On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (1970) - News Poster

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Finian’s Rainbow

As a musical it’s excellent — fine tunes and lyrics, great singing and dancing by the ever-youthful Fred Astaire, the glorious songbird Petula Clark, and the impishly weird Tommy Steele cast appropriately as a grimacing Leprechaun. The update of what was a politically acute Broadway hit in 1947 is awkward but the show is a melodious pleasure — great color, fine voices and peppy direction by Francis Ford Coppola on his first big studio feature.

Finian’s Rainbow

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 145 141 min. / Street Date March 7, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Fred Astaire, Petula Clark, Tommy Steele, Don Francks, Keenan Wynn, Barbara Hancock, Al Freeman Jr., Ronald Colby, Dolph Sweet, Wright King, Louis Silas.

Cinematography: Philip Lathrop

Film Editor: Melvin Shapiro

Original Music: Ray Heindorf

Written by E.Y. Harburg, Fred Saidy

Produced by Joseph Landon

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Finian’s Rainbow is a unique musical with a strange history.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

New to Streaming: ‘Don’t Think Twice,’ ‘Green Room,’ ‘Burn After Reading,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)

An ecstatically original work of film-history-philosophy with a digital-cinema palette of acutely crafted compositions. Amour Fou seamlessly blends together the paintings of Vermeer, the acting of Bresson, and the psychological undercurrents of a Dostoevsky novel. It is an intensely thrilling and often slyly comic work that manages to combine a passionately dispassionate love story of the highest order with a larger socio-historical examination of a new era of freedom,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Harry Connick Jr. Takes His Southern Charm and Wit to Daytime TV

Harry Connick Jr. Takes His Southern Charm and Wit to Daytime TV
Whenever Harry Connick Jr.’s name popped up on the guest list for “The Late Show With David Letterman,” Eric and Justin Stangel didn’t worry about that night’s show.

The brothers — head writers for “The Late Show” for 17 years — knew that Connick was money as a guest. He was a favorite of Letterman’s because he was funny, fearless, and fast on his feet. The New Orleans native proved a natural raconteur who could effortlessly roll with whatever Letterman tossed at him over 21 appearances between 1993 and 2014.

Starting Sept. 12, those qualities will get a workout from the other side of the desk when Connick debuts as host of “Harry,” a syndicated daytime series that he promises will be unlike any other hour on television. The Stangel brothers developed the show with Connick, and the three share executive producer credit.

In the estimation of one who knows what it takes to last as a TV host, connick
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Arnold Scaasi (8 May 1930 – 3 August 2015)

When Arnold Scaasi opened his couture salon in 1964, he soon became a couturier to the stars. He was already a favoured designer for Barbra Streisand when he famously dressed her for the 1969 Oscars. Streisand was up for Best Actress for her movie debut in Funny Girl and was established as something of an ‘individual’; usually described as ‘kooky’, she was completely different from anyone else, an innovator of style, and challenging and changing the ideas of beauty. So it is no surprise that when it came to her clothing choice for the Oscars, Streisand resisted the usual protocol of an evening gown and instead opted for a most extraordinary Scaasi-designed pant suit. Made from black, sheer, sequined net fabric, the over-blouse had a white peter-pan collar with black pussy bow and over-sized white cuffs, while in Scaasi’s own words, the ‘bell-bottomed trousers were exaggerated and had many godets flaring
See full article at Clothes on Film »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History

  • Hitfix
Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. How to decide in the grand scheme of things which film year stands above all others? History gives us no clear methodology to unravel this thorny but extremely important question. Is it the year with the highest average score of movies? So a year that averages out to a B + might be the winner over a field strewn with B’s, despite a few A +’s. Or do a few masterpieces lift up a year so far that whatever else happened beyond those three or four films is of no consequence? Both measures are worthy, and the winner by either of those would certainly be a year not to be sneezed at. But I contend the only true measure of a year’s
See full article at Hitfix »

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93
Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93
Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Barbra Streisand to be Honored by American Society of Cinematographers

Award-winning actress-director-producer-writer-singer Barbra Streisand will receive the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) 2015 Board of Governors Award. The Oscar®-winning filmmaker and entertainer will be honored during the 29th Annual Asc Outstanding Achievement Awards gala here on February 15 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza. “Barbra Streisand’s accomplishments across the entertainment industry are unparalleled, and we look forward to celebrating her groundbreaking contributions to the art of filmmaking,” said Asc President Richard Crudo. “The three films that Ms. Streisand directed have earned 14 Academy Award® nominations, and her skill in working with cinematographers in achieving her vision is a hallmark of her directorial work.” She is the only artist to achieve Oscar, Tony®, Emmy®, Grammy®, Directors Guild of America, Golden Globe®, and Peabody Awards, as well as a National Medal of Honor, France’s Légion d’honneur, the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award, and the Kennedy Center Honors. Streisand won a
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

