Scrooge (1970) - News Poster

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‘DuckTales’: David Tennant, Danny Pudi, Ben Schwartz Among Voice Cast For Disney Xd Reboot

The voice cast is set for Disney Xd's DuckTales reboot set for premiere this summer. Leading the way in the new version based on the Emmy-winning series are David Tennant as Scrooge McDuck, Danny Pudi, Ben Schwartz and Bobby Moynihan as the voices of mischief-making Huey, Dewey and Louie, respectively, Beck Bennett as Launchpad McQuack, Toks Olagundoye as Mrs. Beakley, and Kate Micucci as Webby Vanderquack. The cast was revealed today in a video (see above) of the actors…
See full article at Deadline TV »

'Captain America: Civil War' Budget to Blame for Marvel Shake-Up

  • MovieWeb
'Captain America: Civil War' Budget to Blame for Marvel Shake-Up
Earlier in the week, it was reported that Marvel is going through a big restructuring, which finally sees Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige being freed from the Emperor like vice-grip of penny-pinching Marvel Entertainment CEO Isaac "Ike" Perlmutter. Now, Kevin Feige will report directly to Disney chief Alan Horn. And while we've heard a few reasons as to why this finally happened, including a recent story that pins the big change on Avengers: Age of Ultron failing to meet expectations at the box office, a new report from THR puts all the blame on something else entirely. According to inside sources, the ballooning budget on Captain America: Civil War is almost entirely to blame for the big Marvel shake-up.

There was reportedly a lot of friction between Kevin Feige and Ike Perlmutter over the budget on Captain America: Civil War, with Perlmutter often described as 'frugal' in the press. The
See full article at MovieWeb »

Spend New Year's Eve with These Genre Films

  • Cinelinx
After diving into all the great Christmas-themed slashers and horror movies like Silent Night, Deadly Night, Santa's Slay, Christmas Evil, Saint Nick, and many others, it’s sometimes hard to believe there’s another great holiday to revel in just around the corner. There might not be as many films directly centered on ushering in the New Year, but there’s plenty to keep you entertained for a few days and nights.

I realize that not everyone smiles in glee like I do as teenagers get axed and knifed. Some folks just want some alternate choices in the face of all the countdowns and variety shows they’re bombarded with every year. The list I’ve put together includes not only slasher and horror flicks, but disaster, sci-fi, and action-oriented ones as well.

“New Year’s Evil” tells the tale of a Punk Rock and New Wave TV show host
See full article at Cinelinx »

Strictly Come Dancing final peaks with 11.4 million viewers

The final of Strictly Come Dancing peaked with more than 11.4 million viewers last night (Saturday, December 20), according to overnight figures.

BBC One's dancing competition managed 11.43m (48.2%) at 7.30pm.

The first part of the final averaged 10.65m (46.4%) from 6.30pm, while the results show - which saw Caroline Flack and Pasha Kovalev lift the glitterball trophy - was watched by 10.21m (42.8%) from 8.50pm.

In between, the latest episode of Atlantis drew 4.74m (21.6%).

On BBC Two, a repeat of Dad's Army entertained 2.53m (11.5%) from 7.55pm. It was followed by Christmas University Challenge and Qi Xl, which garnered 1.79m (7.8%) and 1.07m (4.5%) respectively.

ITV aired Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince from 7pm, which attracted 2.91m (12.6%) and an additional 348k (1.6%) on +1. The Jonathan Ross Show followed with 2.24m (13%).

Channel 4's Rewind the Christmas Hits appealed to 1.21m (5.3%) from 8pm, before Four Christmases was seen by 835k (4.2%).

Channel 5 showed Albert Finney's Scrooge, which managed 725k (3.2%) from 7.55pm.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

10 Ridiculous Holiday Horror Films

TriStar Pictures

Christmastime is a cinephile’s dream. Not only will they have a smorgasboard of memorabilia, Criterion Collection blu-rays and old props from the set of a Jim Jarmusch movie that went for surprisingly little money at auction under their tree come the morning of December 25th, that’ll be the icing on the cake of a whole month of superlative festive films. From It’s A Wonderful Life to Die Hard to A Muppets Christmas Carol (which features both the definitive Scrooge in Michael Caine and the definitive Charles Dickens in Gonzo), the schedules and cinemas are stuffed with classic Christmas films.

