A Clockwork Orange
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 47 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Camp Dread Reminds Us of Wonderful Summers Past

13 hours ago | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The clean, crisp air; the smell of the campfire; the call of nature. (Wait! What?) Yes, those are all wonderful things we associate with summer camp. A time for young people to venture out on their own and have experiences they'll remember for the rest of their lives... even if that's only about another 25 minutes.

The upcoming film Camp Dread, starring Eric Roberts, rekindles all those great memories of summer camp horror movies past, and oh, how we love them.

After becoming the setting of some truly memorable films in the 80's, summer camp has forever been tagged as the perfect hunting ground for the slasher. It's secluded, it's quiet, and it's filled with poorly supervised camp residents and camp counselors. Is there a more perfect recipe for a bloody good time than that? I think not!

So where do we start? Of course with the counselors. Oh those irresponsible, »

- Scott Hallam

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Stand Alone with Michael Moore

7 April 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Michael Moore at First Time Fest Stand Alone: "And the other film I saw at that time was a film made with Barbie Dolls. It's called Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michael Moore in a seated Stand Alone with Director of Programming David Schwartz discussed how he got into filmmaking through his immersion in the cinema of Akira Kurosawa, Ingmar Bergman, François Truffaut, Federico Fellini and sneaking in to see Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange.

David Schwartz to Michael Moore: "And Kubrick? You said Clockwork Orange was a favorite." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

This year's First Time Fest First Exposure series includes Julie Taymor's Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins, Jessica Lange, Alan Cumming - Salesman directed by Charlotte Zwerin, Albert and David Maysles - James Toback's Fingers starring Harvey Keitel - David Lynch's Eraserhead with Dp Frederick Elmes in person - Kelly Reichardt's River Of Grass »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Definitive Religious Movies: 30-21

6 April 2014 9:43 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

What makes films about religion so interesting is the way some manage to tread a line between support and criticism, while some are vehemently anti-religion or pro-religion. When all is said and done, it’s up to the audience to decide whether or not the film (or the faith portrayed) is a respectful or perceptive study on faith and the dogmatic principles that may or may not surround it. Not every religious film is uplifting. In fact, there are plenty of non-religious films that do a better job of building viewers’ faith. But that’s another list for another time.

30. Beyond the Hills (2012)

Directed by Cristian Mingiu

Five years after his punishing 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Christian Mingiu delivered an interesting look at a lifelong friendship formed at an orphanage. Beyond the Hills tells the story of two women, based on non-fiction novels by Tatiana Niculescu Bran: Alina (Cristina Flutur) has fled to Germany, »

- Joshua Gaul

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Icons and Friends Bring You: Our Favorite Genre Film Scores!!

5 April 2014 8:02 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Howdy fright fiends! All of us here at Icons of Fright are pretty hardcore when it comes to being soundtrack fanatics. Whether it be Rob or Justin blasting away with their Death Waltz vinyl, or little ol’ me (Jerry), sorting through my insane amount of iTunes soundtracks or Mondo vinyl collection, the fact is that we’re constantly in adoration of all things music, especially when the tunes are from our favorite fright films. Since this whole month of April is one big celebration of our ten year anniversary, and we wanted to make things really fun, we decided that instead of just writing an article about Our favorite soundtracks, we would reach out to our friends and colleagues and ask them to join up and contribute to this one. So, without further ado, we bring you Icons and Friends: Our Favorite Genre Film Scores!

 

Rob G. (Co-creator, Icons Of Fright, »

- Jerry Smith

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Six of The Best Literary Adaptations

4 April 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

If you’re a fan of literary adaptations then no doubt you’ll currently have your head stuck in a copy of Joyce Maynard’s emotional coming-of-age novel Labor Day, Nick Hornby’s heart-warming suicide drama A Long Way Down, or maybe even Veronica Roth’s debut dystopian Divergent. What we’re looking forward to most, however, is Richard Ayoade’s upcoming adaptation of Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s dark comedy novella, The Double. With an adapted screenplay written by Ayoade himself alongside fellow scribe Avi Korine, this is his first film since the hugely successful Submarine.

