A Clockwork Orange
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Directors' Trademarks: Stanley Kubrick

26 February 2015 5:21 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

At least once a month, Cinelinx will chose one director for an in-depth examination of the “signatures” that they leave behind in their work. This week we’re examining the trademark style and calling signs of Stanley Kubrick as director.

Kubrick’s interest in visual arts began with photography before he became interested in filmmaking. He enjoyed making short films and became very proficient at doing so. Eventually he made his first feature film The Killing Fields (1953) as an exercise in low-budget filmmaking. That film was not a commercial success, and he had to work hard to get funding to keep working as a filmmaker. His next film, Killer’s Kiss (1955) involved a lot of experimentation, so much that it ended up eating into the budget and costing Kubrick a profit. As a result, he decided to work with a professional crew on his next film, The Killing (1956), which also did not become commercially successful, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Farewell, Ee Wednesdays! Watch Mr Dresden's best Orange pitch adverts

25 February 2015 5:28 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

After treating cinema fans for more than a decade, Ee's 2-for-1 ticket offer is coming to an end today (February 25). We'll certainly miss breaking up the week with a cut-price cinema visit, and the end of the promotion has made us all nostalgic about the classic Orange Wednesdays ads that started it all off.

Dubbed 'Orange Gold Spots', they starred Brennan Brown and Steve Furst as two clueless film execs listening to pitches from some of Hollywood's finest. Brilliantly lampooning the bean counter thinking of studio suits and the fragile creative egos of A-listers, the likes of Patrick Swayze, Macaulay Culkin and Carrie Fisher all stepped up to offer their increasingly compromised film pitches:

1. A Clockwork Orange

This early offering sought to capture that creative moment when the lightbulb flicks on... unfortunately Brown's dim-witted exec can't quite grasp what's dangling right in front of him. Stanley Kubrick would be livid. »

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Watch: 28-Minute Documentary 'Six Different Kinds Of Light' About Stanley Kubrick Cinematographer John Alcott

24 February 2015 11:01 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Sunday’s Academy Awards marked an historical moment in the annals of cinematography. With his win for “Birdman,” Emmanuel Lubezki became just the fifth cinematographer ever in Hollywood history to win back-to-back Oscars (he took home the statuette last year for “Gravity”). Lubezki’s impressive and deservingly Oscar-winning “single-take” illusion will surely be much discussed over the coming weeks, but let’s take a moment now to turn back the pages of the history books and revisit one of the late, great cinematographers — John Alcott. Alcott passed away nearly 30 years ago, but he remains, in memory, one of the best cinematographers of his time. Though he has multiple additional credits to his name, he is best known for his four collaborations with Stanley Kubrick. The two men first worked together on “2001: A Space Odyssey”; their partnership then continued over Kubrick’s next three films, “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon, »

- Zach Hollwedel

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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Video Games That Can Win Goty, But Not An Oscar

21 February 2015 10:26 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

With the Oscars this weekend I thought it would be fun to look at movies that were snubbed from them and translate them to video games. When I followed the Oscars closely I noticed movies would be snubbed for such lame excuses. Putting it lightly, if your movie is a big blockbuster event… It will probably be ignored. If it’s action, if it's science fiction, if it’s mainstream, and even if it’s adapted it will have trouble competing. Lord of the Rings somehow fought through it all to win, but for the most part this stands true. So what games would win Game of the Year(Goty), but wouldn’t win an Oscar?

