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Bunny O'Hare (1971)

GP  |   |  Comedy  |  18 October 1971 (USA)
6.4
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Ratings: 6.4/10 from 586 users  
Reviews: 14 user | 10 critic

Bunny is a penniless widow who blackmails a robber into teaching her the trade. Soon the pair starts a successful crime spree, and the cops aren't turning a blind eye.

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Title: Bunny O'Hare (1971)

Bunny O'Hare (1971) on IMDb 6.4/10

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Bunny O'Hare
...
Bill Green - Gruenwald
...
Lieutenant Greeley
Joan Delaney ...
R.J. Hart
Jay Robinson ...
John C. Rupert
...
Ad
...
Lulu
Robert Foulk ...
Commissioner Dingle
Brayden Linden ...
Frank
Karen Mae Johnson ...
Lola (as Karen Rae Johnson)
Francis R. Cody ...
Rhett (as Francis Cody)
Darra Lyn Tobin ...
Elvira (as Darra Lynn Tobin)
Hank Whickham ...
Speed
J. Rob Jordan ...
Officer Nerdman
Herb Marlis ...
Lloyd
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Storyline

Bunny is a penniless widow who blackmails a robber into teaching her the trade. Soon the pair starts a successful crime spree, and the cops aren't turning a blind eye.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

ENJOY those 'GOLDEN YEARS' with the most profitable pension plan any sweet little mother ever devised

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

GP | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

18 October 1971 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Bunny und Bill  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The couple's motorcycle, also featured on the poster, is a 250cc Triumph TRW Trophy See more »

Quotes

Bunny O'Hare: [to Bill] I didn't rob the bank for myself. I did it for my kids.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Prime Cut (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

Monday Man
Written by Billy Strange & Keith Roberts
Vocal Performed by The Mike Curb Congregation
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User Reviews

 
Bette and Ernest together again, and it ain't no Catered Affair...It's "Bunny and Clod".
16 November 2002 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

That, of course, is a reference to the first of two films which they did, where Bette spoke with an accent that Meryl Streep would never envy. This second film together, made 15 years after the more well remembered drama, is an obscure action comedy which didn't get enough attention to even rank a nice ad in the New York Times. (Investigating this film, I was stunned to find an ad the size of my thumb nail in microfilmed copies at my local library). Based upon the fact that the two of them were both Oscar Winners and that co-star Jack Cassidy was a popular Broadway performer, this obviously was way even below "B" grade to warrant such lack of publicity. Reviews, of course, were no better. Bette is seen as the opening credits closed pleading with the bank not to forclose on her home. Of course, she can't get a word in edgewise when she contacts her daughter (Reva Rose, who had just come off of playing Lucy in Off-Broadway's "Your a Good Man Charlie Brown") since the phone man disconnects her. When she calls back a second time, the cat is eating her son-in-law's breakfast with the guy sitting right there paying no attention, and the daughter has to rush off. Then, as she is finally getting around to telling her daughter what is going on, a tractor plows the house down. Ernest Borgnine, as the plummer taking out the toilet, offers her a ride to wherever she needs to go, and before he knows it, she has basically become his guest. He tries to get rid of her, but every time he makes an attempt, she some how manages to get back in his trailer. Thanks to a bumpy ride in the back of the trailer, she learns of his past as a bank robber wanted for escaping from prison, and subtly blackmails him into training her on the art of robbing banks. In a rather funny sequence, we see Bette going through all sorts of indignities (running in unglamorous sweats; climbing on monkey bars; and not at all looking like the actress who played all those feisty Warner Brothers heroines in the 30's and 40's.) Even Margo Channing would have never allowed herself to be profiled this way! Noticing a group of hippies protesting the Bank of New Mexico, Davis and Borgnine use their looks to disguise themselves. Nobody seems to notice the lines around Davis's mouth which make it appear she is older, so the local police are on the look-out for young hippies. A funny note about Reva Rose's looks as Bette's daughter; She was a strange choice considering that Ms. Rose is obviously Jewish, and Ms. Davis was obviously not. It's one of those howlingly funny details not considered that make "Bunny O'Hare" comically bad. While John Astin as her son is much more believable (Gomez Addams as Bette's son---how appropriate!), his one-dimentional portrayal seems taken from Dick Shawn's portrayal of Ethel Merman's stupid son in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World". A string of scantilly clad women are on and off as the latest woman in his life, making Astin a cad the writers obviously used to make the point of how children use and depend on their parents too much, no matter what they are going through themselves. Then, there is Jack Cassidy's oh-so-stupid police commisioner. His opening scene giving a speech to his underlings is oh-so-badly written; Cassidy obviously was by this time becoming a caricturature of his off-screen persona, much like John Barrymore many years before. And when he openly sexually harasses the seemingly willing Joan Delaney (as the younger new female cop assigned to help him capture Davis and Borgnine), he just takes the character into dimensions that would have today's film audiences up in arms. Delaney is supposed to be smarter than Cassidy, but her willingness to be used in this way is destructive to her character. And the finale where all four come together is made unbelievable by what occurs. The cops are presented as buffoons, and Davis, using the money she steals to help her worthless children, isn't too bright, either. The very last scene does have a payoff in that aspect, one of the only good developements which happens towards the end.

In the early 1970's, veteran stars (Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Crawford, Kate Hepburn, Olivia DeHavilland, Joan Bennett, and Bette) were all working; Hepburn and Stanwyck pretty much remained unscathed, while Bennett's "Dark Shadows" was still a hit no matter what the critics thought. DeHavilland sensibly took on smaller parts, but Crawford and Davis simply took any leading script they could get their hands on. If there were awards for "Most embarrasing role for a veteran star", Joan Crawford would have won for 1970's "Trog", and Bette would have won for 1971's "Bunny O'Hare". Watch for a chance to laugh at the buffonery which takes 91 minutes to unravel. It's evidence that the old system of Hollywood wasn't too bad, and what was to follow this era of film trash could only get better.


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