Starring Jesse Eisenberg and Mia Wasikowska as the two leads, the story follows a man driven insane after finding out his life and identity is being assumed by a doppelgänger. The original novella was released in 1846, subtitled “A Petersburg Poem” it showed the surreal and grotesque influences of fellow Russian novelist Nikolai Gogol, »

- Charlie Derry

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The Definitive Kubrickian Films: 10-1

31 March 2014 9:55 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

What’s difficult about making this list is finding a balance between a successful Kubrickian film that either predates or pays homage to Kubrick and, for lack of a better term, is a ripoff. Now that we’ve hit the apex, it’s clear that these are, regardless of influence, quality films. What sets them apart is their ability to evoke Kubrick’s greatness (or inspire it), while delivering a stand-alone masterpiece. If Kubrick took the helm for any of these films, the result wouldn’t delineate too much. Still. Kubrick is a genius because he always kept us guessing.

courtesy of theweeklings.com

10. Fitzcarraldo (1982)

Directed by Werner Herzog

What makes it Kubrickian? It’s a film about extreme obsession and the unreasonable lengths a man will go to when consumed by it. Fitzcarraldo is the story of Brian Sweeny “Fitzcarraldo” Fitzgerald (Klaus Kinski) and his entry into the rubber industry. »

- Joshua Gaul

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Dom Hemingway | Review

31 March 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Vacant Domicile: Shepard’s Latest Hides Absence of Narrative Behind Titular Character

As foul mouthed and over-the-top as it sometimes tends to be, Richard Sheperd’s latest, Dom Hemingway falls a bit short absurd glory, considering the balls out bravado it promises prior to the opening credits. While it features perhaps one of the best performances of Jude Law’s career, its raunchy energy fizzles out by the mid-point as it switches gears from uneasy gangster flick to family dramedy. That’s not say it isn’t without merit, as even though the plot can’t get it together, Shepherd’s got a knack for engaging dialogue and entertaining characterization, something the film tends to bank on a bit too broadly.

Loud, onerous and with a tendency to spew curse word laden diatribes like an acolyte of Tom Hardy’s Bronson character, Dom Hemingway (Law) has just been released from »

- Nicholas Bell

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Stanley Kubrick's Longtime Producer Trashes 'Room 237' and Lists 'Eyes Wide Shut' As His Favorite Kubrick Film

31 March 2014 7:51 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jan Harlan acted as a researcher and producer for director Stanley Kubrick for over thirty years, contributing to such iconic films as "A Clockwork Orange," "Barry Lyndon," "The Shining," "Full Metal Jacket" and "Eyes Wide Shut." Harlan is one of three jury members on the docket of this year's Bermuda International Film Festival, which began on March 21. Last week, Biff hosted a panel discussion featuring Harlan as the main subject where he discussed the art of filmmaking for festival attendees, filmmakers and students.Before the panel, Harlan sat down with Indiewire to discuss his work with Kubrick, including the in-depth exhibit that he's helped put together, and to offer some advice to young filmmakers. Check out the accompanying video of the panel after the text Q&A for more insights from Harlan. Tell me about how you first started working with Stanley Kubrick.I have known Kubrick since I was at school. »

- Casey Cipriani

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Kubrick’s Films and Their Relationship to Violence in Society

27 March 2014 8:43 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A Clockwork Orange

Over the course of his career, legendary filmmaker Stanley Kubrick made movies in various genres tackling a number of ideas. Entirely separate films have been made simply to document the various interpretations of just one of his films, and his attention to detail has been well-documented. Thus, a look at the themes Kubrick presents in his film has always been an intriguing proposition. In three of Kubrick’s films, A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket, and 2001: A Space Odyssey, a major idea that Kubrick draws on is society’s relationship with violence; specifically, that society encourages and promotes violence, punishing its absence, despite its outward condemnation of violent acts.

Take, for example, the story of A Clockwork Orange’s Alex. A violent individual with no concern for the well-being of others, Alex has no issue attacking even his own droogs if he feels the need. His »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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The HeyUGuys Instant Watching Guide – March 24th 2014

24 March 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Not much to speak of in the pre-amble this week except that From Dusk Till Dawn episode 2 on Netflix continued in fine form and presented an interesting and somewhat unique version of a vampire which was actually quite scary. If you have written this off because it sounds cheap and forced (admittedly on paper it does) I urge you to give it a watch, the dialogue alone is better than most TV shows, “Got your balls on?” is a great line I will repeat ad nauseam henceforth.

