The Boy Friend (1971) - News Poster

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‘How to Succeed’ – Take 2

Not so fast Savant — with the help of correspondent input, DVD Savant presents more information on David Swift’s adaptation of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying — correcting and modifying some assumptions in my first review. Don’t worry — it’s good reading.

A Savant article

This is an odd circumstance. I routinely update, modify, correct and de-stupidify DVD Savant reviews, but this time I’m taking a more radical step. In my March 25 coverage of Twilight Time’s Blu-ray of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, I made a big point of the fact that David Swift’s film adaptation had not made many changes. Several songs were dropped, but that would seem the right thing to do considering that the movie wasn’t planned as a Road Show — it’s only 121 minutes in duration and has no break for an intermission. The much missed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Boy Friend

It’s hard to think of a musical that would benefit more from a Blu-ray boost than Ken Russell’s kaleidoscopic all dancing, all singing send-up of theatrical clichés on the music hall stage, circa 1925. We’re just happy that the adorable Twiggy got to be put in a film like this, to be enjoyed forever. The Russell crowd is all aboard, led by Glenda Jackson and Murray Melvin. Gosh!

The Boy Friend

Blu-ray

The Warner Archive Collection

1971 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 136 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Twiggy, Christopher Gable, Max Adrian, Bryan Pringle, Murray Melvin, Moyra Fraser, Georgina Hale, Sally Bryant, Vladek Sheybal, Tommy Tune, Brian Murphy, Graham Armitage, Antonia Ellis, Caryl Little, Glenda Jackson.

Cinematography: David Watkin

Film Editor: Michael Bradsell

Production Design: Tony Walton

Costumes: Shirley Russell

Written by: Ken Russell from the musical by Sandy Wilson

Produced and Directed by: Ken Russell

Some
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Yakuza

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ma Loute (Slack Bay) review - Juliette Binoche goes mesmerically over the top in bizarre seaside comedy

Bruno Dumont, the former high priest of French seriousness, has successfully shifted to slapstick and pratfalls in this crime comedy set during the Belle Époque

Is there a more extraordinary auteur career than that of Bruno Dumont? Having started as one of Europe’s foremost purveyors of extreme cinema and extreme seriousness, he made a startling move to wacky broad comedy, and is handling it as if to the manner born. Now he gives us Ma Loute, or Slack Bay, a macabre pastoral entertainment by the seaside from the belle époque: it’s an old-fashioned provincial comedy with something of Clochemerle, a world in which everyone seems to have drunk their bodyweight in absinthe. There’s also the surreal meta-strangeness of Ken Russell’s version of The Boyfriend.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Theater Review: Can Dames At Sea Work at Battleship Size?

  • Vulture
Theater Review: Can Dames At Sea Work at Battleship Size?
Mathematicians, or theater producers, have determined that the ideal interval separating the emergence of an entertainment genre from its recurrence as a musical spoof is 35 years — about the time it takes for the youngsters who first made the form popular to become oldsters eager to see it sent up. Anyway, that’s the interval that worked for a spate of shows in the ’50s and ’60s that poked fun at material from three decades earlier. The Boy Friend, which introduced Julie Andrews in 1953, parodied Roaring ’20s musicals; Little Mary Sunshine, in 1959, did the same to ’20s operetta. Dames at Sea, which originated Off–Off Broadway in 1966, took a crack at ’30s Warner Bros. musicals, but was different from the others in a way we would now call camp. Instead of sticking close to the presentational style of Busby Berkeley spectaculars like Gold Diggers of 1933, it literally
See full article at Vulture »