The Way She Was: New Photo Book Showcases Barbra Streisand's Early Years in Hollywood

  • PEOPLE.com
The Way She Was: New Photo Book Showcases Barbra Streisand's Early Years in Hollywood
When photojournalist Lawrence Schiller met Barbra Streisand on the set of On a Clear Day You Can See Forever in 1968, he felt like a new hire greeting the company CEO. "I didn't know if she liked me or not," he says, "but at the end of the week, I wasn't fired."Schiller and his colleague Steve Schapiro were hired by movie studio execs to shoot the star during the first decade of her movie career, capturing moments big and small for use in magazines around the world. Now they have collected their photos, many of which have never been published,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Truth Tell: Barbara Harris is Underappreciated

A Happy 79th birthday to Barbara Harris. She hasn't acted in such a long time but she was often just wonderful on the screen with unique rhythm, energy and comic ability.

I'm not sure that anything about Alfred Hitchcock's Family Plot (Hitch's last feature in 1976) totally works but if you could argue that any of it does it's either the cemetery scene or anything involving Barbara Harris's performance as a con-artist psychic. The movie is frustrating since it feels half formed and its inarguably flabby: every time you need the editing too tighten it up which would have made everything, including the memorable actors (Karen Black and Bruce Dern are also on hand), pop. It just keeps the scene going.

Barbara Harris's largest claim to fame these days is her Golden Globe nominated work in the original Freaky Friday (1976) wherein she switched bodies with her tomboy
See full article at FilmExperience »

Disney Theatrical is Bringing The Hunchback Of Notre Dame to La Jolla Playhouse

The musical, written by the multiple Academy, Grammy and Tony Award-winning team of composer Alan Menken (Newsies, Little Shop of Horrors) and lyricist Stephen Schwartz (Wicked, Pippin), will feature a book by Peter Parnell (The West Wing, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever) and will be directed by Scott Schwartz (Playhouse's Jane Eyre, Broadway's Golda's Balcony). Smash's Josh Bergasse will choreograph. Produced by special arrangement with Disney Theatrical Productions, the musical will run October 28 - December 7 in the Mandell Weiss Theatre. Said La Jolla Playhouse Artistic Director Christopher Ashley, "With great anticipation, I look forward to collaborating with the powerhouse creative team of Alan Menken, Stephen Schwartz, Peter Parnell and Scott Schwartz to bring Victor Hugo's...
See full article at The Daily BLAM! »

Disney Theatrical is Bringing The Hunchback Of Notre Dame to Broadway

The musical, written by the multiple Academy, Grammy and Tony Award-winning team of composer Alan Menken (Newsies, Little Shop of Horrors) and lyricist Stephen Schwartz (Wicked, Pippin), will feature a book by Peter Parnell (The West Wing, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever) and will be directed by Scott Schwartz (Playhouse's Jane Eyre, Broadway's Golda's Balcony). Smash's Josh Bergasse will choreograph. Produced by special arrangement with Disney Theatrical Productions, the musical will run October 28 - December 7 in the Mandell Weiss Theatre. Said La Jolla Playhouse Artistic Director Christopher Ashley, "With great anticipation, I look forward to collaborating with the powerhouse creative team of Alan Menken, Stephen Schwartz, Peter Parnell and Scott Schwartz to bring Victor Hugo's...
See full article at The Daily BLAM! »

Review: "Oliver!" (1968) Starring Ron Moody, Mark Lester And Oliver Reed, Twilight Time Blu-ray Limited Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer 

The magnificent Oscar-winning best picture of the year for 1968, Oliver!, has been released as a Blu-ray special limited edition (3,000 units) by Twilight Time. This adaptation of the smash stage hit was a dream project for director Lewis Gilbert but, much to his dismay, the director's seat was given to Sir Carol Reed. How Gilbert's version of the film would have differed will never be known but suffice it to say, it's hard to imagine he could have improved on Reed's vision. There had been numerous previous screen versions of Dickens' classic novel Oliver Twist, with the most notable being David Lean's 1948 movie with a star-making turn by Alec Guinness as Fagin. The 1963 stage musical by Lionel Bart was a sensation and it stood to reason that the screen rights were quickly scooped up. The film went against the tide when considering other major musicals of the period.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Fantastic Fest 2013 Short Film Lineup Announced

  • DailyDead
The features that make their premiere at Fantastic Fest tend to get much of the attention, but don’t forget that you’re likely to see some great short films at the event as well. Fantastic Fest is known for their extensive short film selection and this year is no different:

“Fantastic Fest is excited to announce the short film lineup for the ninth edition of Fantastic Fest, happening September 19th- 26th in Austin, Texas at Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline. Short films provide an outlet for filmmakers to showcase their genre talents in a format with fewer restraints, making them a Fantastic Fest favorite. Fantastic Fest is wildly excited that longtime festival comrade Kier-la Janisse is now our lead shorts programmer. Kier-la created the notorious CineMuerte Film Festival in Canada, and was the first full-time film programmer for the Alamo back in the “wild west” days. She has since gone on
See full article at DailyDead »

Fantastic Fest Announces 2013′s Short Film Lineup!!