In other news Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has criticised internet providers for not providing a good enough service to allow users to use Netflix to its full potential and the costs of maintaining such a connection, mainly what ISPs are expecting streaming companies to pay them. This has also kicked off a debate about net neutrality which I know little about. I believe »

- Chris Holt

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Starred Up review – a powerful prison drama that pits father against son | Mark Kermode

23 March 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jack O'Connell gives an electrifying performance as a violent teenager forced to confront parental authority in prison

When inspirational director Alan Clarke cooked up an authentic television portrait of incarcerated British youth in the late 1970s, the resultant film was so alarming that it was promptly banned by the BBC. Clarke subsequently remade Scum for the cinema, and both the small- and big-screen versions of his most notorious work have since cast long shadows over their respective mediums. Plaudits, then, to David Mackenzie for fashioning a tough but empathetic (if uneven) prison drama which marks out its own territory in an arena in which Clarke's epochal work is still the daddy, even now.

Shot (but not set) in Northern Ireland on a tight schedule and even tighter budget, this eye-catching and frequently pulse-pounding drama finds high-risk young offender Eric (Jack O'Connell) being moved up to an adult prison where he »

- Mark Kermode

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The “One-Point Perspective” in Stanley Kubrick’s Work

21 March 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

We’ve been on a bit of a Kubrick kick lately, and here’s another tidbit to add to the heap. Dubbed “one-point perspective,” the above video showcases the symmetrical framing — often from a down-the-corridor Pov — in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket, Barry Lyndon, Eyes Wide Shut and Paths of Glory. Set, for dramatic effect, to Clint Mansell’s “Lux Aeterna,” the collage demonstrates the versatility of the shot, as it adopts a humorous stance (Alex DeLarge slurping spaghetti) and a one filled with dread (Jack Torrance, the twins). »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Stanley Kubrick: Studio Auteur

19 March 2014 5:07 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the 1960s-early 1970s, a combination of financial desperation, creative daring, and an adventurous movie-going public had produced a creative detonation in mainstream American movies not seen before or since.  Each year of the period seemed to bring at least one mightily ambitious visual experiment by a new contributor to the commercial movie scene, the “look” of that effort being as much a part of its identity as its characters and story.  One could pick no better representative of the trend than Stanley Kubrick, for no director of the time so extended the boundaries of mainstream commercial filmmaking, or what it meant to be a mainstream commercial filmmaker.

For the most part, Kubrick’s professional ascent was built on the taking of standard genres – the war story, science fiction tale, sword-and-sandal epic – and twisting them into shapes so singular that each Kubrick outing became an acknowledged one-of-a-kind classic.  Paths of Glory »

- Bill Mesce

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The Definitive Kubrickian Films: 20-11

19 March 2014 10:53 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

My first real attempt at understanding the brilliance that was Stanley Kubrick came in my freshman year of college, when I wrote a research paper on 2001: A Space Odyssey for an English class. After all that work, I only received a B and found myself more confused than ever. But there it was – the spark that Stanley Kubrick’s work produces. Kubrick’s best films were experiences; it’s impossible to “half-watch” one of his many masterpieces. And that’s what the movies on this list do. They take you on an odyssey of visual wonder, psychological tremors, and expect you to do as much work as the people involved in the making of the films. Yet, in the end, Kubrick’s films didn’t feel like homework. They felt like vacations to a world where deep thought is a welcome respite.

20. The Thin Red Line (1998)

Directed by Terrence Malick

What makes it Kubrickian? »

- Joshua Gaul

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Jonathan Glazer: 10 stunning music videos and ads from Under the Skin director

13 March 2014 2:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jonathan Glazer returns to the big screen this week with Under the Skin, his first film since 2004's Birth and only his third feature in total having broken through with Sexy Beast in 2000.

Under the Skin review: Scarlett Johansson haunts in mesmerising sci-fi

Starring Scarlett Johansson, Under the Skin is an eerie, unsettling science fiction story about an alien in female form who ensnares hitchhikers in Scotland. It's a film of striking visual and sonic beauty - no surprise considering Glazer cut his directorial teeth on ads and music videos.

Digital Spy takes a look back - in chronological order - at some of Glazer's best work outside of the feature film world below. If proof were needed that he needs to direct more movies, this is it.

Massive Attack - 'Karmacoma' (1995)

The video that gave Glazer his big break in music promos, here events unfold predominantly in a hotel »

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Jonathan Glazer: 10 stunning music videos and ads from Under the Skin director

13 March 2014 2:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jonathan Glazer returns to the big screen this week with Under the Skin, his first film since 2004's Birth and only his third feature in total having broken through with Sexy Beast in 2000.

