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Pippi on the Run (1970) Poster

Trivia

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The only film in the Pippi Longstocking (1969) TV series to not be based on any of the three Pippi books written by Astrid Lindgren, who wrote this story exclusively as a film. She did, however, write a book adaptation of the movie after the fact. The book adaptation is still available, even in English.
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Because the house that was used for the exteriors of Villa Villekulla had been sold and the garden taken out, filmmakers had to use a model for any full exterior shots.
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This theatrical feature film was the denouement of the Pippi Longstocking (1969) TV & movie series starring Inger Nilsson.
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Mr. Nilsson (Pippi's monkey) and Lilla Gubben (Pippi's horse) were supposed to appear throughout the film, but had to be written out of most of the plot, as the animals were reportedly hard to handle on set, and had to be drugged to keep them under control.
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Oddly, this was the first Pippi movie theatrically released in Japan by Nippon Planning in 1973 under the title "Nagakutsushita no Pippi" (Pippi Longstocking's name in Japan). To further add to the confusion, the rest of the Japanese theatrical releases were, in order, the first compilation film Pippi Longstocking (1969) ("Pippi no Atarashii Bôken"/"Pippi's New Adventure"), Pippi in the South Seas (1970) ("Pippi no Takarajima"/"Pippi on Treasure Island"), and Pippi Goes on Board (1969) ("Pippi Fune ni Noru"/"Pippi Goes on Board"). The 2005 Japanese DVD release by Kadokawa Entertainment released this film under a somewhat more suitable title, "Pippi Longstocking Continues" ("Zoku Nagakutsushita no Pippi"), to follow the first compilation film.
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For the German version of the original 13-episode Swedish TV series (Pippi Longstocking (1969)), this feature film was divided into four episodes. These would be Episodes 18-21, and the collective name of the 4-part story arc (and, in this case, the new series finale) was titled "With Pippi Longstocking on the Roll" ("Mit Pippi Langstrumpf auf der Walze").
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The original Swedish title translates in English to "On the Run with Pippi Longstocking." The literal translations of some of this film's foreign language titles include "Pippi Out of Bounds" (Germany), "That Witch Pippi Longstocking" (Italy), "Pippi Longstocking" (Japan; see another trivia item here), "Pippi Longstocking at Large" (Finland), "Pippi Longstocking - On the Run" (Norway), "Pippi Longstocking - Pippi Ran Away" (Greece), and "Pippi Escapes" (Denmark).
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Hans Alfredson (who played Konrad the Peddler in this film) and his "Hasseåtage" comedy troupe partner Tage Danielsson were originally slated to play the policemen Kling and Klang in the Pippi Longstocking (1969) TV series.
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Assistant director Ingvar Skogsberg directed at least one scene, the one when Pippi walks on the tightrope
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

In the original books, Pippi was simply super-strong (and possibly invulnerable, as she can land from tremendous heights without so much as a scratch), and never had any magic powers. This was also apparent in the TV show (Pippi Longstocking (1969)) and the previous film (Pippi in the South Seas (1970)). But in this film, Pippi begins to display feats of supernatural power, besides her super-strength. She causes the vehicles she rides to fly (a wheel-less bike, a derelict car, and, finally, a broomstick), suggesting that Pippi may be a witch. The "magical power" element was carried over more strongly into the American adaptation, The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking (1988) (which was partly based on this film's story), in which Pippi used magic powers more commonly.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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