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(For this article, Goty isn’t just from the Vga’s as I feel that is mostly an advertising platform. These games won, or were nominated »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Dustin Spino)

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“I Never Had Any Interest in Becoming a Cinematographer Until 1965, When I Met Stanley Kubrick”: A Rare Profile of d.p. John Alcott

18 February 2015 7:53 AM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Here’s a true deep cut, evidently taped off New Jersey’s Wnet and now resurrected on the internet. This ’80s profile of d.p. John Alcott (A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon) features a lot of on-set footage of the cinematographer plying his craft; if you’re a big Beastmaster fan, this is for you. If just interested in the Kubrick stories you may want to skip to the 8-minute mark (where the d.p. talks about his initial collaborations with the director) and then to 14:20 or so, where Alcott discusses waiting patiently to capture very particular wind and cloud changes on the set of Barry […] »

- Filmmaker Staff

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Watch: 10-Minute Video Essay Explores Nicolas Winding Refn's Subversive 'Bronson'

17 February 2015 9:25 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

If you haven’t seen Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Bronson” yet, you really should. The outspoken and controversial Danish director broke into the mainstream with his neon-and-blood-slicked urban fairy tale “Drive," and swiftly rejected popular acceptance a mere three years later with the polarizing and underrated “Only God Forgives.” But it is 2008’s “Bronson” – a delirious kaleidoscope of psychotic violence, sickening humor, and eye-popping color schemes – that remains arguably his most vital work. It’s the film that made the world take notice of Tom Hardy, who gave his most over-the-top and entertaining performance to date (which is really saying something) as Britian’s most violent prisoner. And yet while the film certainly owes a modest degree of its stark-raving-mad energy to sources that run the gamut from “A Clockwork Orange” to Wagnerian opera, “Bronson” is its own strange potion. It’s certainly no more of a standard prison movie »

- Nicholas Laskin

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‘The Killing’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Academy)

12 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C. Flippen, Ted de Corsia, Marie Windsor, Elisha Cook Jr., Joe Sawyer, Timothy Carey, Kola Kwariani, Dorothy Adams | Written and Directed by Stanley Kubrick

It goes without saying that film fans know that Stanley Kubrick was a master of his art.  All masters though have a starting point where they were learning and in some respects were yet to evolve into the legends that they would become.  With the Arrow Academy release of The Killing on Blu-ray, which also includes Killer’s Kiss we get to see a director who had a vision, but was yet to perfect his style.

The Killing is a heist movie that when it was first released didn’t make that much of an impact, but not surprisingly when it comes to Kubrick’s work has grown to be respected and revered as a true classic of the genre. »

- Paul Metcalf

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

7 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their second piece, they will discuss Stanley Kubrick’s film The Killing (1956).

Drew’s Take

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with a career that included such amazing films as Paths of Glory (1957),Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964),2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980), that’s not an indication that The Killing is a film of poor quality but an indication that Kubrick’s body of work comes the closest to cinematic perfection than any director I can think of. Thus, while The Killing »

- Landon Palmer

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Editors Guild Selects 75 Best Edited Films of All Time

4 February 2015 8:26 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Now this is a list that could result in a lot of fascinating dissection and thanks to HitFix it comes to our attention almost three years after it was originally released back in 2012, celebrating the Motion Picture Editors Guild's 75th anniversary. Over at HitFix, Kris Tapley asks, "Is this news to anyone elsec" Um, yes, I find it immensely interesting and a perfect starting point for anyone looking to further explore the art of film editing. In an accompanying article we get the particulars concerning what films were eligible and how films were to be considered: In our Jan-feb 12 issue, we asked Guild members to vote on what they consider to be the Best Edited Films of all time. Any feature-length film from any country in the world was eligible. And by "Best Edited," we explained, we didn't just mean picture; sound, music and mixing were to be considered as well. »

- Brad Brevet

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What is the best-edited film of all time according to those who do the job?

