Trog (1970) - News Poster

(1970)

News

'Feud' Showrunner Explains the Finale's Hopeful Ending

[This story contains spoilers from the season finale of FX's Feud: Bette and Joan.]

All this time they could have been friends.

That was the question FX anthology Feud: Bette and Joan left viewers with when it wrapped its look at the infamous feud between Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) and Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon) during Sunday’s finale.

With production on HushHush, Sweet Charlotte wrapped, the series flashed forward between 1969 and 1978 to showcase Crawford's slow decline as she hit the lowest of lows for her work on the B flick Trog. Meanwhile, Davis took any and every opportunity thrown her...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Feud Finale Recap: Trogs and Ends

Feud Finale Recap: Trogs and Ends
Regrets, they had a few. Quite a few. And by the time Sunday’s Feud: Bette and Joan finale was over, Davis and Crawford had added a couple more to the mountainous list. Read on, and we’ll review the heartbreaking events that led the infamous foes to the end of the rivalry that always should have been a friendship.

RelatedFeud Season 2 to Focus on Charles and Diana’s Royal Estrangement

‘You Can’T Catch Their Eye If You Can’T Catch The Light’ | As “You Mean All This Time We Could Have Been Friends?” began, Pauline was recalling
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Will ‘Lean Into the Pain’ of Aging Actresses in Hollywood

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Will ‘Lean Into the Pain’ of Aging Actresses in Hollywood
Feud: Bette and Joan” may focus on two of Hollywood’s most glamorous stars, but it also highlights the struggle that actresses have trying to find work as they age into an industry that favors the young.

At the Television Critics Association panel for the series on Thursday, creator Ryan Murphy acknowledged that despite the campier aspects of the feud between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford and their collaboration on “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” the series would also focus on the more emotional aspects of the women’s lives.

Read More: ‘American Crime Story,’ ‘Atlanta’ Delays; Why FX Hits Sometimes Go on Long Hiatuses

He wanted to “lean into the pain and talk about the tragedy of their lives” and how they were “mistreated in the end.” After “Baby Jane,” both acclaimed actresses struggled to find compelling work. Crawford ended her career with the science fiction-horror film “Trog,
See full article at Indiewire »

Max Rose -Review

“Heavenly shades of night are falling…it’s twilight time”, and we’re not talking about sparkly teen vampires. No, those lyrics from the Platters golden oldie could very well be used as the theme for this movie, and perhaps its iconic lead actor. As many “golden age” film stars reach their “golden years”, they often look toward a project that may be the perfect coda to their long career, maybe a farewell to their screen persona. Hey wouldn’t you rather ride into the sunset with The Shootist (as John Wayne did) than headline a flick called Trog ( Joan Crawford’s finale’)? Perhaps this is the case for fabled film funny man Jerry Lewis. At the tail end of the “golden age” of Hollywood (1948), he and then partner Dean Martin ruled the box office for eight years. After their split, Jerry had even greater success as a solo for a good twelve years,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

May 17th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include The Witch, Southbound, I Saw What You Did (1965)

For those of you looking to live a bit more deliciously, May 17th is certainly going to be your day, because Robert EggersThe Witch is finally making its way onto Blu-ray and DVD this Tuesday. Scream Factory also has two releases that genre fans will certainly want to keep an eye on this week: William Castle’s cult classic I Saw What You Did and the recent thriller Dementia, which stars The Sacrament’s Gene Jones. The killer anthology Southbound is also coming to DVD on Tuesday, and Universal has several four-title collections that might be worth your time as well.

I Saw What You Did (Scream Factory, Blu-ray)

A simple prank call turns into a night of person-to-person terror in I Saw What You Did, a movie that dials up the suspense.

Teenagers Libby and Kit have found a new way to entertain themselves: by calling
See full article at DailyDead »

Contest: Win I Saw What You Did (1965) on Blu-ray

Two teenagers pick the wrong person to prank call in I Saw What You Did (1965), hitting high-definition on home media this Tuesday from Scream Factory, and we’ve been provided with three Blu-ray copies to give away to Daily Dead readers.

