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Arrow Video’s January Blu-ray Releases Include The Cat O’ Nine Tails, Re-animator, The Hills Have Eyes (1977)

  • DailyDead
The holidays may be over by the time January rolls around, but Arrow Video will still have gifts in store for horror fans with Blu-ray releases that include Dario Argento's The Cat O' Nine Tails, Stuart Gordon's Re-Animator, and Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes.

We have release details and images of Arrow Video's January Blu-ray releases below. The Cat O' Nine Tails is a limited edition item, and while Re-Animator and The Hills Have Eyes were previously released as limited editions by Arrow Video, they will be hitting shelves as re-releases in January (with slightly less goodies, but still plenty of bonus features and eye-popping 4K restorations to enjoy).

From Arrow Video: "New UK/Us Title: The Cat o’ Nine Tails (Dual Format Blu-ray + DVD) Limited Edition

Pre-order The Cat O’ Nine Tails in the UK: http://bit.ly/2i9y0cp

Pre-order The Cat
See full article at DailyDead »

Play Dirty

In a war film, what’s the difference between nasty exploitation and just plain honest reportage? André De Toth made tough-minded action films with the best of them, and this nail-biting commando mission with Michael Caine and Nigel Davenport is simply superb, one of those great action pictures that’s not widely screened. To its credit it’s not ‘feel good’ enough to be suitable for Memorial Day TV marathons.

Play Dirty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Michael Caine, Nigel Davenport, Nigel Green, Harry Andrews.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife

Film Editor: Jack Slade

Art Direction: Tom Morahan, Maurice Pelling

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Lotte Colin, Melvyn Bragg, from a story by George Marton

Produced by Harry Saltzman

Directed by André De Toth

Some movies that were ignored when new now seem far more important, perhaps due to the tenor of times.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Battle of the River Plate

Powell & Pressburger’s big-scale historical epic is perhaps the best show ever about an old-school naval encounter between battleships. The first half depicts the showdown between England and Germany in the South Atlantic, and the second half a tense diplomatic game in the neutral country of Uruguay. Peter Finch, Bernard Lee and Anthony Quayle shine as sea captains.

Panzerschiff Graf Spee (The Battle of the River Plate)

Region B Blu-ray

ITV Studios Home Entertainment (Germany)

1956 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 119, 106 117 min./ Pursuit of the Graf Spee / Street Date 2010 / Available from Amazon UK £16.90

Starring: Peter Finch, Bernard Lee, Anthony Quayle, John Gregson, Ian Hunter, Jack Gwillim, Lionel Murton, Anthony Bushell, Peter Illing, Michael Goodliffe, Patrick Macnee, Christopher Lee.

Cinematography: Christopher Challis

Production Design: Arthur Lawson

Film Editor: Reginald Mills

Original Music: Brian Easdale

Written, Produced & Directed by Michael Powell & Emeric Pressberger

The best way so far to see the impressive The Battle of the River Plate
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

How ‘Planet of the Apes’ Started Hollywood’s Franchise Obsession

  • Indiewire
How ‘Planet of the Apes’ Started Hollywood’s Franchise Obsession
If Matt Reeves’ much-anticipated “War on the Planet of the Apes” (20th Century Fox) opens Friday to an expected $70 million or more, that would put it ahead (in domestic returns at least) of such recent high altitude-franchise stumbles as “Alien: Covenant,” “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and “Transformers.”

Several factors contribute to the elevated respect for the series, going back almost half a century to when the first film, never intended as anything other than a standalone, became a surprise success in 1968.

Let’s track some curious highlights on the unusual trajectory that brings us to the ninth entry in the longest running English-language film series other than James Bond:

The Genesis Was a Stand-Alone Novel

Pierre Boule was well-known for the World War II novel “The Bridge on the River Kwai” which became a David Lean Best Picture winner and massive worldwide hit in the late 1950s.
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94
Cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp, who won an Oscar for “The Towering Inferno” and was also nominated for shooting “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream,” died May 31.

His daughter Kathy Guyitt and the American Society of Cinematographers confirmed his death.

Both “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream” were directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, for whom he also shot “Papillon” and later “Yes, Giorgio.”