Sex Kitten Turned Two-Time Oscar Nominee on TCM Tonight

Ann-Margret movies: From sex kitten to two-time Oscar nominee. Ann-Margret: 'Carnal Knowledge' and 'Tommy' proved that 'sex symbol' was a remarkable actress Ann-Margret, the '60s star who went from sex kitten to respected actress and two-time Oscar nominee, is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 13, '15. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” series, TCM is showing this evening the movies that earned Ann-Margret her Academy Award nods: Mike Nichols' Carnal Knowledge (1971) and Ken Russell's Tommy (1975). Written by Jules Feiffer, and starring Jack Nicholson and Art Garfunkel, the downbeat – some have found it misogynistic; others have praised it for presenting American men as chauvinistic pigs – Carnal Knowledge is one of the precursors of “adult Hollywood moviemaking,” a rare species that, propelled by the success of disparate arthouse fare such as Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious (Yellow) and Costa-Gavras' Z, briefly flourished from
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Jackson Returns! Two-Time Oscar Winner and Former Labour MP to Star in Zola Adaptation

Glenda Jackson: Actress and former Labour MP. Two-time Oscar winner and former Labour MP Glenda Jackson returns to acting Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Glenda Jackson set aside her acting career after becoming a Labour Party MP in 1992. Four years ago, Jackson, who represented the Greater London constituency of Hampstead and Highgate, announced that she would stand down the 2015 general election – which, somewhat controversially, was won by right-wing prime minister David Cameron's Conservative party.[1] The silver lining: following a two-decade-plus break, Glenda Jackson is returning to acting. Now, Jackson isn't – for the time being – returning to acting in front of the camera. The 79-year-old is to be featured in the Radio 4 series Emile Zola: Blood, Sex and Money, described on their website as a “mash-up” adaptation of 20 Emile Zola novels collectively known as "Les Rougon-Macquart."[2] Part 1 of the three-part Radio 4 series will be broadcast daily during an
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Julie Andrews To Attend 2015 Jameson Dublin International Film Festival

  • TheMovieBit
Jameson Dublin International Film Festival is ecstatic to announce that the legendary actress Julie Andrews will be attending two very special events on the closing day of the Festival. Miss Andrews will participate in an unmissable public interview at the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre and will then close the Festival in tremendous style with the gala screening of the Academy Award winning film The Sound of Music in the Savoy Cinema. Miss Andrews has brought elegance, grace and happiness to stage and screen and it is a great honour to welcome her to the Festival to participate in a public interview hosted by Aedin Gormley from RTÉ’s Lyric FM, Movies and Musicals at the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre. Miss Andrews will discuss her extraordinary career from her luminous first appearance on Broadway starring in The Boy Friend; to creating the role of Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady; to
See full article at TheMovieBit »

15 Silly Things That Have Won Golden Globes

  • Hitfix
15 Silly Things That Have Won Golden Globes
No one would accuse the Hollywood Foreign Press Association of being a refined institution, but when you think about the kinds of movies, TV shows, actors, and actresses who've ended up with Golden Globes, it's actually staggering how the HFPA has gotten away with maintaining its image as a must-see event. Drunk people at the dais is, I guess, still a sufficient enough reason to tune in. Let's celebrate today's nominations with a fond look back at some silly things that have won Golden Globes. 1. "Green Card" (Best Motion Picture -- Comedy) What a classic. Nothing says "comedic wonderful good times" like Gerard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell mixing it up in an immigration romcom. Fun fact: My aunt saw this movie in Germany, noticed the reaction of the crowd, and was embarrassed on America's behalf. 2. Twiggy (Best Newcomer of the Year, Actress) I love Twiggy! She was great as a
See full article at Hitfix »

Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Ken Russell’s ‘The Boy Friend’ stands out as a novel, landmark take on musical adaptations

The Boy Friend

Written by Sandy Wilson

Directed and adapted for the screen by Ken Russell

UK, 1971

Ken Russell pictures have a way of sneaking up on you. Many a young and not-so-young filmgoers have experienced a kind of shocked dry heave of wonderment after their first, or even seventh, Ken Russell experience. I recall a young man for whom the joy of first seeing The Devils nearly induced an anxiety attack. Talking in tongues is not altogether unlikely, either.

