deltoid in 1971's A Clockwork Orange, died on Wednesday, July 15, his agent confirmed to the BBC. Morris started his acting career on the small screen before making his big-screen debut in the 1960s. The British thespian's early film work includes roles in Night Caller From Outer Space with John Saxon and Maurice Denham, The Sandwich Man with Bernard Cribbins and Dora Bryan, and [...] »

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A Clockwork Orange actor Aubrey Morris dies, aged 89

16 July 2015 12:07 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Character actor Aubrey Morris has died, aged 89.

Morris, who passed away yesterday (July 15), had roles in numerous cult classics on the big and small screen over a 50-year period.

He was perhaps most widely known for his brief but memorable part in A Clockwork Orange, as Alex's unnerving probation officer Mr Deltoid.

Other movies included The Wicker Man, Love and Death and Lisztomania, while he made TV appearances in The Prisoner, The Avengers, The Sweeney and The Saint.

Morris also had multiple theatre roles on the West End and Broadway, while his final acting appearance came earlier this year in Us comedy series It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Watch Morris in A Clockwork Orange with Malcolm McDowell below: »

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Aubrey Morris obituary

16 July 2015 10:47 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stalwart character actor who appeared as Mr Deltoid in A Clockwork Orange and as one of the gruesome locals in The Wicker Man

In 1957, the character actor Aubrey Morris, who has died aged 89, was praised by Kenneth Tynan for his “mimetic cunning … wreathed in cringing smiles”. Adept at the vaguely camp and suggestively sinister, Morris always left an unconventional stamp on even the smallest, and seemingly conventional, roles. Small and rotund, with gleaming eyes, and occasionally wearing round spectacles, he could convey obsessions and monstrosity at odds with his corporeality. His visual characteristics included a wide smile, which displayed a prominent upper row of teeth, and a sly, sideways glance. With his distinctive, precise speech pattern, he could draw out vowel sounds amusingly, or unnervingly.

A career that lasted for more than 60 years took him from the Old Vic through much British television to Broadway and then Hollywood. One of »

- Gavin Gaughan

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Nerd Alert: The Joker Vs Deadpool and Terminator Genisys Easter Eggs

6 July 2015 12:27 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Welcome to today's edition of Nerd Alert, where we have all the off-beat, nerdy news for you in one convenient spot. What do we have in store for you on this marvelous Monday? We have a comprehensive video breakdown of all the Easter Eggs in Terminator Genisys, an animated video that shows Sean Connery portraying Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings and The Simpsons gets an Akira mashup. If that wasn't enough, Shia Labeouf's intense motivational speech even gets the anime treatment. But first, we have the ultimate battle between The Joker and Harley Quinn as they square off against Deadpool and Domino. So, sit back, relax, and check out all that today's Nerd Alert has to offer.

Super Power Beat Down: Joker & Harley Quinn vs. Deadpool and Domino

The latest episode of Bat In the Sun's series Super Power Beat Down features characters from 2 of next year's highly-anticipated superhero movies, »

- MovieWeb

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The Tivoli Announces the ‘Reel Late’ Midnight Line-Up – Jurassic Park, The Room, Zardoz

4 July 2015 9:08 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“You’Re Tearing Me Apart, Lisa!”

Another great lineup of midnight movies for the ‘Reel Late at The Tivoli’ for late July through early September. It’s a typically good variety of titles that will draw the late night movie buff crowd and a couple of retro surprises are to be found. The Midnight Movie experience has always catered to a college-age crowd and that’s the way it should be. When I was that age, in the early ’80s, midnight standards included A Clockwork Orange (1971), The Graduate (1967), Night Of The Living Dead (1968), King Of Hearts (1966), and Harold And Maude (1971). Those last two haven’t shown in many years. King Of Hearts especially seems to have fallen off the cult movie radar , so imagine my surprise when I saw that the Tivoli had Harold And Maude as part of their new line-up. That’ll be some old school midnight fun »

- Tom Stockman

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Kcc: Reitzell embraces distortion, homage in standout score to Hannibal, Ep. 3.05, “Contorno”

3 July 2015 7:40 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Kate’s Classical Corner: Hannibal, Ep. 3.05, “Contorno”

As a classical musician, I can’t help but be influenced in my interpretation of Hannibal by its amazing score and soundtrack, composed and compiled by music supervisor Brian Reitzell. This is not intended to be a definitive reading of Reitzell or showrunner Bryan Fuller’s intentions in regards to the music, but rather an exploration of how these choices affect my appreciation of the given episode. Read my review of “Contorno” here.