Some people’s movie tastes skew a little darker, though. A little bloodier. A little lighter on the festive cheer, a little heavier on the buckets of gore and B-movie production values. Horror film makers don’t miss a trick, though, and having already mined Halloween,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

9 Reasons The Muppet Christmas Carol Should Have Won an Oscar

9 Reasons The Muppet Christmas Carol Should Have Won an Oscar
Unforgiven won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1993. You know what didn't win? The Muppet Christmas Carol! For that, the Academy remains... unforgiven. (Nailed it.)  The Muppet Christmas Carol isn't just a great holiday movie or a great Muppet movie; it's a great piece of classic American cinema. Michael Caine cries real, human tears multiple times, yells, screams, and gives a career-defining performance as Ebenezer Scrooge, and he does all of this while talking to Muppets. Sure Jim Henson wasn't around yet, but we have a feeling Charles Dickens' original intention for this legendary tale was for it to involve frogs, pigs, and whatever Gonzo is. Here's why we...
See full article at E! Online »

Ian Fraser, Music Director, Arranger Who Worked With Julie Andrews, Dies at 81

Ian Fraser, Music Director, Arranger Who Worked With Julie Andrews, Dies at 81
Ian Fraser, whose 11 Emmy Awards and 21 additional nominations made him the most-honored musician in television history, died of complications from cancer Friday morning at his home in Los Angeles. He was 81.

All of Fraser’s Emmy noms and wins were in the music direction category, for supervising and conducting television specials, including 14 of the annual “Christmas in Washington” events over the past 30 years.

Fraser was also in his 10th term as a governor of the Television Academy. He conducted the 1984, 1993 and 2002 Emmy shows, as well as the 1984 Oscar telecast, and served as musical director for many of the TV Academy’s Hall of Fame ceremonies.

He was also nominated for a 1970 Oscar for adapting Leslie Bricusse’s song score for “Scrooge.”

Fraser had long professional relationships with Bricusse as well as with Julie Andrews and with Anthony Newley.

Fraser was born in Hove, England, in 1933, and served in the Royal Artillery band
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Ian Fraser, Music Director, Arranger Who Worked With Julie Andrews, Dies at 81

Ian Fraser, Music Director, Arranger Who Worked With Julie Andrews, Dies at 81
Ian Fraser, whose 11 Emmy Awards and 21 additional nominations made him the most-honored musician in television history, died of complications from cancer Friday morning at his home in Los Angeles. He was 81.

All of Fraser’s Emmy noms and wins were in the music direction category, for supervising and conducting television specials, including 14 of the annual “Christmas in Washington” events over the past 30 years.

Fraser was also in his 10th term as a governor of the Television Academy. He conducted the 1984, 1993 and 2002 Emmy shows, as well as the 1984 Oscar telecast, and served as musical director for many of the TV Academy’s Hall of Fame ceremonies.

He was also nominated for a 1970 Oscar for adapting Leslie Bricusse’s song score for “Scrooge.”

Fraser had long professional relationships with Bricusse as well as with Julie Andrews and with Anthony Newley.

Fraser was born in Hove, England, in 1933, and served in the Royal Artillery band
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oswald Morris obituary

Oscar-winning British cinematographer who worked on a wide range of film classics

The Oscar-winning British cinematographer Oswald Morris, who has died aged 98, will be remembered for many classics, including Moulin Rouge, Fiddler on the Roof, Moby Dick and Lolita. He worked with some of the great directors, John Huston, Sidney Lumet, Carol Reed, Stanley Kubrick and Franco Zeffirelli. Many of Morris's films are landmarks in the history of colour cinematography. For Moulin Rouge (1952) he used filters to create a style reminiscent of paintings by Toulouse-Lautrec. For Fiddler on the Roof (1971), which won him an Oscar, he filmed with a silk stocking over the lens to give a sepia effect.

Morris also shot popular favourites such as The Guns of Navarone (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975), and photographed acting luminaries: Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Gregory Peck and Humphrey Bogart.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Win the classic A Night To Remember on Blu-ray

  • HeyUGuys
To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, ITV Studios Home entertainment has released the classic A Night To Remember on Blu-ray and we are giving you the chance to win one of three copies.