It’s almost that time of the year, when filmgoers, filmmakers and everyone else make their way to Austin, Texas for the annual Fantastic Fest. This year’s Ff will host the world premiere of Machete Kills, screenings of Cheap Thrills, Ben Wheatley’s A Field In England, Keanu ReevesMan Of Tai Chi, The Cabal Cut of Nightbreed, the premiere of the Patrick remake (starring You’Re Next heroine Sharni Vinson), Alex de la Iglesia’s Witching & Bitching and many more films/events. Last year saw You’Re Next star/mumblecore king Joe Swanberg hand Devin Faraci his ass in the annual debate/boxing match held at the festival every year, and the tradition will be sure to continue, this time with two new faces stepping up to argue/fight.

Today, Fantastic Fest has announced the complete lineup of short films playing at the festival (happening September 19-26th), and judging from the roster,
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Wme Signs Stage Vets Michael Mayer And Stephen Karam As CAA Rivalry Hits Gotham

Exclusive: Theater veterans Michael Mayer and Stephen Karam have signed with Wme. Mayer received a Tony Award for his direction of Spring Awakening and was nominated for his work on Thoroughly Modern Millie. Karam is best known for writing Sons Of The Prophet, which was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize, and won Drama Critics Circle, Outer Critics Circle, Lucille Lortel and Hull-Warriner awards for Best Play. The pair come from CAA, as the one-upsmanship continues between Hollywood’s two top talent agencies. Now the competition seems to be spreading to New York, where things aren’t nearly as rabid. Mayer’s long list of Broadway shows includes American Idiot, On A Clear Day You Can See Forever, the Pulitzer-winning ‘night Mother, Everyday Rapture, After The Fall, An Almost Holy Picture, Uncle Vanya, You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown, Side Man and Triumph Of Love. Mayer has also been
See full article at Deadline TV »

Wme Signs Stage Vets Michael Mayer And Stephen Karam As CAA Rivalry Hits Gotham

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Theater veterans Michael Mayer and Stephen Karam have signed with Wme. Mayer received a Tony Award for his direction of Spring Awakening and was nominated for his work on Thoroughly Modern Millie. Karam is best known for writing Sons Of The Prophet, which was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize, and won Drama Critics Circle, Outer Critics Circle, Lucille Lortel and Hull-Warriner awards for Best Play. The pair come from CAA, as the one-upsmanship continues between Hollywood’s two top talent agencies. Now the competition seems to be spreading to New York, where things aren’t nearly as rabid. Mayer’s long list of Broadway shows includes American Idiot, On A Clear Day You Can See Forever, the Pulitzer-winning ‘night Mother, Everyday Rapture, After The Fall, An Almost Holy Picture, Uncle Vanya, You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown, Side Man and Triumph Of Love. Mayer has also been
See full article at Deadline »

Tony Awards 2012 winners list: 'Once' takes home the hardware

  • Pop2it
"Once," the Broadway adaptation of the 2006 Academy Award-winning film of the same name, took home the most awards at the 2012 Tony Awards. It won eight, including Best Musical and Best Leading Actor in a Musical for Steve Kazee.

The full winners list:

Best Play

Clybourne Park

Author: Bruce Norris

Producers: Jujamcyn Theaters, Jane Bergère, Roger Berlind/Quintet Productions, Eric Falkenstein/Dan Frishwasser, Ruth Hendel/Harris Karma Productions, Jtg Theatricals, Daryl Roth, Jon B. Platt, Center Theatre Group, Lincoln Center Theater, Playwrights Horizons

Other Desert Cities

Author: Jon Robin Baitz

Producers: Lincoln Center Theater, André Bishop, Bernard Gersten, Bob Boyett

Peter and the Starcatcher

Author: Rick Elice

Producers: Nancy Nagel Gibbs, Greg Schaffert, Eva Price, Tom Smedes, Disney Theatrical Productions, Suzan & Ken Wirth/DeBartolo Miggs, Catherine Schreiber/Daveed Frazier & Mark Thompson, Jack Lane, Jane Dubin, Allan S. Gordon/Adam S. Gordon, Baer & Casserly/Nathan Vernon, Rich Affanato/Peter Stern, Brunish & Trinchero/Laura Little Productions,
See full article at Pop2it »

Once Leads Tony Awards With 11 Nominations

Once Leads Tony Awards With 11 Nominations
Hit musical Once is leading the way at this year's Tony Awards after scooping 11 nominations.