3 February 2015 8:43 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A random bit of researching on a Tuesday night led me to something I didn't know existed: The Motion Picture Editors Guild's list of the 75 best-edited films of all time. It was a feature in part celebrating the Guild's 75th anniversary in 2012. Is this news to anyone else? I confess to having missed it entirely. Naturally, I had to dig in. What was immediately striking to me about the list — which was decided upon by the Guild membership and, per instruction, was considered in terms of picture and sound editorial as opposed to just the former — was the most popular decade ranking. Naturally, the 1970s led with 17 mentions, but right on its heels was the 1990s. I wouldn't have expected that but I happen to agree with the assessment. Thelma Schoonmaker's work on "Raging Bull" came out on top, an objectively difficult choice to dispute, really. It was so transformative, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Stanley Kubrick, Legendary Director

1 February 2015 5:31 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The works of Stanley Kubrick have changed film making forever. They have stood the test of time and only become more important and impactful as they age. For these reasons, we honor the legendary director and his most sucessful films.

In each genre of art there are certain individuals whose works transcend the eras of their creation to become something more than just art. These pioneers of culture push the boundaries of their respective crafts to deliver masterpieces that are truly timeless. Often times the true impact of their work is not properly recognized until many years after their work is released. Stanley Kubrick is one of these rare individuals. In the craft of making film, Kubrick was a visionary ahead of his time and on the leading edge of pop culture trends that helped define humanity in the 20th century. His abilities and talents as director, in particular, changed »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Here are the Films That Inspired This Year's Sundance Filmmakers, from 'Amadeus' and 'Fargo' to 'Booty Call'

31 January 2015 11:01 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Prior to the Sundance Film Festival 2015, we sent out questionnaires to filmmakers with films in competition, asking them which films inspired them. The films they chose ranged from classics such as "The 400 Blows" and "A Clockwork Orange" to recent releases such as "Listen Up Phillip" and "Ida." Many also named dark comedies, including "Happiness" and "Inside Llewyn Davis." Some filmmakers listed television shows which inspire them including "Louie," "Transparent" and "The Wire." Here are the filmmaker's responses: James Ponsoldt ("The End of the Tour"):"California Split," "The American Friend," "Withnail & I," "Amadeus," "The Hours and Times," "Don't Look Back," "Fat City," "The Social Network," "Midnight Cowboy," "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot," "Happy Together" and »

- Jena Keahon

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

30. Sense and Sensibility

Directed by: Ang Lee

Ang Lee has gone in about eight different directions in terms of genre. His resume includes “The Ice Storm,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” Hulk,” “Brokeback Mountain,” “Life of Pi,” and this delightful Jane Austen adaptation, starring Emma Thompson, Hugh Grant, Alan Rickman, and young Kate Winslet. “Sense and Sensibility” took home the Oscar for Adapted Screenplay for the story of the Dashwood family, a mother widowed and left in difficult circumstances after her husband has left his fortune to his first wife, instead of his current one. So Mrs. Dashwood (Gemma Jones) and her daughters Fanny, Marianne, and Elinor (Harriet Walter, Winslet, Thompson) have to find a way to survive in a world ruled by men and the rules that seem to create obstacle after obstacle for them. Unfortunately, given the era, they are viewed as “unmarryable,” since they have no fortune and no prospects. »

- Joshua Gaul

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Walk of Fame Honor: Ray Dolby Changed the World’s Soundtrack

22 January 2015 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ray Dolby wasn’t the only person to have had a life-altering “ah-ha” moment while traveling in India.

But his, which came in the early 1960s while listening to scratchy recordings he’d made, may be one of the few that altered the soundtrack of the world. On Jan. 22 Dolby will be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Dolby’s epiphany was that he could reduce the noise inherent on analog tape without degrading the recorded signal. He turned that revelation into the Dolby noise reduction system, which debuted for pro audio recording in 1966.

Over the past 50 years, that single-channel technology has grown from mono to stereo to surround to immersive, and today it’s used on the vast majority of entertainment.

See Also: Ray Dolby’s Legacy Lives On In Dolby Labs’ Approach

“At the heart of each of those steps is a Ray Dolby invention, »

- David John Farinella

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Walk of Fame Honor: Ray Dolby Changed the World’s Soundtrack

22 January 2015 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ray Dolby wasn’t the only person to have had a life-altering “ah-ha” moment while traveling in India.