His work included memorable films of the 1970s such as “Billy Jack,” “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls,” “Kansas City Bomber,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and “The Amityville Horror.”

Koenekamp received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asc in 2005.

He was born in Los Angeles, where his father, Hans F. Koenekamp, was a Hollywood cinematographer and special effects expert. After starting out as a film loader at Rko, he moved up through the ranks and eventually became director of photography for several seasons of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

A
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94

Fred J. Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Dp of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dies at 94
Cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp, who won an Oscar for “The Towering Inferno” and was also nominated for shooting “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream,” died May 31.

His daughter Kathy Guyitt and the American Society of Cinematographers confirmed his death.

Both “Patton” and “Islands in the Stream” were directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, for whom he also shot “Papillon” and later “Yes, Giorgio.”

His work included memorable films of the 1970s such as “Billy Jack,” “Beyond the Valley of the Dolls,” “Kansas City Bomber,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and “The Amityville Horror.”

Koenekamp received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asc in 2005.

He was born in Los Angeles, where his father, Hans F. Koenekamp, was a Hollywood cinematographer and special effects expert. After starting out as a film loader at Rko, he moved up through the ranks and eventually became director of photography for several seasons of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

A memorial service will be held June 17 at
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Composers And The Scores That Made Them Great

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

With Actors, Directors, Actresses and Screenwriters under our collective belt and Cinematographers still to come, we presently turn our eye towards Composers, whose music lends so much to the films they work on.

As with the other lists, credit is given for not merely one or two sterling scores, but rather a consistently excellent body of work with specific stand-out films. To be blunt, this is a trickier prospect than it at first appears. Just because a film is terrific or well-loved doesn’t necessarily mean that the score is itself a standout. We begin with perhaps the most obvious and celebrated film composer of them all…..

John WilliamsStar Wars

Goodness me. The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno, Earthquake, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Long Goodbye, Catch Me If You Can, Star Wars, Close Encounters, Star Wars, Superman, Et, Born on the Fourth of July,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Jerry Goldsmith’s 10 Most Indelible Scores

Jerry Goldsmith’s 10 Most Indelible Scores
In honor of Jerry Goldsmith’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Jon Burlingame offers ten scores that best capture the late composer’s genius.

1. A Patch of Blue (1965) For the tender relationship between a blind white girl (Elizabeth Hartman) and the kindly black man (Sidney Poitier) she befriends, Goldsmith wrote a haunting, delicate score featuring piano and harmonica.

2. The Sand Pebbles (1966) Goldsmith’s first epic score, for director Robert Wise’s film about a U.S. gunboat in Chinese waters in the 1920s starring Steve McQueen. He evoked an Asian atmosphere with exotic instruments, and his love theme (“And We Were Lovers”) was recorded by artists from Andy Williams to Shirley Bassey.

3. Planet of the Apes (1968) A landmark in film-music history, this unearthly, Bartok- and Stravinsky-influenced soundscape strongly implied that Charlton Heston and his fellow astronauts were marooned on a far-off planet… when, in fact, they were on Earth all along.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jerry Goldsmith Receives a Star on the Walk of Fame

Jerry Goldsmith Receives a Star on the Walk of Fame
When Joe Dante was asked about supporting the effort to secure a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Jerry Goldsmith, the director – who had worked with the respected composer on nine films over 20 years – said he was “flabbergasted” to realize Goldsmith didn’t already have one.

On May 9, the Oscar- and Emmy-winning composer of such classics as “Chinatown,” “Planet of the Apes,” “Patton” and dozens more will receive his star, posthumously, on Hollywood Boulevard just east of Highland Avenue. Goldsmith died in 2004.

Dante, for whom Goldsmith scored “Gremlins,” “Explorers,” “Innerspace” and other films, cited “his brilliance and versatility. Any film he scored was automatically improved tenfold.”

Few filmmakers would disagree. Paul Verhoeven, who did “Total Recall,” “Basic Instinct” and “Hollow Man” with Goldsmith, recalls: “Every film was a new adventure, as Jerry was able to adapt to the most diverse narratives and styles. He never repeated himself, always looking for new,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

AFI to honour cinematographer Frederick Elmes

  • ScreenDaily
AFI to honour cinematographer Frederick Elmes
1972 alumnus has worked with David Lynch, John Cassavetes, Ang Lee, Jim Jarmusch.

