IMDb > Ryan's Daughter (1970)
Ryan's Daughter
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Ryan's Daughter (1970) More at IMDbPro »

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Ryan's Daughter -- Set in coastal western Ireland, Ryan's Daughter is an epic love story about a young girl, married to a simple schoolteacher, who has an affair with a British soldier stationed in town.
Ryan's Daughter -- Trailer two
Ryan's Daughter -- Trailer one


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7.5/10   5,904 votes »
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Robert Bolt (original screenplay)
View company contact information for Ryan's Daughter on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 December 1970 (West Germany) See more »
A story of love...set against the violence of rebellion See more »
Set in the wake of the 1916 Easter Rising, a married woman in a small Irish village has an affair with a troubled British officer. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 9 wins & 19 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A victim of mistaken expectations See more (102 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Mitchum ... Charles Shaughnessy

Trevor Howard ... Father Collins
Christopher Jones ... Randolph Doryan

John Mills ... Michael

Leo McKern ... Thomas Ryan

Sarah Miles ... Rosy Ryan

Barry Foster ... Tim O'Leary
Marie Kean ... Mrs. McCardle
Arthur O'Sullivan ... Mr. McCardle
Evin Crowley ... Maureen
Douglas Sheldon ... Driver
Gerald Sim ... Captain
Barry Jackson ... Corporal
Des Keogh ... Lanky private

Niall Toibin ... O'Keefe
Philip O'Flynn ... Paddy
Donal Neligan ... Maureen's boyfriend
Brian O'Higgins ... Const. O'Connor
Niall O'Brien ... Bernard
Owen Sullivan ... Joseph
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Emmet Bergin ... Sean (uncredited)
May Cluskey ... Storekeeper (uncredited)
Annie D'Alton ... Old woman (uncredited)
Pat Layde ... Policeman (uncredited)
Ed O'Callaghan ... Bernard (uncredited)

Directed by
David Lean 
Writing credits
Robert Bolt (original screenplay)

Produced by
Anthony Havelock-Allan .... producer
Roy Stevens .... associate producer
Original Music by
Maurice Jarre 
Cinematography by
Freddie Young 
Film Editing by
Norman Savage 
Production Design by
Stephen B. Grimes  (as Stephen Grimes)
Art Direction by
Roy Walker 
Set Decoration by
Josie MacAvin 
Costume Design by
Jocelyn Rickards 
Makeup Department
Charles E. Parker .... makeup artist (as Charles Parker)
A.G. Scott .... hair stylist
Eric Allwright .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Production Management
Douglas Twiddy .... production manager
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles Frend .... second unit director
Roy Stevens .... second unit director: storm
Michael Stevenson .... assistant director
Pedro Vidal .... assistant director
Jonathan Burrows .... third assistant director (uncredited)
David Tringham .... assistant director (uncredited)
Art Department
Peter Dukelow .... constructor
Eddie Fowlie .... property master
Derek Irvine .... assistant art director
Brian Doyle .... plasterer (uncredited)
Mickey O'Toole .... stand-by props (uncredited)
Sound Department
John Bramall .... sound recordist
Ernie Grimsdale .... sound editor
Gordon K. McCallum .... sound mixer
Winston Ryder .... sound editor
John Hayward .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Michael Hickey .... sound (uncredited)
Special Effects by
Robert MacDonald .... special effects
Gerry Johnston .... special effects (uncredited)
Vic Armstrong .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack Cooper .... stunts (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Denys N. Coop .... camera operator: second unit (as Denys Coop)
Ernest Day .... camera operator
Robert Huke .... camera operator: second unit (as Bob Huke)
Bernie Prentice .... chief electrician
Roy Rodhouse .... chief electrician
Doug Byers .... electrician (uncredited)
Jim Dawes .... grip (uncredited)
Chris Holden .... focus puller (uncredited)
Robert Willoughby .... special still photographer (uncredited)
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Evangeline Harrison .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
Editorial Department
Tony Lawson .... assistant editor
Music Department
Maurice Jarre .... conductor
Eric Tomlinson .... music recordist
Other crew
Phyllis Crocker .... continuity
Eddie Fowlie .... location manager
William O'Kelly .... production liaison
Ron Bareham .... assistant accountant (uncredited)
Al Burgess .... location manager (uncredited)
Julian Holloway .... voice dubbing: Christopher Jones (uncredited)
John Trehy .... production accountant (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Rated R for a sex scene (re-rating) (1996)
195 min (general release version) | 206 min (roadshow/DVD version)
Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Mono (35 mm optical prints) | 4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints)
Argentina:16 | Australia:PG | Australia:M (TV rating) | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:16 | Japan:PG12 (2015) | Netherlands:14 (orginal rating) | New Zealand:M (special edition) | Peru:14 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:M18 | Sweden:11 | UK:AA (original rating) | UK:15 (video rating) | USA:GP (original rating) | USA:R (re-rating) (1996) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

This was the final British film to be shot in 65 mm until Hamlet (1996), in which John Mills (Michael) also appeared, 26 years later.See more »
Anachronisms: As he is driving Major Doryan to the camp, the corporal asks him if he had been in the Second Battle of the Marne. The Second Battle of the Marne was fought in July and August of 1918 near the end of WWI while events in Ryan's Daughter are set in 1916 not long after the Easter Rising.See more »
[first lines]
Rosy Ryan:Give it over, Michael. Thanks.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Guinea WillieSee more »


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111 out of 118 people found the following review useful.
A victim of mistaken expectations, 24 August 2004
Author: david-greene5 from North Huntingdon, PA, U.S.A.

It is such a major tragedy that one of the greatest directors in the history of film, David Lean was so savaged by the critics after pouring vast stores of time, energy and devotion into this production. It has long been clear to me why "Ryan's Daughter" was so poorly received. After Lean's previous epics, everyone was certain that, with all the time and money that went into this film, and with its lengthy running time, it would simply have to be a similar type of show. When people bring such expectations to a movie and are confronted with something so daringly different, they often focus on what they didn't see and miss the virtue of the picture they saw. This film is too "slow", too absorbed with the subtle dynamics of the interaction between its characters for a viewer who is burning to see vast battle scenes, mighty parades and mobs of extras caught up in violent historical struggles. The "spectacle" in this film (and spectacle it is indeed) comes from the exquisite widescreen lensing of stunning Irish coastal scenery. The fabulous storm sequence with villagers battling raging surf in their efforts to retrieve floating contraband is, in my opinion, unmatched in all the thousands of movies I have seen. The drama of the central characters' lives and the depiction of the way the eternal conflicts that continue to trouble their nation work to destroy normal existence for them....this all works for me. I guess there are going to be many who just can't buy into the whole thing, but I can only feel sorry for them. To me, Lean did create an epic here, but not the traditional kind that everyone came to see. It is a "feast-for-the-eyes", intimate epic of the tumultuous emotional life of a little village caught in a swirl of hatred, suspicion, prejudice and seething conflict with an occupying army. One of my dearest hopes is that I may live to see a handsome DVD release of this splendid masterpiece before too much more time elapses. It should NEVER be viewed in some pan-and-scan edition on an ordinary TV! Seen this way with all that glorious cinematography cropped and miniaturized, "Ryan's Daughter" could indeed be seen as a failure. I always wonder how many magnificent David Lean films we will never see as a result of the unproductive years that resulted from the crushing effect on the director of the widespread rejection of this wonderful creation. What a travesty!

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