Under the Skin review: Scarlett Johansson haunts in mesmerising sci-fi

Starring Scarlett Johansson, Under the Skin is an eerie, unsettling science fiction story about an alien in female form who ensnares hitchhikers in Scotland. It's a film of striking visual and sonic beauty - no surprise considering Glazer cut his directorial teeth on ads and music videos.

Digital Spy takes a look back - in chronological order - at some of Glazer's best work outside of the feature film world below. If proof were needed that he needs to direct more movies, this is it.

Massive Attack - 'Karmacoma' (1995)

The video that gave Glazer his big break in music promos, here events unfold predominantly in a hotel »

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The Definitive Kubrickian Films: 30-21

11 March 2014 9:51 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The difficulty in counting down films so clearly influenced by Kubrick is that there are certain directors who are just tailor-made for it. So, you start to run into situations like this section of the list, where two directors have two films and two other directors had a film mentioned in the last section. But that’s the way it goes. Much of Kubrick’s style isn’t reflected in the work of, say, Todd Phillips. Or Todd Haynes, for that matter.

30. Inception (2010)

Directed by Christopher Nolan

What makes it Kubrickian? As directors go, few rival the sense of complete control over his films like Christopher Nolan, famous for his obsessive attention to detail, much like Kubrick. With Inception, Nolan dialed up the control, creating multiple worlds set within dream landscapes, painting incredibly stunning shots and moments. Focusing on Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his team of dream surveyors, Inception is »

- Joshua Gaul

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Mischief Night Trailer Released

11 March 2014 8:33 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A different film from the Mischief Night that was recently released by Image Entertainment, After Dark Original’s Mischief Night features Malcolm McDowell and will be released to DVD and digital services in May. Here’s a look at the new trailer for the movie:

“The seventh film in the After Dark Originals 2 series brings home the twisted tale, Mischief Night, arriving on DVD (plus Digital UltraViolet), Digital HD and Video on Demand May 20 from Lionsgate Home Entertainment. Starring Brooke Anne Smith (MTV’s “Awkward”), Marc Valera (TV’s “Melrose Place”) and Malcolm McDowell (A Clockwork Orange), Mischief Night follows the unexpected relationship between a predator and his prey the night before All Hallows Eve. The Mischief Night DVD will be available for the suggested retail price of $26.98.

On the night before Halloween, young Kaylie is at work babysitting when she’s warned by a local night watchman not to answer the door, »

- Jonathan James

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Mischievous New Mischief Night Trailer

11 March 2014 7:15 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

After Dark Originals will be releasing the long talked about flick Mischief Night on DVD (plus Digital UltraViolet), Digital HD, and Video on Demand May 20th; but right now we have the first trailer for you! Check it out!

Synopsis:

The seventh film in the After Dark Originals 2 series brings home the twisted tale Mischief Night, arriving on DVD (plus Digital UltraViolet), Digital HD, and Video on Demand May 20 from Lionsgate Home Entertainment.

Starring Brooke Anne Smith (MTV's "Awkward"), Marc Valera (TV's "Melrose Place"), and Malcolm McDowell (A Clockwork Orange), Mischief Night follows the unexpected relationship between a predator and his prey the night before All Hallows Eve. The Mischief Night DVD will be available for the suggested retail price of $26.98.

On the night before Halloween, young Kaylie is at work babysitting when she's warned by a local night watchman not to answer the door because nothing good can happen on Mischief Night. »

- Uncle Creepy

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A Clockwork Orange: My Original Favorite Film

10 March 2014 9:51 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

“It’s funny how the colors of the real world only seem really real when you viddy them on the screen.”

I had heard about A Clockwork Orange long before I ever saw it. I was maybe 13 or 14 the first time my mother mentioned it to me. She told me about seeing it in the theatre at a young age; her older cousin being later scolded for having taken her. At 15, she had no idea what to make of the “ultraviolence” she had been exposed to. Knowing my mother rarely talked about movies from her childhood, you could say my interest was piqued. She didn’t go into many details, but I wondered how different it could possibly be from some of the violent films I had already seen. At this point, I thought Predator and Commando were the be-all and end-all of onscreen debauchery. I also thought I was ready for anything. »

- Griffin Bell

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 47 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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