Cinematographer Frederick Elmes will receive the AFI’s 2017 Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal.

The honour recognises the “extraordinary creative talents of an AFI alumnus or alumna who embodies the qualities of filmmaker Franklin J. Schaffner: talent, taste, dedication and commitment to quality storytelling in film and television.”

Elmes’s credits include Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Wild At Heart, The Ice Storm, Broken Flowers, and River’s Edge, among others.

The presentation will take place at the AFI Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton in Hollywood on June 8.

Elmes collaborated with Keaton on her 1987 directorial debut Heaven and has earned a Primetime Emmy nomination, two Film Independent Spirit Awards and a New York Film Critics Circle Award, among other accolades.

Prior recipients of the Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal include Lynch, Darren Aronofsky, Homeland director Lesli Link Glatter, Wonder Woman director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscar Political Moments: A Timeline of the Memorable Sacrifices, Protests, and Speeches Throughout The Telecast’s History

  • Indiewire
Oscar Political Moments: A Timeline of the Memorable Sacrifices, Protests, and Speeches Throughout The Telecast’s History
Filmmakers and stars have often taken a political stance by choosing which projects to make. But when the Academy Awards ceremony began in 1929 to honor the best in film, this created a more public way to demonstrate opinions about the state of the world, the government or a cause.

Read More: Meryl Streep Fires Back at Donald Trump in Blistering Speech: ‘We Have the Right to Live Our Lives’

Not everyone has taken this opportunity though, except for maybe wearing the odd ribbon to support awareness or using their attendance (or lack thereof) to show solidarity. Those blessed by winning a coveted statuette, however, can use their actual acceptance speech as a platform to speak out. Although the awards started being televised in 1953, it took until the 1970s until winners began to really take advantage of having a massive audience for their views. And at times, even the Academy itself got political.
See full article at Indiewire »

Whatever and Ever Amen at 20: Ben Folds’ Track by Track Commentary on the ’90s Piano Rock Classic

  • PEOPLE.com
Whatever and Ever Amen at 20: Ben Folds’ Track by Track Commentary on the ’90s Piano Rock Classic
Lugging a baby grand piano onto a punk club stage in the ’90s was about conspicuous as bringing a baby elephant—and twice as inconvenient. But any patrons who feared that they were about to endure a Gershwin recital were soon set straight by Ben Folds, frontman and primary songwriter of Chapel Hill, North Carolina’s Ben Folds Five.

Flanked by an explosive rhythm section in the form of stickman Darren Jessee and bassist Robert Sledge (PSA: the Five are actually three), Folds earned a reputation as the Jimi Hendrix of the piano—a violent virtuoso who punished all 88 keys
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Soviet sci-fi film reworked by Francis Ford Coppola

Ryan Lambie Feb 21, 2017

Before he made The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, Francis Ford Coppola got his start by editing monsters into a Soviet sci-fi film...

Everyone loves a good success story, and Hollywood history's full of them. Actors sleeping in their cars until they get their first lucky break. Writers papering the walls of their lodgings with rejection letters until they finally get a script in front of a receptive producer. Filmmakers who've spent years paying their dues before a studio finally comes calling.

See related Robot Wars interview: presenter Angela Scanlon Robot Wars episode 6 review Robot Wars episode 5 review Robot Wars episode 4 review Robot Wars episode 3 review

Director Francis Ford Coppola, before he shot to fame - and, for a time, considerable wealth - with such films as The Godfather, The Conversation and Apocalypse Now, scrabbled around at the lower end of the industry like just about everyone else.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Spain’s Gil Parrondo, a Two-Time Oscar Winner, Dies at 95

Spain’s Gil Parrondo, a Two-Time Oscar Winner, Dies at 95
Madrid — Spain’s Gil Parrondo, an Academy Award winning art director for “Patton” and “Nicholas and Alexandra,” died on Saturday in Madrid. He was 95. “He had no other illness than his age,” his nephew, Oscar Parrondo, told Spanish news agency EFE.