————

Prize Details: (3) Winners will receive (1) Blu-ray copy of I Saw What You Did.

How to Enter: For a chance to win, email contest@dailydead.com with the subject “I Saw What You Did Contest”. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Entry Details: The contest will end at 12:01am Est on May 22nd. This contest is only open to those who are eighteen years of age or older that live in the United States. Only one entry per household will be accepted.

————

From the Press Release: “It starts as a game… and there’s no end in Fright! A simple prank call turns into a night
See full article at DailyDead »

I Saw What You Did (1965) Blu-ray Clips & Trailer

Starring Joan Crawford, the Blu-ray release of I Saw What You Did (1965) is around the corner (May 17th), and Scream Factory has released two Blu-ray clips and the official trailer for the film.

From the Press Release: “It starts as a game… and there’s no end in Fright! A simple prank call turns into a night of person-to-person terror in I Saw What You Did, a movie that dials up the heart-stopping suspense! Scream Factory presents the Blu-ray debut of William Castle’s I Saw What You Did on May 17th, 2016, complete with an all-new high definition transfer.

Teenagers Libby and Kit have found a new way to entertain themselves: by calling up random strangers and tormenting them with a warning: “I saw what you did, and I know who you are.” But when a man who has recently murdered his wife becomes their latest victim, the tables are quickly turned…
See full article at DailyDead »

I Saw What You Did Blu-ray Special Features Revealed

Dial “F” for Fright. When two teens prank call a man who, unbeknownst to them, has committed a heinous crime, a night of fun turns into a night of terror. Scream Factory will release William Castle’s I Saw What You Did on Blu-ray with a high-definition transfer on May 17th.

Press Release: It starts as a game… and there’s no end in Fright! A simple prank call turns into a night of person-to-person terror in I Saw What You Did, a movie that dials up the heart-stopping suspense! Scream Factory presents the Blu-ray debut of William Castle’s I Saw What You Did on May 17th, 2016, complete with an all-new high definition transfer.

Teenagers Libby and Kit have found a new way to entertain themselves: by calling up random strangers and tormenting them with a warning: “I saw what you did, and I know who you are.” But
See full article at DailyDead »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tyburn Films: British Horror’s last line of Defence

1976 saw the publication of John Brosnan’s excellent book The Horror People. Written during the summer of 1975, it makes interesting reading 40 years down the line. Those who feature prominently in the book – Peter Cushing, Vincent Price, Jack Arnold, Michael Carreras, Sam Arkoff, Roy Ward Baker, Freddie Francis, Robert Bloch, Richard Matheson and Milton Subotsky – were still alive, as were Ralph Bates, Mario Bava, Jimmy Carreras, John Carradine, Dan Curtis, John Gilling, Robert Fuest, Michael Gough, Val Guest, Ray Milland, Robert Quarry and Michael Ripper, all of whom were given a mention. Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Junior, Michael Reeves and James H Nicholson were not long dead. Hammer, Amicus and American International Pictures were still in existence. George A Romero had yet to achieve his prominence and Stephen King wasn’t even heard of!

Brosnan devoted a chapter to a new British company called Tyburn Films. Founded by the charismatic and ambitious Kevin Francis,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

DVD Release: Route 66: The Complete Series

DVD Release Date: May 22, 2012

Price: DVD $129.99

Studio: Shout! Factory

George Maharis( l.) and Martin Milner get their kicks on Route 66.

Shout! Factory gets its kicks with the release of the 1960 road tip drama television show Route 66: The Complete Series which marks the first time all four seasons of the show have been issued as one set.