Piano Sonata in B-flat major, K. 333, III. Allegretto grazioso by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1784): Hannibal plays the piano

Both of the classical pieces featured in this episode were presumably chosen as direct references to other works, the first of which is Thomas HarrisHannibal, in which Hannibal plays this Mozart Sonata on a harpsichord. The particular performance of the piece used is lovely and fluid, though this makes the shots »

- Kate Kulzick

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Hannibal, Ep. 3.05, “Contorno” is disjointed, but immensely entertaining

3 July 2015 7:36 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Hannibal, Season 3, Episode 5, “Contorno”

Written by Tom de Ville and Bryan Fuller & Steve Lightfoot

Directed by Guillermo Navarro

Airs Thursdays at 10pm (Et) on NBC

In my review of “Aperitivo”, I called for Hannibal to find a sweet spot between the slow-moving introspection of “Secondo” and plot-heavy momentum of “Aperitivo”. “Contorno” does just that, though not in the way expected. The first half of the episode crawls (particularly the scenes with Will and Chiyoh), dragging its feet to prevent the characters from intersecting, before the second half throws this concern out the window and sprints forward, bringing first Pazzi and Hannibal, then Hannibal and Alana, and finally Jack and Hannibal together in memorable and electrifying exchanges. One can almost see showrunner Bryan Fuller reach his limit with angsty, mini-Hannibal Will and decide to chuck him off the train rather than write one more doom-laden conversation between him and Chiyoh. »

- Kate Kulzick

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The Ten Most Stylish Guys in Movie History

3 July 2015 12:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

They say that clothes make the man. They also make the man in the movie and, sometimes, even make the movie itself live on in the annals of classic filmdom. With that in mind, here is a list (in no particular order) of ten gents and the characters they played who changed our sartorial habits forever.

1. Michael Douglas/Gordon Gecko—Wall Street

Arguably the movie that set the style for second half of the 1980s, Oliver Stone’s Wall Street featured Michael Douglas’ Oscar-winning turn as corporate raider Gordon Gecko, whose ruthlessness in the boardroom was only matched by his sense of style. Douglas is all clean lines in his pinstripe suits, suspenders and slicked-back hair, creating an iconic look that screamed “power” and “go fuck yourself” simultaneously.

2. Malcolm McDowell/AlexA Clockwork Orange

Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian sci-fi allegory is one of cinema’s great dark satires, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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10 Great Films Banned For Ridiculous Reasons

27 June 2015 3:30 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

TriStar Pictures

Cinema has an almost unparalleled ability to upset and offend. From the terror caused by the train heading towards the audience to the copy-cat crimes that caused Stanley Kubrick to voluntarily remove A Clockwork Orange from circulation, films have inspired negative reaction since their very beginning. That’s where the censors come in.

It’s the job of ratings boards like the BBFC (in Britain) and the MPAA (in America) to make sure films that have the ability to disturb, offend or otherwise be awful on a wide scale are either cut – as is the case with every Human Centipede film – or otherwise banned – as it the case with every Human Centipede film until Tom Six acquiesces with the requested cuts.

Without wanting to celebrate censorship, most ratings boards usually have a good reason for banning a film: it’s horribly violent, racist, sexist, involves rape, invokes terrorism, »

- Tom Baker

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Filmmaker Marc Forster to make Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Downslope’ into a trilogy

22 June 2015 8:45 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As reported by Deadline, Stanley Kubrick’s written script for The Downslope will now be made into a film series by World War Z and Finding Neverland director Marc Forster, who will serve as producer for all three films and director for the first. Kubrick wrote the script in 1956 after his film Fear and Desire hit theaters, and before he started working on Paths of Glory. The film is said to be “a sweeping, historical action-drama,” according to Deadline, and will revolve around the Civil War. The first film of the trilogy will be based on Kubrick’s script and concept, and the subsequent films will expand on his original ideas and focus on the after-effects of the Civil War.

Kubrick’s death in 1999 has obviously not stopped his ideas from reaching the big screen, as seen with Spielberg’s film A.I. Artificial Intelligence in 2001. That film was brought about »

- Sarah

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Stanley Kubrick's 1956 Screenplay The Downslope To Be Made Into A Trilogy

22 June 2015 3:28 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Deadline reported earlier that a screenplay that Stanley Kubrick (The Shining, A Clockwork Orange and Full Metal Jacket) wrote in 1956 will be developed into a trilogy. Kubrick wrote the civil war era screenplay, The Downslope, between other war films, Fear and Desire and Paths to Glory. The trilogy of films will be produced by Marc Forster (Monster's Ball and World War Z) and he will direct the first installment. An anti-war story, The Downslope focuses on a bitter, strategic series of Civil War battles in the Shenandoah Valley between young Union General George Armstrong Custer and Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby (known as the Gray Ghost for his stealth strategies). His cavalrymen, known as Mosby's Rangers, continually outsmarted the much-larger enemy forces in a sequence of...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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