Given to one of Spain’s last links with its cinema of the 1930s, Parrondo’s two Oscars was the largest recognition for a generation of Spaniards who worked their way up the ranks to key crew positions as Hollywood brought its big budget productions to Spain, making avail of its scenery, highly competitive prices and dictator Francisco Franco’s opposition to foreign companies repatriation of profits.

Born in Luarca in Spain’s northern Asturias on June 17, 1921, Parrondo’s big break came relatively early. He scored his first job on 1939’s “Los cuatro Robinsones,” assisting set decorator Sigfrido Burmann with whom he worked for 10 years, including on films by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DVD Review: "The Double Man" (1967) Starring Yul Brynner And Britt Ekland, Warner Archive Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

The Warner Archive has released a slew of worthwhile 60s spy movies and TV series lately. Among the under-rated gems is The Double Man, a 1967 Cold War thriller starring Yul Brynner, who gives a powerful performance as American intelligence agent Dan Slater. His teenaged son is killed while skiing in Switzerland and Slater suspects it was actually murder. He finds he's been lured to Alps as part of a complex plot to kill him and replace him with an enemy agent with his identical facial features and characteristics. The plot was covered with moss even at the time since it formed the basis of a two-part Man From U.N.C.L.E. episode, The Double Affair, that was released theatrically the previous year as The Spy With My Face.  Still, this is a highly intelligent, gritty film with Brynner as the most hard-ass hero imaginable. Devoid of any humor,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

10 Movies to Stream on Memorial Day

10 Movies to Stream on Memorial Day
Memorial Day is that time Americans set aside each year to remember and honor the sacrifices of our fallen military veterans. But it's also a day off from work, and for those who want to spend the day in front of their TV without feeling unpatriotic or ungrateful — relax, we've got you've covered. We've scoured the streaming services and digital rental outlets, and we've found nine movies (and one mini-series) that'll fill your entire holiday with thoughtful, provocative, appropriate entertainment. By the time you're done, our nation's fighting forces may
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Fred Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer on 'The Towering Inferno,' Dies at 94

Fred Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer on 'The Towering Inferno,' Dies at 94
Fred Koenekamp, the Oscar-winning cinematographer known for his work on such films as Patton, Papillon and The Towering Inferno, has died. He was 94.

Koenekamp died May 31, his daughter Kathy told The Hollywood Reporter. He suffered a stroke last year and died at her home in Bonita Springs, Fla.

Koenekamp spent more than a decade at MGM, where he served as director of photography on several films as well as on the stylish NBC series The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The innovative cinematographer won his Oscar (shared with Joseph F. Biroc) for the disaster-film classic The Towering Inferno (1974) and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Fred Koenekamp, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer on 'The Towering Inferno,' Dies at 94

Fred Koenekamp, the Oscar-winning cinematographer known for his work on such films as Patton, Papillon and The Towering Inferno, has died. He was 94.

Koenekamp died May 31, his daughter Kathy told The Hollywood Reporter. He suffered a stroke last year and died at her home in Bonita Springs, Fla.

Koenekamp spent more than a decade at MGM, where he served as director of photography on several films as well as on the stylish NBC series The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The innovative cinematographer won his Oscar (shared with Joseph F. Biroc) for the disaster-film classic The Towering Inferno (1974) and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

March Madness: "Batman V. Superman" - Is There A Joker In The Deck?

  • CinemaRetro
"Batman v. Superman": potential blockbuster or "Cleopatra Redux".

By Lee Pfeiffer

The heavily-hyped Warner Brothers super hero epic "Batman V. Superman:  Dawn of Justice" is one of the most heavily promoted films in years. It's also one of the most expensive. Variety estimates that the film's $250 million production budget plus ancillary marketing costs will make it necessary for the movie to gross $800 worldwide just to break even. You read that right: $800 million. One industry analyst says that anything less than a gross of $1 billion will be considered a disappointment. Warner Brothers contends that those figures don't take into consideration ancillary revenues from video and merchandising. Fair enough, but if a film bombs, generally speaking, the merchandise and video sales do, too. If you doubt it, how many people did you see walking around with "Waterworld" or "Howard the Duck" T shirts? Veteran screenwriter William Goldman once said of the film industry "Nobody knows anything.
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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