Created by Academy Award-winning writer Stirling Silliphant and producer Herbert Leonard, Route 66 follow the lives of two young men: Yale graduate Tod Stiles (Martin Milner, TV’s Adam-12), an intellectual who has led a privileged and sheltered life, and Buz Murdock (George Maharis, TV’s The Most Deadly Game), a tough young man raised in “Hell’s Kitchen” who’s been struggling his entire life just to survive. When his wealthy father dies, Tod finds himself unexpectedly penniless with just one possession, a Chevrolet Corvette. On a quest to find
See full article at Disc Dish »

Brisbane 2011 Film Festival – Fantastic Fest Weekend

Following the initially fascinating but ultimate tedium of black-magic mumbo-jumbo Shaw Brothers oddity The Boxer’s Omen (1983) as the highly anticipated ‘Mystery Film’ choice from Fantastic Fest, Sunday evening’s Drive-In Delirium Presents… double bill mash-up was something to get seriously geeked out about.

Ozploitation extraordinarie Mark Hartley (Not Quite Hollywood) and Alamo Drafthouse Cinema’s ‘Weird Wednesday’ programmer Lars Niels presented their film clip compendiums; the first of which, Trailorpalooza, compiled a collection of cult film trailers plucked from the last 50 years and featured some of the most ludicrously over-the-top scenarios ever conceived. What was most surprising however was the calibre of former Hollywood heavy-weights who actually agreed to sign up to such straight-to-the-trash can concepts.

Ray Millard in The Thing with Two Heads – a supposedly humorous transplant tale with a white man/black man splicing that defies definition; Joan Crawford in (what ultimately became her swansong) Trog -
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

British Horror Actor Michael Gough Dead at 94

British cult horror actor Michael Gough has died at the age of 94 after a stellar career playing character roles in over 100 films. Horror fans know him well from his role in the seminal Hammer Horror film Horror Of Dracula (1958) as well as cult goodies such as Horror Hospital, Horrors Of The Black Museum, Legend Of Hell House, and Konga. A younger generation of film fans discovered him when he starred as Alfred the butler in the 90′s Batman franchise and he continued working up to his death, providing voice work for Tim Burton’s The Corpse Bride and last year’s Alice In Wonderland.

From The Daily Telegraph:

Michael Gough, the actor who died on Thursday aged 94, achieved cult status for his roles in the Hammer horror films of the 1960s, but became better known as Alfred the Butler in Tim Burton’s Batman films; he was also an accomplished stage actor,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rest in Peace Film Legend Michael Gough

Today we've lost a true icon. A man who was whipping ass in the film industry longer than most of us have been alive. It is with an extremely heavy heart that we report Michael Gough has passed away at the ripe old age of 94.

The film legend worked up until age 92 and has appeared in dozens of movies throughout his decades long career, including his most celebrated role as Alfred Pennyworth in the original Batman movie franchise launched by Tim Burton. More of his genre-specific credits include Sleepy Hollow, Trog, Konga, The Skull, Horror Hospital, and the still frightening after all of these years The Legend of Hell House.

We here at Dread Central would like to take this time to not only offer our deepest condolences to Michael's friends, family, and constituents but also thank and revere the man for all the movie memories he has given us.
See full article at Dread Central »

Cinematical Seven: Prestige Actors in 'Lowly' Horror Films

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Features, Cinematical

The four-time Oscar nominee Julianne Moore stars in a new horror movie, 'Shelter,' which was supposed to open this week, but -- not too surprisingly -- the Weinsteins are playing their usual chess game and have pulled it from release. Goodness knows we love horror movies, but let's face it: as far as prestige is concerned, they're just a step above the Three Stooges and a step below romantic comedies. Regardless, it got me thinking about all the times that high-profile and respectable actors have taken on jobs such as this. And I'm not talking about high-profile movies, either. Were they interested in the movie's themes? Did they need a paycheck? Who knows?

1. (tie) Bette Davis in 'Wicked Stepmother' (1989) and Joan Crawford in 'Trog' (1970)

Bette Davis was a two-time Oscar winner and Joan Crawford was a one-time winner, and they
See full article at Moviefone »

Cinematical Seven: Prestige Actors in 'Lowly' Horror Films

Cinematical Seven: Prestige Actors in 'Lowly' Horror Films
Filed under: Features, Cinematical

The four-time Oscar nominee Julianne Moore stars in a new horror movie, 'Shelter,' which was supposed to open this week, but -- not too surprisingly -- the Weinsteins are playing their usual chess game and have pulled it from release. Goodness knows we love horror movies, but let's face it: as far as prestige is concerned, they're just a step above the Three Stooges and a step below romantic comedies. Regardless, it got me thinking about all the times that high-profile and respectable actors have taken on jobs such as this. And I'm not talking about high-profile movies, either. Were they interested in the movie's themes? Did they need a paycheck? Who knows?

