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And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) Poster

Trivia

The deadly joke that is used to kill Germans in World War II is translated to this in plain language: "If that is git only stucco and Slotermeyer? Yes! Celebration dog that or the Flipperwaldt gersput!"
When Terry Gilliam asked British animation legend Bob Godfrey if he could use his camera to recreate his animated sequences for the movie, Godfrey didn't know who Gilliam was and told him to "bugger off". Later, Godfrey found out that Gilliam was a member of the Monty Python team and helped him complete the sequences for the movie.
Dual currency is shown during the film (as seen on the supermarket adverts - 9np or 1/9). This was common for UK films of the early seventies as the country was decimalising its currency from pounds, shillings and pence (20 shillings to the pound, 12d (pence or pennies) to the shilling) to pounds and what were at the time referred to as 'new pence' (100p to the pound).
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The movie was filmed between the first and second seasons of Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969). This feature film contains several sketches that had been written for the second season but not as yet performed, including the "Hungarian Phrasebook" sketch.
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The sets for this film were built in an abandoned dairy rather than on a (more costly) soundstage.
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Debut theatrical feature film of English comedy ensemble Monty Python. This cinema movie was intended to introduce American audiences to Monty Python's comedy, but ironically, it did far better business in Britain, where viewers had already seen the movie's sketches on Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969).
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According to Terry Gilliam, executive producer Victor Lownes, who primarily represented Playboy magazine (which funded the movie), insisted on getting an animated credit equal in size to those of the group members.
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An obstacle course in the "Upper Class Twit of the Year" scene has the competitors jumping over matchboxes. Vivian Smith-Smythe-Smith is the only one who "refuses" (doesn't jump). In the series, Nigel Incubator-Jones was the one to refuse.
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The movie's production notes state that the film is "a collection of re-filmed sketches from the first and second series of the cult TV comedy show Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969)".
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On British television, it was called "And Now For Something Completely Different". It was considered by viewers and critics as "something different"....something completely different, in fact, to the point where this Columbia Pictures' film version, And Now for Something Completely Different (1971), was as joyously anarchic as its television original.
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The movie's humor reminded producer Patricia Casey of the Keystone Kops: no holds barred, outrageous, preposterous, daredevil, zany, violent fun. Casey said: "It's the kind of thing the English do very well". They're so free, they create a fantastic situation, inject a few serious home truths about sex or pompous attitudes, then tear it down." Producer Patricia Casey, aka Pat Casey, was an American citizen footloose in London and had the time of her life making this movie: "We've nothing to compare with it in the States. It's so brilliantly 'visual' that anybody who enjoys laughing, anywhere in the world, will appreciate it".
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According to the film's production notes, the television show, Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969), and this picture that sprung from it, And Now for Something Completely Different (1971), involved six inspired young late 20s and early 30s zanies responsible for all the writing and most of the performing.
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Monty Python play the hundred or so cameo comedy characters with the help of makeup and wardrobe arid acting talent according to the movie's production notes.
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The characters that Monty Python played in this picture were described as being "demonic, disturbing, devious, delightful and just plain daffy" in the movie's press kit.
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This movie featured the animated cartoons of Terry Gilliam just as the film's precursor television series Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969) did.
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Debut theatrical feature film directed by television director Ian MacNaughton who was also later credited for "filmed sequences" for Monty Python's later sketch comedy concert movie Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982). These two cinema features were the only ever theatrical films of director MacNaughton.
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Apart from the six male dominated performers of Monty Python, two women featured in the movie's cast who were glamorous Carol Cleveland and Minneapolis-born Connie Booth who both appeared to advantage in And Now for Something Completely Different (1971).
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The movie's And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) title was used as a catch-phrase in Monty Python's television series Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969).
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The writing and screenplay credits for the six Monty Python team members billed them for "screen foreplay & conception".
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The number of comic sketches or comedy segments featured in this cinema movie totaled to the number forty-six.
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Between some of the sketch segments in the movie, the announcer (John Cleese) appears briefly saying the recurring line of dialogue, "and now for something completely different", which is the same as the film' s And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) title.
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Many American movie posters for the film declared: "If the motion picture industry dies . . . Monty Python killed it!".
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The number of animated segments in the film totaled to seventeen including the picture's main opening tiles and end closing credits.
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According to an article by John Ezard published in London's The Guardian newspaper on Saturday 8th October 2005, "the line 'And now for something completely different', usually attributed to Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969), was coined with perfect seriousness by someone completely different - the late Christopher Trace, founder-presenter of Blue Peter".
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Famous Monty Python sketches featured in the film include "Hell's Grannies", the "Dead Parrot" sketch, "The Lumberjack Song", the "Upperclass Twits", and the "Nudge Nudge Wink Wink" routine.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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