But his, which came in the early 1960s while listening to scratchy recordings he’d made, may be one of the few that altered the soundtrack of the world. On Jan. 22 Dolby will be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Dolby’s epiphany was that he could reduce the noise inherent on analog tape without degrading the recorded signal. He turned that revelation into the Dolby noise reduction system, which debuted for pro audio recording in 1966.

Over the past 50 years, that single-channel technology has grown from mono to stereo to surround to immersive, and today it’s used on the vast majority of entertainment.

See Also: Ray Dolby’s Legacy Lives On In Dolby Labs’ Approach

“At the heart of each of those steps is a Ray Dolby invention, »

- David John Farinella

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R100 | Review

21 January 2015 7:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Joy Pain Club: Matsumoto’s Latest Insistent Weirdness Uneven

After his delightful if belabored 2007 debut Big Man Japan put him on the map, director Hitoshi Matsumoto returns with another slice of strangeness with R100, an S&M inspired fever dream of alternate realities that’s not quite as compelling as it is confounding. Drug fueled hallucinations, secret clubs and leather harnessed vixens abound, but this is more Rihanna’s style of S&M, teasingly vague rather than titillating or sinister. Fans of Matsumoto are likely to be reeled in, but inexplicable twists and turns aggravate its intermittent flashes of interest.

A beautiful woman, possibly a prostitute, applies make-up while she lazily smokes a cigarette as she readies herself for a meeting with Takafumi Katayma (Nao Ohmori), who we assume to be her potential client. A strange conversation devolves quickly into sudden violence, pushing the conflict into the streets. Soon after, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Page 2: Star Wars, Predator, Harry Potter, A Clockwork Orange, Strange Magic, Harvey Weinstein, Sherlock

19 January 2015 1:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 36 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. Header Photo: Eric Tan’s Star Wars art The […]

The post Page 2: Star Wars, Predator, Harry Potter, A Clockwork Orange, Strange Magic, Harvey Weinstein, Sherlock appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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Watch: 'A Clockwork Orange' Gets Recreated in 'Grand Theft Auto V'

14 January 2015 3:37 PM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Awhile back, we featured a cool little project done by some cinephiles and video games fans where they used Grand Theft Auto V to recreate the motorcycle and semi-truck chase scene from Terminator 2: Judgment Day. That kind of idea is a no-brainer since the game is known for stealing cars and vehicular mayhem. But did you ever think that someone would take the time to recreate some scenes from Stanley Kubrick's wild 1971 classic A Clockwork Orange using the Rockstar Games production? Well, that's exactly what GTA Series Videos has done with the use of some editing and a PlayStation 4. Watch below! Here's the Grand Theft Auto V version of A Clockwork Orange from GTA Series Videos (via The Playlist): If you go watch the actual scene, you'll see that this is a pretty meticulous recreation of these scenes in the film, at least as far as Grand Theft Auto V would allow. »

- Ethan Anderton

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Watch: Scenes From Stanley Kubrick's 'A Clockwork Orange' Get 'Grand Theft Auto V' Treatment

14 January 2015 10:32 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Nothing says “a bit of the old ultra violence” like Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 masterpiece, “A Clockwork Orange” although Rockstar Games’ “Grand Theft Auto” videogame series comes close. And now, thanks to GTA Series Videos, we have a perfect mash-up of both. Painstakingly recorded on next gen gaming system PlayStation 4, the six minute video recreates some of the most iconic and memorable scenes from the film as a “Grand Theft Auto V” video. In it, Alex —whose dialogue is still voiced by Malcolm McDowell— and his droogs rain their own special brand of terror down upon the hapless citizens who happen to cross their paths, and then upon one another. The final couple minutes of the video recreates the scene in which Alex lashes out against the other droogs. “As we walked along the flatblock marina, I was calm on the outside, but thinking all the time. So now it was to be Georgie the general, »

- Zach Hollwedel

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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