A maximalist by trade, and always as earnest as he is plain hyper and mocking, Russell’s musicals hold a special, especially cult-worthy place. The Boy Friend, his first musical, stands out as a novel, landmark take on musical adaptations. It stirred Roger Ebert’s more nearsighted of woeful jabs, when he called the camera work “joyless” and compared the film’s star, Twiggy, to “a Hummel figurine titled ‘Malnutrition.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

John Carpenter’s Body Bags Blu-ray Cover Art

  • DailyDead
John Carpenter was working on an anthology horror project at Showtime in the 90′s. It never became a full series, but the first segments were collected together into an anthology horror movie, titled Body Bags. The DVD has out-of-print for a while, but Scream Factory will be giving the movie their Collector’s Edition treatment, releasing a Body Bags Blu-ray / DVD combo pack in November. Here’s a look at the official cover art:

The movie features three main segments, directed by John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper, who also appear in the movie, along with Wes Craven, Sam Raimi, and a number of other genre stars:

Via Blu-ray.com: “Robert Carradine (The Player) and David Naughton (Witchboard II) pump-up for high-octane horror when a satanic serial killer stalks “The Gas Station.” Stacy Keach (False Identity), Deborah Harry (Videodrome) and rock superstar Sheena Eston wig-out in the hair-raising tale of tonsorial terror,
See full article at DailyDead »

John Carpenter’s Body Bags is Coming to Blu-ray

  • DailyDead
Did you know that John Carpenter was working on an anthology horror project at Showtime in the 90′s? It never became a full series, but the first segments were collected together into an anthology horror movie, titled Body Bags. The DVD has out-of-print for a while, but Scream Factory announced that they will be adding it to their Blu-ray selection.

The movie features three main segments, directed by John Carpenter and Tobe Hooper, who also appear in the movie, along with Wes Craven, Sam Raimi, and a number of other genre icons/stars:

Via Blu-ray.com: “Robert Carradine (The Player) and David Naughton (Witchboard II) pump-up for high-octane horror when a satanic serial killer stalks “The Gas Station.” Stacy Keach (False Identity), Deborah Harry (Videodrome) and rock superstar Sheena Eston wig-out in the hair-raising tale of tonsorial terror, “Hair.” And special guest director Tobe Hooper (Poltergeist) takes the reins when
See full article at DailyDead »

Philip Jenkinson obituary

Presenter of the BBC's Late Night Line-Up and Film Night, he was a wildly enthusiastic historian of the cinema

The broadcaster, journalist and film collector Philip Jenkinson, who has died aged 76, was for a few years one of the most popular and familiar faces on British television. His ubiquity was such that the Monty Python team saw fit to satirise him as a machine-gunned victim in a spoof on Sam Peckinpah's movies. He was also enrolled into that hall of fame accorded to guests of the Morecambe and Wise show. In a 1977 Christmas special, he and a gaggle of co-presenters, all dressed in sailor suits, performed There Is Nothing Like a Dame.

Such celebrity might not have come his way had he not been noticed, in 1967, by the BBC producer Mike Appleton, who attended a film lecture given by Jenkinson at St Martin's School of Art, in London.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Philip Jenkinson obituary

Presenter of the BBC's Late Night Line-Up and Film Night, he was a wildly enthusiastic historian of the cinema

The broadcaster, journalist and film collector Philip Jenkinson, who has died aged 76, was for a few years one of the most popular and familiar faces on British television. His ubiquity was such that the Monty Python team saw fit to satirise him as a machine-gunned victim in a spoof on Sam Peckinpah's movies. He was also enrolled into that hall of fame accorded to guests of the Morecambe and Wise show. In a 1977 Christmas special, he and a gaggle of co-presenters, all dressed in sailor suits, performed There Is Nothing Like a Dame.