A Night To Remember is the original, Golden Globe winning Titanic masterpiece, digitally re-mastered for audiences to experienced again and again. The film retells the tragedy of the luxury liner Rms Titanic on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City from the standpoint of 2nd Officer Charles Herbert Lightoller (Kenneth MoreSink the Bismarck!, Scrooge). After colliding with an iceberg, a 300 feet hole is torn into the hull of the vessel giving the passengers and crew a mere three hours to escape. With only enough lifeboat places for 1178 people, A Night To Remember is the gripping account of the 2223 passengers’ desperation as the liner’s tranquillity turns to panic.

The
See full article at HeyUGuys »

A Visual Tribute to Ronald Searle: Sketches, St Trinian’s and Scrooge

  • HeyUGuys
The cartoonist Ronald Searle has died at the age of 91, his family confirmed to the BBC earlier today.

Best known for creating the schoolgirl horrors of St Trinian’s, whose doors re-opened in 2007 with two new films to complement those of the 50s and 60s, his distinctive artwork has served as an inspiration for many artists and has appeared in numerous magazines, though he did also collaborate with filmmakers over the years.

Two weeks ago I re-watched the 1970s musical telling of Scrooge with Albert Finney and Alec Guinness and, as it does each year, it evoked the festive spirit in a way that only a Box of Delights and Gonzo in a top hat can match.

The title sequence for the film is brilliantly dark, arch and beautiful in its own right. This was perhaps my first knowledge of Ronald Searle’s work and while St Trinian’s Belles
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Xbox 360 Experiment – More than games?

  • HeyUGuys
In partnership with Microsoft we are looking at the Xbox 360 console to see if it is, as promised, more than games. You can read my introductory post here for context.

Last night I had the chance to try out my new system properly for an annual festive tradition as we sat down to watch the 1970 musical version of Scrooge. Albert Finney and Alec Guinness always bring the seasonal cheer with a number of truly memorable songs and a Christmas veneer so thick you can hang your stocking on it.

Resisting the urge to show off the Minority Report Kinect-enabled navigation I instead used my voice to zip to the desired part of the new Dashboard (which, as an aside, looks fantastic and as a new user of both the Xbox 360 and the new Nokia Lumia 800 with its Window Phone Os I’m still marveling at how Microsoft managed to create
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Charles Dickens bicentenary to be marked with film and TV retrospective

BFI plans comprehensive season celebrating most adapted author of all time in early 2012

From Alec Guinness as Fagin to Miss Piggy as Mrs Cratchit, the BFI is staging a three-month retrospective of Dickens on film and TV on London's South Bank from January, to mark the novelist's bicentenary.. The season is curated by Michael Eaton and Co-curator Adrian Wootton, said Dickens's influence on cinema and TV had been immense and continues right up to the present day, with Mike Newell's Great Expectations the next movie outing for Dickens. "It demonstrates that he is not a dead, grey old man sitting on dusty shelves who nobody reads, he is a living breathing artist whose work just keeps on rippling and resonating through our culture."

All the novels have been adapted to some degree. There are around 100 silent films, of which around a third still exist, "although we keep finding new
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Charles Dickens bicentenary to be marked with film and TV retrospective

BFI plans comprehensive season celebrating most adapted author of all time in early 2012

From Alec Guinness as Fagin to Miss Piggy as Mrs Cratchit, the BFI is staging a three-month retrospective of Dickens on film and TV on London's South Bank from January, to mark the novelist's bicentenary.. The season is curated by Michael Eaton and Co-curator Adrian Wootton, said Dickens's influence on cinema and TV had been immense and continues right up to the present day, with Mike Newell's Great Expectations the next movie outing for Dickens. "It demonstrates that he is not a dead, grey old man sitting on dusty shelves who nobody reads, he is a living breathing artist whose work just keeps on rippling and resonating through our culture."

All the novels have been adapted to some degree. There are around 100 silent films, of which around a third still exist, "although we keep finding new
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New this Week: ‘The Big Year,’ ‘The Thing’ and ‘The Tree of Life (DVD)’

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

The Big Year - Owen Wilson, Jack Black, Steve Martin

Footloose - Kenny Wormald, Julianne Hough, Dennis Quaid

The Thing - Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Joel Edgerton, Ulrich Thomsen

Movie of the Week

The Big Year

The Stars: Owen Wilson, Jack Black, Steve Martin

The Plot: Three avid bird watchers compete to spot the rarest birds in North America at a prestigious annual event.