The popular show has garnered nods across the board including the coveted Best Musical category at the 66th annual prizegiving, which honours the best on Broadway.

Once will go up against Leap of Faith, Newsies and Nice Work If You Can Get It for the top prize.

Meanwhile Clybourne Park, Other Desert Cities, Peter and the Starcatcher and Venus in Fur will all compete for the Best Play accolade.

Hollywood star Phillip Seymour Hoffman is nominated in the Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play category for his part in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and he'll go head-to-head with John Lithgow (The Columnist), Frank Langella (Man and Boy), James Earl Jones (Gore Vidal's The Best Man) and James Corden (One Man, Two Guvnors) for the honour.

Sex and the City's Cynthia Nixon is up for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play title for her turn in Wit but she'll face stiff competition from Nina Arianda (Venus in Fur), Tracie Bennett (End of the Rainbow), Stockard Channing (Other Desert Cities) and Linda Lavin (The Lyons).

Also landing mentions were new Spider-Man star Andrew Garfield for his feature role in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and David Alan Grier for his part in The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess.

The winners will be unveiled at the prizegiving ceremony, hosted by funnyman Neil Patrick Harris, on 10 June at The Beacon Theatre in New York City.

The main list of nominees is as follows:

Best Play:

Clybourne Park

Other Desert Cities

Peter and the Starcatcher

Venus in Fur

Best Musical:

Leap of Faith

Newsies

Nice Work If You Can Get It

Once

Best Book of a Musical:

Lysistrata Jones - Douglas Carter Beane

Newsies - Harvey Fierstein

Nice Work if You Can Get It - Joe Dipietro

Once - Enda Walsh

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre:

Bonnie & Clyde - Frank Wildhorn and Don Black

Newsies - Alan Menken and Jack Feldman

One Man, Two Guvnors - Grant Olding

Peter and the Starcatcher - Wayne Barker and Rick Elice

Best Revival of a Play:

Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

Gore Vidal's The Best Man

Master Class

Wit

Best Revival of a Musical:

Evita

Follies

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Jesus Christ Superstar

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play:

James Corden - One Man, Two Guvnors

Philip Seymour Hoffman - Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

James Earl Jones - Gore Vidal's The Best Man

Frank Langella - Man and Boy

John Lithgow - The Columnist

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play:

Nina Arianda - Venus in Fur

Tracie Bennett - End of the Rainbow

Stockard Channing - Other Desert Cities

Linda Lavin - The Lyons

Cynthia Nixon - Wit

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical:

Danny Burstein - Follies

Jeremy Jordan - Newsies

Steve Kazee - Once

Norm Lewis - The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Ron Raines - Follies

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical:

Jan Maxwell - Follies

Audra McDonald - The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Cristin Milioti - Once

Kelli O'Hara - Nice Work If You Can Get It

Laura Osnes - Bonnie & Clyde

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play:

Christian Borle - Peter and the Starcatcher

Michael Cumpsty - End of the Rainbow

Tom Edden - One Man, Two Guvnors

Andrew Garfield - Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

Jeremy Shamos - Clybourne Park

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play:

Linda Emond - Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

Spencer Kayden - Don't Dress for Dinner

Celia Keenan-Bolger - Peter and the Starcatcher

Judith Light - Other Desert Cities

Condola Rashad - Stick Fly

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical:

Phillip Boykin - The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Michael Cerveris - Evita

David Alan Grier -The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Michael McGrath - Nice Work If You Can Get It

Josh Young - Jesus Christ Superstar

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical:

Elizabeth A. Davis - Once

Jayne Houdyshell - Follies

Judy Kaye - Nice Work if You Can Get It

Jessie Mueller - On a Clear Day You Can See Forever

Da'Vine Joy Randolph - Ghost the Musical

Best Direction of a Play:

One Man, Two Guvnors - Nicholas Hytner

Clybourne Park - Pam MacKinnon

Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman - Mike Nichols

Peter and the Starcatcher - Roger Rees and Alex Timbers

Best Direction of a Musical:

Newsies - Jeff Calhoun

Nice Work If You Can Get It - Kathleen Marshall

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess - Diane Paulus

Once - John Tiffany

Best Choreography:

Evita - Rob Ashford

Newsies - Christopher Gattelli

Once - Steven Hoggett

Nice Work If You Can Get It - Kathleen Marshall

Best Orchestrations:

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess - William David Brohn and Christopher Jahnke

Nice Work If You Can Get It - Bill Elliott

Once - Martin Lowe

Newsies - Danny Troob.
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