Such celebrity might not have come his way had he not been noticed, in 1967, by the BBC producer Mike Appleton, who attended a film lecture given by Jenkinson at St Martin's School of Art, in London.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Paula Poundstone Photo: Art Directors Guild Awards 2012

Paula Poundstone Comedian Paula Poundstone acted as host of the Art Directors Guild Awards last Saturday at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, while Adg president Thomas A. Walsh presided over the awards ceremony and 65-year-old Ben Vereen (Funny Lady, All That Jazz) performed as a "special musical guest." That was Poundstone's third consecutive gig at the Adg Awards. [Full list of 2012 Art Directors Guild winners and nominees.] Presenters at the ceremony included Ed Asner (Mary Tyler Moore, Lou Grant), Alexandra Breckenridge (American Horror Story), Miranda Cosgrove (iCarly), 1996 Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee James Cromwell (Babe, The Artist), Melanie Lynskey (Up in the Air), Penelope Ann Miller (Chaplin, The Artist), Kevin McHale (Glee), 2012 Best Actor Oscar nominee Gary Oldman (Prick Up Your Ears, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), Vinessa Shaw (3:10 to Yuma), and Max Greenfield (New Girl). Among the evening's award winners were Dante Ferretti for Martin Scorsese's Hugo, Stuart Craig for David Yates' Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2, Hugo: Art Directors Guild Winners

Martin Scorsese's Hugo (period film), David Yates' Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (fantasy film), and David Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (contemporary film) were the feature-film winners at the Art Directors Guild's 16th Excellence in Production Design Awards, held this evening at the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. The respective production design winners were Dante Ferretti (photo), Stuart Craig, and Donald Graham Burt. [Full list of 2012 Art Directors Guild winners and nominees.] Both Ferretti (with frequent collaborator/set decorator Francesca Lo Schiavo) and Craig (with set decorator Stephenie McMillan ) are in the running for the Best Art Direction Academy Award. Their competitors are Laurence Bennett and set decorator Robert Gould for Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist, Anne Seibel and set decorator Hélène Dubreuil for Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris, and Rick Carter and set decorator Lee Sandales for Steven Spielberg's War Horse. Among the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Andrews To Direct Musical Based On Her Own Children's Book

  • WENN
Andrews To Direct Musical Based On Her Own Children's Book
Julie Andrews has signed on to direct a new musical, based on the children's book she co-wrote with her daughter Emma Walton Hamilton.

The mother-daughter pair penned The Great American Mousical, which contains illustrations by Andrews' ex-husband and Emma's father Tony Walton, back in 2006 and now she's set to stage the theatrical adaptation of the book at the Norma Terris Theater in Chester, Connecticut later this year.

Zina Goldrich and Marcy Heisler will compose the music and lyrics and the choreography will be completed by Tony Award nominee Christopher Gattelli.

The Sound of Music veteran tells BroadwayWorld.com, "Emma, Tony and I had so much fun working on this book and are now overjoyed that it will come alive on the stage. I'm so blessed to be working with this creative team in adapting our book for the theatre."

The show is set to open on 8 November and run through 2 December.

The play marks the star's second turn at directing - Andrews previously oversaw a revival of The Boy Friend at the Goodspeed Opera House in Connecticut in 2005.

The Story of Musicals has its high notes

The BBC4 series is better on anecdotes than ideas, so it's at its best when it stops drum-beating and deals with specifics

Catch up with The Story of Musicals on iPlayer

I'm enjoying BBC4's series, The Story of Musicals, but I could do without the note of chauvinist triumphalism. Each segment begins with a brag about the way the British musical overcame American domination. Every time I hear that, I am reminded of something written by the American critic, Robert Brustein, on hearing Trevor Nunn accept a Tony Award for Cats with the remark: "All I can do is purr." Brustein acidly commented that he felt not so much that the British had conquered Broadway as that Broadway had totally debauched the British.

The TV series is at its best when it stops drum-beating and deals with specifics. There was a wonderful story told by Sandy Wilson in the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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