The Buzz: I was completely unaware of this film until about two weeks ago, when I first saw the trailer. Seems it snuck up on everyone, as there hasn’t been much buzz about it at all. Owen Wilson, Jack Black and Steve Martin are all, of course, potential of amazing comedy cinema, and it’ll be interest to see how the three play off of each other. If the script is good, these three guys will do it justice. I’m
See full article at Scorecard Review »

TV review: Whistle and I'll Come to You | Doctor Who | Murder on the Orient Express | Upstairs Downstairs | When Harvey Met Bob

Mr James's classic ghost story has been much tampered with. But it's still utterly terrifying

It was a Christmas of ghosts and of the past. Shhh, what's that noise? It's Mr James, the great ghost story writer, turning in his grave at Whistle and I'll Come to You (BBC2, Christmas Eve). His terrifying short story has been much tampered with. The whistle, the one that Parkins blows, unwittingly awakening the dead, is missing mysteriously. Many other things are gone or altered. Even the shoreline is wrong; it should be the east coast: dunes, windswept. This looks like Dorset.

What survives though is the spirit of the story – a man, alone by the sea, haunted, pursued by something. It is terrifying. And John Hurt's performance as that man is mesmerising, a masterclass in how to captivate. Hurt really fills a screen.

As does Michael Gambon in Doctor Who (BBC1, Christmas
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Holiday Concert And "Scrooge" Screening At Loews Jersey City, December 11

  • CinemaRetro
The landmark movie palace The Loews Jersey City Theatre is holding a wonderful event on Saturday December 11. There will be a holiday sing-a-long concert on the organ (played by The Master himself, Wayne Zimmerman, who recently brought down the house with his superb accompaniment on Nosferatu. This will be followed by a big screen showing of Scrooge starring Albert Finney and Alec Guinness. For details click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Ronald Neame obituary

Producer, director and cinematographer of many well-loved British film classics, including Oliver Twist, Tunes of Glory and The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

The producer, director, writer and cinematographer Ronald Neame, who has died aged 99, played an important role in British cinema for more than half a century. The critic Matthew Sweet once called him "a living embodiment of cinema, a sort of one-man world heritage site". Neame was assistant director to Alfred Hitchcock on Blackmail (1929), the first British talkie; he was the cinematographer on In Which We Serve (1942), Noël Coward's moving tribute to the Royal Navy during the second world war; he co-produced and co-wrote David Lean's Brief Encounter (1945) and Great Expectations (1946); and he directed Alec Guinness in two of his best roles, in The Horse's Mouth (1958) and Tunes of Glory (1960). As if this wasn't enough, Neame also conquered Hollywoo d with one of the first and most successful disaster movies,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ronald Neame, Legendary British Filmmaker, Dead At Age 99

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Ronald Neame, the legendary cinematographer-turned-screenwriter-turned producer-turned director, has died from complications from a fall. He was 99 years old. Neame's impressive resume goes back to the early days of sound films, having worked on on Alfred Hitchcock's Blackmail. The multi-talented Neame also took up screenwriting and earned Oscar nominations for co-writing the scripts for the classics Brief Encounter and Great Expectations. He was considered a pioneer in the use of Technicolor and was so revered in the British film industry that he was made a Commander of the British Empire. Neame represented the by-gone era of gentleman directors who generally dressed nattily on film sets and brought a wealth of culture to their productions. He directed such high profile films as Tunes of Glory, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, The Chalk Garden, Gambit, Scrooge, The Odessa File and the blockbuster 1972 hit The Poseidon Adventure. For more
See full article at CinemaRetro »

How Does Jim Carrey Playing Multiple Roles in 'A Christmas Carol' Benefit the Film?

The idea of one actor playing multiple characters in a film isn't a new one even though many people begin and end the conversation with Eddie Murphy for his performances in films such as Nutty Professor and Norbit all while forgetting the comedy he brought us in Coming to America.

Before Murphy we had the likes of Mel Brooks in History of the World and Spaceballs, Alec Guiness in the fantastic Kind Hearts and Coronets and Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove. Outside of Murphy it seems only Mike Myers has endured the same kind of ill treatment, primarily for taking the joke to the point it wasn't funny any longer (debatable) in the Austin Powers films and then dropping the bomb that was The Love Guru.

Looking at the performances listed above I am reminded of some classic films as well as a couple that missed the mark, but we
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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