1. (tie) Bette Davis in 'Wicked Stepmother' (1989) and Joan Crawford in 'Trog' (1970)

Bette Davis was a two-time Oscar winner and Joan Crawford was a one-time winner, and they
See full article at Cinematical »

"Girly", Creepy Erotic British Thriller, Comes To DVD

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Freddie Francis had a long and prosperous career in the cinema, learning many areas of filmmaking by cutting his teeth as a stills photographer, clapper boy, camera loader and focus puller; he also worked on training films while in the army. Garnering enough experience led him to become a camera operator on films as diverse as The Tales of Hoffman (a favorite of George Romero’s and Martin Scorsese’s), Twice Upon a Time, and Beat the Devil. He also worked as a cinematographer on The Innocents, Night Must Fall, The Elephant Man, and Dune, while scoring two Oscars for shooting Sons and Lovers and Glory. In the midst of this, he managed to find time to direct more than his share of thrillers in the 1960’s and 1970’s, chief among them The Brain, Paranoiac, Nightmare, The Evil of Frankenstein, Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors, The Skull,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Seventies Shocker Horror Hospital Coming to DVD

Now this is what we're talking about, man! Long lost movies hitting home video in new pristine prints! The news of another never ceases to get us excited, and now that Horror Hospital is coming home, we're downright feverish!

From the Press Release

Before he played the mild-mannered butler Alfred in Tim Burton’s “Batman” movies, Michael Gough was an icon of horror, appearing in such classics as “Berserk,” “Trog,” and “Horrors of the Black Museum.” But none of his roles can compare to his performance as sadistic and deranged Dr. Christian Storm in Horror Hospital. Director Antony Balch’s legendary 1973 shocker has now been restored to its uncensored glory and will be released on DVD by genre masters Dark Sky Films, via Mpi Media Group, on June 15, 2010. The disc, carrying an Srp of $19.98, includes a new feature-length commentary.

As with many British fright flicks of the ’70s, Horror Hospital pours humor,
See full article at Dread Central »

Best. Gay. Week. Ever. (March 13, 2009)

I Heart Camp! No, Not The Kind With Tents!

I have no taste. That's the general consensus from my friends, who are by turns bewitched, bothered, and bewildered by my obsession with camp, especially when it comes to films and 80's pop culture. Things came to a head last week when I invited some of them to a special screening in my house of the 2006 remake of The Wicker Man. For those unfamiliar with it, here's a clip of some the movie's greatest scenes. Enjoy!

"How'd it get burned? How'd it get burned? How did the Bees in my eyes get Burned?

There is absolutely nothing better than Nic Cage at his most spastic. The Wicker Man had Nic in full looney-tunes mode, along with the most unintentionally hilarious script to come along in many a moon. Plus it also had the great Ellen Burstyn looking like Braveheart's crazy grandma.
See full article at The Backlot »

In the meadow, we can pan a snowman

You better watch out You better not cry You better have clout I'm telling you why Two Thumbs Down are comin' to town He's making a list,

Checking it twice;

Gonna find out whose

movie was scheiss.

Sandy Claws is comin' to town.

He sees you when you're (bleeping),

He knows when you're a fake

He knows if you've been bad or good

So be good for cinema's sake!

With little but scorn

and pounding of drums,

Rooty toot hoots

and rummy tum thumbs

Sandy Jaws is comin' to town

As I dream back over many happy years of movie going, some of my favorite lines from old reviews dance in my head like visions of sugarplums. Good movies, bad movies, doesn't matter, just so the line dances. I thought I'd share them in the holiday spirit. Curiously, most of the lines come from movies so bad I didn't want a refund,
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites