MOVIEmeter
Top 5000
Up 360 this week

Patton (1970)

GP  -  Biography | Drama | History  -  2 April 1970 (USA)
8.1
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 8.1/10 from 63,862 users   Metascore: 91/100
Reviews: 224 user | 102 critic | 9 from Metacritic.com

The World War II phase of the career of the controversial American general, George S. Patton.

Writers:

(screen story and screenplay), (screen story and screenplay), 2 more credits »
Watch Trailer
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 25 titles
created 02 Dec 2010
 
a list of 42 titles
created 09 Jul 2011
 
a list of 25 titles
created 03 Sep 2011
 
a list of 25 titles
created 08 Jul 2012
 
a list of 42 titles
created 05 Mar 2013
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Patton (1970)

Patton (1970) on IMDb 8.1/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Patton.

User Polls

Won 7 Oscars. Another 18 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Pianist (2002)
Biography | Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

A Polish Jewish musician struggles to survive the destruction of the Warsaw ghetto of World War II.

Director: Roman Polanski
Stars: Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann, Frank Finlay
Jarhead (2005)
Biography | Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Based on former Marine Anthony Swofford's best-selling 2003 book about his pre-Desert Storm experiences in Saudi Arabia and about his experiences fighting in Kuwait.

Director: Sam Mendes
Stars: Jake Gyllenhaal, Jamie Foxx, Lucas Black
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

In the Fascist Italy Pre-World War II of Benito Mussolini, the cruel General Rodolfo Graziani is directly assigned by Il Dulce to fight in the colonial war in Libya to vanquish the Arab ... See full summary »

Director: Moustapha Akkad
Stars: Anthony Quinn, Oliver Reed, Rod Steiger
PT 109 (1963)
Biography | Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Dramatization of President John F. Kennedy's war time experiences during which he captained a PT boat, took it to battle and had it sunk by a Japanese destroyer. He and the survivors had to... See full summary »

Director: Leslie H. Martinson
Stars: Cliff Robertson, Robert Culp, Ty Hardin
Downfall (2004)
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Traudl Junge, the final secretary for Adolf Hitler, tells of the Nazi dictator's final days in his Berlin bunker at the end of WWII.

Director: Oliver Hirschbiegel
Stars: Bruno Ganz, Alexandra Maria Lara, Ulrich Matthes
Biography | Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

The biography of Ron Kovic. Paralyzed in the Vietnam war, he becomes an anti-war and pro-human rights political activist after feeling betrayed by the country he fought for.

Director: Oliver Stone
Stars: Tom Cruise, Raymond J. Barry, Caroline Kava
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.9/10 X  

In Poland during World War II, Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

Director: Steven Spielberg
Stars: Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley
Lincoln (2012)
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

As the Civil War continues to rage, America's president struggles with continuing carnage on the battlefield and as he fights with many inside his own cabinet on the decision to emancipate the slaves.

Director: Steven Spielberg
Stars: Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

A pragmatic U.S. Marine observes the dehumanizing effects the U.S.-Vietnam War has on his fellow recruits from their brutal boot camp training to the bloody street fighting in Hue.

Director: Stanley Kubrick
Stars: Matthew Modine, R. Lee Ermey, Vincent D'Onofrio
Persepolis (2007)
Animation | Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Poignant coming-of-age story of a precocious and outspoken young Iranian girl that begins during the Islamic Revolution.

Directors: Vincent Paronnaud, Marjane Satrapi
Stars: Chiara Mastroianni, Catherine Deneuve, Gena Rowlands
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

An in-depth examination of the ways in which the Vietnam War disrupts and impacts the lives of people in a small industrial town in Pennsylvania.

Director: Michael Cimino
Stars: Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Deserting soldier dresses as a woman to escape detection; liking the female role he goes to a dance with another soldier and is exposed.

Director: Michael Apted
Stars: Glenda Jackson, Oliver Reed, Brian Deacon
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Stephen Young ...
Captain Chester B. Hansen
...
Carey Loftin ...
General Bradley's Driver (as Cary Loftin)
Albert Dumortier ...
Frank Latimore ...
...
Captain Richard N. Jenson
Karl Michael Vogler ...
...
General Patton's Driver
Pat Zurica ...
First Lieutenant Alexander Stiller (as Patrick J. Zurica)
James Edwards ...
Sergeant William George Meeks
Lawrence Dobkin ...
Colonel Gaston Bell
David Bauer ...
Lieutenant General Harry Buford
John Barrie ...
Edit

Storyline

"Patton" tells the tale of General George S. Patton, famous tank commander of World War II. The film begins with Patton's career in North Africa and progresses through the invasion of Europe and the fall of the Third Reich. Side plots also speak of Patton's numerous faults such his temper and tendency toward insubordination, faults that would prevent him from becoming the lead American general in the Normandy Invasion as well as to his being relieved as Occupation Commander of Germany. Written by Anthony Hughes <husnock31@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

GP | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

| | | | |

Release Date:

2 April 1970 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Patton  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints) (Westrex Recording System)| (35 mm prints)| (70 mm re-release)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

George C. Scott felt he hadn't really captured the full character of Patton. He would apologize to director Franklin J. Schaffner on the set for not fully realizing the complexity of the man. See more »

Goofs

Visiting the Carthaginian ancient battle field in Tunisia, Patton says, "The Arab women stripped the dead soldiers of their clothing." There were no Arabs in Tunisia during the Punic wars. The line is complete fiction, obviously intended to draw parallelism between the ancient Carthaginians and Patton's troops in the first shot of the movie (who were not scavenged by Tunisian civilians in real life either). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Patton: Now I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country.
See more »

Crazy Credits

One of the very, very few Twentieth Century-Fox films in which that company's logo is not shown at all, beginning or end. The film simply begins with the opening speech, and the opening Fox logo is replaced with an in-credit text-only notice after the speech. However, recent television showings have added the logo (not on DVD prints), and the addition is obviously spliced in from another piece of film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in FTA (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

God Save the King!
(uncredited)
Traditional
In the background for a London scene
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Epic hagiography
12 February 2005 | by (Deming, New Mexico, USA) – See all my reviews

It's a splendidly done movie. Scott's performance is powerful. He does everything but reach out, grab you by the shirt, and shout in your face. Karl Malden is likable and full of common sense, but he is the only person in the movie whom we can grasp as a character -- except for Scott himself. Scott is as good at his job as Patton was, and in fact the quality of his performance is less volatile than Patton's own, with virtually no weak spots.

That's part of the problem. Patton himself. I suppose that like most people he had a "good" side -- loving family, played with his dog, collected stamps and whatnot. But as good and aggressive a general as he was, he wasn't a particularly likable guy. It's easy to demand that everyone in your command have shoes as shiny as yours -- especially when you've got some black PFC doing your shining for you.

The movie is noticeably slanted. Patton's weakness, like Coriolanus's, is ambition. Sometimes it's played for laughs. He carried the stars of a Lieutenant General around with him until word of his promotion comes down, then immediately has them pinned on. But only three times is his meanness illustrated without tongue in cheek. (1) During a conversation with Bradley he reveals that he's disobeyed orders by sending his army on a mission to beat Montgomery in taking Sicily. He calls the attack "a reconnaissance in force". He receives an order to get his troops back where they belong and tells his aide to send the message back because it's garbled. "A simple old soldier," Bradly comments disapprovingly. (2) He orders General Truscott to stage some amphibious landings which will help him take Messina before Montgomery. Truscott complains that they're not prepared to do that without heavy casualties. Patton lies down and threatens to fire Truscott and get someone else to do the job. (3) While visiting a hospital and presenting the wounded with decorations he comes across a soldier whose nerves are shot and who is weeping, and Patton slaps him twice and sends him back to the front.

His mean streak went beyond those incidents. He used to practice his arrogant, threatening scowl in front of the mirror. Whether or not it improved the GI's morale to wear neckties in combat is, at best, arguable. (What would Patton make of the Israeli army?) But the simple historical fact is that the movie pitches even these "mean" incidents at the audience like softballs. He didn't just slap a soldier who was feeling sorry for himself, which is the picture the film presents. He slapped two soldiers on separate occasions, one suffering from combat fatigue (which is no joke) and the other from malaria and other illnesses. Patton also enjoyed an intimate relationship with his niece, a Red Cross donut girl, who accompanied him in England and France, much to his wife's displeasure.

Those slapping incidents cost Patton a bit in the way of professional esteem but it didn't cost any lives. And it didn't cause him any remorse. Even in his "apology," he claims he was trying to "shame a coward." What DID cost lives was Patton's cobbling together a small task force to liberate a POW camp in Germany shortly before the war's end, when such a dangerous move was no longer necessary. "Task Force Baum" was recognized by its leaders for the lost cause it was, a plunge deep into enemy territory without any backup. There were 53 vehicles and 294 men. All the vehicles were destroyed or captured. Twenty-five of the men were killed, 32 wounded, and almost all the rest captured. The purpose of the mission, it was tacitly agreed, was to rescue Patton's son-in-law.

His fitful harshness towards his troops is usually justified in the movie, even if it looks excessive. The soldier-slapping scene is preceded by one in which Patton kneels in the hospital, whispers something to a soldier whose face is covered by bandages, and lovingly places a medal on his chest. Next thing he encounters: Tim Considine, fully dressed, sitting up, and sobbing with self pity. Earlier, when Patton asks a cook why he's not wearing sidearms, the cook laughs genially and replies, "Sidearms? Why, hell, General, I'm a cook!" I missed the part where cooks learn to laugh in the face of orders from a general, but it gives Patton a chance to tear everybody a new one.

Everyone paid for Patton's ambition and vanity, even those not under his command. The gasoline and other supplies he diverted to his own forces during the run through France helped him alright, but they were also needed elsewhere.

I don't know why it's been said that George C. Scott himself didn't like Patton. Scott complained that Patton was being treated too harshly in the film and he tried to undermine the message in small ways -- lying down while ordering Truscott to conduct amphibious operations. Patton would never have done that, Scott claimed.

The movie's subtitle is "Salute to a Rebel." Very stylish for 1970 audiences, but the material is presented in such a way as to leave us with a lingering admiration for Patton's genius and bullheadedness. What kind of "rebel" was he? He was more of an authoritarian Arschloch than anybody else in his greater vicinity.

I gave the movie high marks because it's as well done as it is -- disregarding its relationship to Patton himself. I didn't mind so much that the wrong tanks were used and that the production could only find two Heinkel 111s in flying condition. The location shooting is great, the cinematography crisp and unimpeachable, the score one of Goldsmith's best, and Scott's performance deserved whatever awards it got.


17 of 22 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Where are the Shermans? max-silver
No Patton, no 1970 film in the Top 250 TwistedMango
Various items I noticed (2012 Bluray edition) curt-simpkins
What would be the outcome nuwansube
Remastered Blu-ray now available and looks superb fortean2
Patton erikbeale
Discuss Patton (1970) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?